Physicsqueen
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Just about to do first clothes wash at university and was wondering if it’s better to use a tumble dryer or just use my clothes horse back in my flat instead? How long do clothes usually take to air dry?

Thanks for any answers in advance
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claireestelle
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Just about to do first clothes wash at university and was wondering if it’s better to use a tumble dryer or just use my clothes horse back in my flat instead? How long do clothes usually take to air dry?

Thanks for any answers in advance
from a moneysaving perspective i'd use your clothes horse, it depends on how warm your room is, could be about a day to dry for some things but can be a bit quicker.
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Callicious
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If free use dryer. If not free then don't.

Just read labels before using dryer.

From environmental perspective, air drying is best, but I won't push that rhetoric beyond saying it.
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999tigger
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Would agree with Claire.
Clothes horse for most of stuff, depending what it is then 12-24hrs. It can be expensive otherwise.
Use the drier for an emergency or things which are hard to dry to get most of the moisture out.
Its going to be a bit trial and error as you also need to check how much moisture it introduces. If you have a bathroom (for the lucky ones) then that becomes your drying room.
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AcseI
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Just about to do first clothes wash at university and was wondering if it’s better to use a tumble dryer or just use my clothes horse back in my flat instead? How long do clothes usually take to air dry?

Thanks for any answers in advance
Depends on the type of clothes, the quantity, how warm your room is, etc. There's no fixed answer but as a general rule of thumb don't expect anything to be wearable the same day you wash it. If you've got a large bundle of clothes, your clothes horse is tightly packed or it just isn't warm then it may take much longer. It's also worth considering the practical side of things. Do you have somewhere to put your drying? Are you alright with the smell and potential damp. I personally avoided tumble dryers as much as possible at uni, but some people couldn't deal with having wet clothes hanging around their room.

If you do opt to use the tumble dryers, check the labels on your clothes. Some clothes will get damaged if you tumble dry them. Similarly check the labels on washing, as some clothes shouldn't be washed at high temperatures, or the colours may run. If you want to iron, there will be instructions for that too.
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Physicsqueen
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Thanks everyone. Also just wanted to check, as air drying clothes in my room will increase the moisture in my room, it won’t set off the smoke alarm will it? Probably a stupid question :lol:
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mnot
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Just about to do first clothes wash at university and was wondering if it’s better to use a tumble dryer or just use my clothes horse back in my flat instead? How long do clothes usually take to air dry?

Thanks for any answers in advance
Depends on if you are in halls or or a house. In halls its pretty unpracticable to dry clothes in your flat due to limited space. (although it does cost a bomb so if you have space for a clothes horse its worth doing).

In a house: I do a partial dry i.e. basically short a dryer cycle then let them air dry, I do this because from what I understand dryers aren't very good for clothes. Particularly once fabric gets close to dry its basically like toasting the cotton.
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martin7
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Just about to do first clothes wash at university and was wondering if it’s better to use a tumble dryer or just use my clothes horse back in my flat instead? How long do clothes usually take to air dry?

Thanks for any answers in advance
If you dry clothes on a clothes horse, the water has to go somewhere -- so the air can get damp, and if you don't ventilate properly the damp can ultimately start causing mould on walls and other surfaces.

At home I generally tumble-dry the stuff that can be tumble-dried and put the rest on a clothes horse. (If the weather's nice, I try to use a rotary washing line in the garden rather than the tumble-dryer or clothes horse, though I appreciate not everyone has that ability.)
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mnot
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Thanks everyone. Also just wanted to check, as air drying clothes in my room will increase the moisture in my room, it won’t set off the smoke alarm will it? Probably a stupid question :lol:
No.
Smoke detectors normally detect CO not water vapour, and I doubt its a significant volume anyway.
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Physicsqueen
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(Original post by mnot)
No.
Smoke detectors normally detect CO2 not water vapour, and I doubt its a significant volume anyway.
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martin7
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(Original post by mnot)
No.
Smoke detectors normally detect CO not water vapour, and I doubt its a significant volume anyway.
I have a tumble dryer with a removable cartridge for the water (rather than it being connected to the plumbing), and for some loads it's surprising just how much water it removes.
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AcseI
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Thanks everyone. Also just wanted to check, as air drying clothes in my room will increase the moisture in my room, it won’t set off the smoke alarm will it? Probably a stupid question :lol:
If it did, you'd have to worry about the smoke alarms going off every time it got a bit humid. It is worth trying to keep you window open as much as possible when drying though, if nothing else to prevent damp and mould from forming. Of course with winter approaching don't let it get too cold.
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Physicsqueen
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(Original post by AcseI)
If it did, you'd have to worry about the smoke alarms going off every time it got a bit humid. It is worth trying to keep you window open as much as possible when drying though, if nothing else to prevent damp and mould from forming. Of course with winter approaching don't let it get too cold.
Thanks for the tip. Luckily I’ve got space next to my window for my clothes airer.
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mnot
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(Original post by martin7)
I have a tumble dryer with a removable cartridge for the water (rather than it being connected to the plumbing), and for some loads it's surprising just how much water it removes.
Im sure it could be a few litres of water (and enough to smell) but what I meant was relative to the volume of air in the room. (Just some napkin maths, say a room is 10mx5mx4m thats 200m^3 or 200,000 litres) even accounting for volumetric expansion I cant imagine it would be a huge amount relative to the ambient air and if you open a window it will drop further.
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by Physicsqueen)
Just about to do first clothes wash at university and was wondering if it’s better to use a tumble dryer or just use my clothes horse back in my flat instead? How long do clothes usually take to air dry?

Thanks for any answers in advance
Hiya!

It can be quite costly using washers and dryers at uni so you have to use them wisely! I would say tumble dry your bed sheets and towels just to make sure they're nice and soft and dry. I usually do this once every two weeks. Then for the rest of your clothes I would recommend just washing them, and using a spin and drain setting (if your washer has this setting) to try rinse off as much water as possible, making it easier and quicker to dry on your clothes horse in your room! Then your clothes should be dry in up to two days ish.

Sam- Official Student Rep
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