bxckxx263
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so basically i’m in year 13 and should be writing my personal statement, but i don’t even know what degree i should do. my options are: accounting and finance, international relations or primary education

to be honest i don’t know anything about accounting and finance, other than the fact i’ll probably get a good job with a good pay. I got grade A in AS maths which might be beneficial but other than that i don’t have any other reason to pick it tbh

International relations is something i’m actually interested in, i’m just scared of there being no job prospects as i can’t really think of any specific job i can get with that degree, plus i really really hate debating, and i know that shouldn’t be a reason why i shouldn’t pick a degree but i can’t help it

Primary education is quite random, i enjoy being around/looking after kids, but i’m not sure if i’d like to do it all day every day, and i definitely can’t imagine myself being a teacher for 20+ years

A gap year really isn’t an option for me due to strict parents but i’m scared i’m gonna make the wrong decision and basically f up my life lol, any help would be really appreciated (:
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historynerd47
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Normally I would say do whichever you prefer, but to me from your post alone (obviously I don't know you), accounting and finance seems by far your best fit of the three.
In terms of education, really you need work experience in a school to know if you want to teach and that's very difficult at the moment. Additionally, you can easily go into education after an undergraduate degree- that's a very common route, so if you do decide that's what you want to do as you career you can further down the line.

International relations doesn't link directly to many careers which wouldn't matter so much if you were particularly passionate about it. I think debating and negotiating skills would be significant in careers related to international relations.

As you have an option that you have the academic aptitude for and would lead much more directly to a variety of careers, I would go for accounting and finance if in doubt.

I do get the impression however that you're not sure what you want to do, and I would personally recommend taking a gap year and applying then as you don't want to end up doing something you hate. I would probably discuss this with your parents- they would hopefully understand why you would consider a gap year more if they knew how divided you were about potential courses.

These are just my suggestions though- to give you one opinion to agree/disagree with
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McGinger
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Choose a degree where you can pick-and-choose between different subjects. You can then develop your own interests and focus as the degree progresses. Liberal Arts, Combined Honours etc.

Some examples :
Manchester : https://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/stu...xible-honours/
Liverpool : https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/study/un...bined-degrees/
Keele : https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/underg...s/liberalarts/
Leeds : https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/g809/liberal-arts-ba
Derby : https://www.derby.ac.uk/undergraduat...joint-honours/
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bxckxx263
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(Original post by historynerd47)
Normally I would say do whichever you prefer, but to me from your post alone (obviously I don't know you), accounting and finance seems by far your best fit of the three.
In terms of education, really you need work experience in a school to know if you want to teach and that's very difficult at the moment. Additionally, you can easily go into education after an undergraduate degree- that's a very common route, so if you do decide that's what you want to do as you career you can further down the line.

International relations doesn't link directly to many careers which wouldn't matter so much if you were particularly passionate about it. I think debating and negotiating skills would be significant in careers related to international relations.

As you have an option that you have the academic aptitude for and would lead much more directly to a variety of careers, I would go for accounting and finance if in doubt.

I do get the impression however that you're not sure what you want to do, and I would personally recommend taking a gap year and applying then as you don't want to end up doing something you hate. I would probably discuss this with your parents- they would hopefully understand why you would consider a gap year more if they knew how divided you were about potential courses.

These are just my suggestions though- to give you one opinion to agree/disagree with
thank you so much!!!
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bxckxx263
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(Original post by McGinger)
Choose a degree where you can pick-and-choose between different subjects. You can then develop your own interests and focus as the degree progresses. Liberal Arts, Combined Honours etc.

Some examples :
Manchester : https://www.alc.manchester.ac.uk/stu...xible-honours/
Liverpool : https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/study/un...bined-degrees/
Keele : https://www.keele.ac.uk/study/underg...s/liberalarts/
Leeds : https://courses.leeds.ac.uk/g809/liberal-arts-ba
Derby : https://www.derby.ac.uk/undergraduat...joint-honours/
oh wow i didn’t know this was a thing, thank you so much!!
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_bethan_
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(Original post by bxckxx263)
so basically i’m in year 13 and should be writing my personal statement, but i don’t even know what degree i should do. my options are: accounting and finance, international relations or primary education

to be honest i don’t know anything about accounting and finance, other than the fact i’ll probably get a good job with a good pay. I got grade A in AS maths which might be beneficial but other than that i don’t have any other reason to pick it tbh

International relations is something i’m actually interested in, i’m just scared of there being no job prospects as i can’t really think of any specific job i can get with that degree, plus i really really hate debating, and i know that shouldn’t be a reason why i shouldn’t pick a degree but i can’t help it

Primary education is quite random, i enjoy being around/looking after kids, but i’m not sure if i’d like to do it all day every day, and i definitely can’t imagine myself being a teacher for 20+ years

A gap year really isn’t an option for me due to strict parents but i’m scared i’m gonna make the wrong decision and basically f up my life lol, any help would be really appreciated (:
I don't know if this helps at all, but for primary teaching degrees, they do not require work experience at the moment (because of COVID-19). For teaching at higher levels, your degree has to be 50% in the subject you want to teach (secondary teaching and above).

But, I would suggest joint honours degrees or liberal arts. The only problem with liberal arts is that it can give you quite an open and almost vague degree which is less employable. You also have to pick STEM or humanities. But, once you find that subject that you really enjoy, you can persue that more and have a really broad and employable skills set.

