aohkteivnart
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For those who are undertaking either Computer Science or Computer Science with Mathematics in the UK, may I ask how the two courses differ? I am considering pursuing one of the two courses but I don't really know what to choose. I am quite confident that I can get 80+ for Oxford MAT so maybe I don't mind studying some math in university? Anyway thanks in advance.
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AcseI
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As a course, CompSci can be quite varied. Some courses heavily emphasise the programming aspect, so they'll be heavier on topics like algorithms and by extension Maths. Other CompSci courses will be more broad, focusing on a wider range of skills such as networking, architecture and security.

CompSci with Maths is really as the name says, it's CompSci with an extra emphasis on Maths. So as you'd expect, there will be an overlap between Maths heavy CompSci and courses that actually are CompSci with Maths. But there will also be more Maths heavy concepts that you wouldn't see in regular CS. CompSci courses with Maths elements are more likely to cover Maths that is relevant to CompSci. CompSci with Maths as a dedicated course will be more like a mix of both degrees.

It's difficult to say how they compare though, because degrees are not standardised. Each uni can teach what they want, and you'd be better off looking at the course content for any universities you are considering.
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artful_lounger
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Something to be aware of is that the maths done in a maths degree (including joint honours courses) is very different to the maths you'll be familiar with at A-level and often the kind of maths you would do in other numerate degrees (e.g. CS, engineering, etc). The latter tends to be what would be referred to at degree level as mathematical methods, while maths degree maths is quite different; very abstract usually (even the "applied" options very often) and primarily based on writing proofs rather than solving problems. I'd suggest seeing if you can look at some maths of that kind (e.g. in Spivak's Calculus, any other equivalent introduction analysis type text, or an introductory linear algebra text that focuses on the abstract rather than computational side of things, or maybe an intro to abstract algebra). This might give you more of an idea what to expect from the maths half of a CS & Maths degree (and if you find it's not your taste you can just focus on single honours CS courses - which will still have a lot of maths in it, but more similar to the kind you'll be used to from A-level).
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RichE
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(Original post by aohkteivnart)
For those who are undertaking either Computer Science or Computer Science with Mathematics in the UK, may I ask how the two courses differ? I am considering pursuing one of the two courses but I don't really know what to choose. I am quite confident that I can get 80+ for Oxford MAT so maybe I don't mind studying some math in university? Anyway thanks in advance.
Maths & CS in Oxford is definitely not a CS with Maths type course. It is a genuine joint course and the two disciplines have equal priority. The CS course in Oxford is very mathematical/theoretical already (compared with some CS courses). I'd suggest looking into the straight CS course first. By comparison the Maths & CS has more on analysis (pure maths behind calculus) and abstract algebra (group theory). Is that stuff you'd like to study?
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aohkteivnart
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(Original post by AcseI)
As a course, CompSci can be quite varied. Some courses heavily emphasise the programming aspect, so they'll be heavier on topics like algorithms and by extension Maths. Other CompSci courses will be more broad, focusing on a wider range of skills such as networking, architecture and security.

CompSci with Maths is really as the name says, it's CompSci with an extra emphasis on Maths. So as you'd expect, there will be an overlap between Maths heavy CompSci and courses that actually are CompSci with Maths. But there will also be more Maths heavy concepts that you wouldn't see in regular CS. CompSci courses with Maths elements are more likely to cover Maths that is relevant to CompSci. CompSci with Maths as a dedicated course will be more like a mix of both degrees.

It's difficult to say how they compare though, because degrees are not standardised. Each uni can teach what they want, and you'd be better off looking at the course content for any universities you are considering.
Thanks mate
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aohkteivnart
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
Something to be aware of is that the maths done in a maths degree (including joint honours courses) is very different to the maths you'll be familiar with at A-level and often the kind of maths you would do in other numerate degrees (e.g. CS, engineering, etc). The latter tends to be what would be referred to at degree level as mathematical methods, while maths degree maths is quite different; very abstract usually (even the "applied" options very often) and primarily based on writing proofs rather than solving problems. I'd suggest seeing if you can look at some maths of that kind (e.g. in Spivak's Calculus, any other equivalent introduction analysis type text, or an introductory linear algebra text that focuses on the abstract rather than computational side of things, or maybe an intro to abstract algebra). This might give you more of an idea what to expect from the maths half of a CS & Maths degree (and if you find it's not your taste you can just focus on single honours CS courses - which will still have a lot of maths in it, but more similar to the kind you'll be used to from A-level).
Thanks for your suggestion
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aohkteivnart
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(Original post by RichE)
Maths & CS in Oxford is definitely not a CS with Maths type course. It is a genuine joint course and the two disciplines have equal priority. The CS course in Oxford is very mathematical/theoretical already (compared with some CS courses). I'd suggest looking into the straight CS course first. By comparison the Maths & CS has more on analysis (pure maths behind calculus) and abstract algebra (group theory). Is that stuff you'd like to study?
Thank you
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