The only degree that combines STEM and humanities that I know of is one at UCL. I would follow you passions though and pick something that is highly in demand and that you will enjoy because I'm sure job opportunities will be less for our year due to the pandemic.

Good luck!
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McGinger
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(Original post by _bethan_)
The only problem with liberal arts is that it can give you quite an open and almost vague degree which is less employable.
Source?
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_bethan_
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(Original post by McGinger)
Source?
Durham University Open Days - 2020

https://www.dur.ac.uk/liberal.arts/

As long as you have a main focus on one or two subjects, it should be fine. They heavily warn against more than that in all of the open days and livestreams.
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McGinger
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(Original post by _bethan_)
As long as you have a main focus on one or two subjects, it should be fine. They heavily warn against more than that in all of the open days and livestreams.
So, actually is not 'Liberal Arts' that makes you supposedly 'unemployable' (your phrase, not theirs) , its just subject choices.
(Durham are hardly likely to market an entire degree program by telling you its a waste of time for a graduate job are they?)
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PhoenixRose338
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From what you've said, I would go with finance. You are good at it and if you want, you can always go into teaching after your degree.
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_bethan_
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(Original post by McGinger)
So, actually is not 'Liberal Arts' that makes you supposedly 'unemployable' (your phrase, not theirs) , its just subject choices.
(Durham are hardly likely to market an entire degree program by telling you its a waste of time for a graduate job are they?)
Liberal Arts is useful for someone who doesn't know exactly what they want to do. It provides a wide range of extremely employable skills in many subject and professional areas. This is my opinion.

The problem comes from too many options and too many skills that prevent you from specialising in one area. The tutors guide you through the process and make it a valuable qualification, but it helps to be aware of this before the degree. As a heads-up, my friend did a liberal arts degree and is finding employment difficult in this current climate as her degree is not tailored to a specific subject or career but a broad range of skills.

I would look more on the websites and find out what is right for you. I wish you all the best on your application!

Edit: Spelling
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cryingchild
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i would say do international relations as you’re actually interested in and doing a degree ur not interested in at all will not go down well. although u dont like debating, maybe you can work on that skill ??? or if you’re not up for that, maybe its best if you do accounting and finance if it’s the one you’re most comfortable with.

just think what you’d be more comfortable and happy doing in the long run.
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etienne26
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What A levels are you currently doing?
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McGinger
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(Original post by _bethan_)
degree is not tailored to a specific subject or career but a broad range of skills.
As are a vast number of other Arts and Humanities degrees - but it doesnt stop thousands of graduates in those subjects getting jobs.
(ie. The 'employment' problem might not actually be anything to do with the degree she's taken).
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MagicFish
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(Original post by _bethan_)
Durham University Open Days - 2020

https://www.dur.ac.uk/liberal.arts/

As long as you have a main focus on one or two subjects, it should be fine. They heavily warn against more than that in all of the open days and livestreams.
From Durham website:
Liberal Arts graduates are highly employable. Employers recognise the value of a degree from a university with an international reputation for academic excellence, and of the wide range of skills which our students develop through their extensive involvement in sport, theatre, music, community service and many other activities in their colleges and across the University. Graduates of multidisciplinary programmes are especially attractive to employers because of the range of their intellectual skills, their adaptability, their capacity to make creative connections and their independence of mind.
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bxckxx263
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(Original post by _bethan_)
I don't know if this helps at all, but for primary teaching degrees, they do not require work experience at the moment (because of COVID-19). For teaching at higher levels, your degree has to be 50% in the subject you want to teach (secondary teaching and above).

But, I would suggest joint honours degrees or liberal arts. The only problem with liberal arts is that it can give you quite an open and almost vague degree which is less employable. You also have to pick STEM or humanities. But, once you find that subject that you really enjoy, you can persue that more and have a really broad and employable skills set.

The only degree that combines STEM and humanities that I know of is one at UCL. I would follow you passions though and pick something that is highly in demand and that you will enjoy because I'm sure job opportunities will be less for our year due to the pandemic.

Good luck!
i’m so sorry i’m late but thank you!!
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bxckxx263
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(Original post by etienne26)
What A levels are you currently doing?
i’m sorry this is late i totally forgot about this post but i do economics, psychology and geography! i actually decided to do a degree in international business instead lmao even tho i think it’ll be a *****y degree i didn’t know what else to do
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Swansea University Enquiries
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(Original post by bxckxx263)
i’m sorry this is late i totally forgot about this post but i do economics, psychology and geography! i actually decided to do a degree in international business instead lmao even tho i think it’ll be a *****y degree i didn’t know what else to do
Hey bxckxx263

International Business doesn't sound like a bad move to me! depending on the flexibility of module choices you could pick up quite a varied skillset and knowledge pool by the time you graduate. I say this to almost all students I speak to - what you get out of University depends on what you put into it, as much as it depends on your degree.

I understand there is a lot of pressure to choose your University degree, but there is actually a lot of flexibility both in University and the working world when it comes to your degree. A course like International Business can provide you with a wealth of transferable skills, and if you seek out and find employment opportunities, placements and voluntary work whilst at uni this will compliment your degree too.

I hope this helps
- Mia
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by bxckxx263)
so basically i’m in year 13 and should be writing my personal statement, but i don’t even know what degree i should do. my options are: accounting and finance, international relations or primary education

to be honest i don’t know anything about accounting and finance, other than the fact i’ll probably get a good job with a good pay. I got grade A in AS maths which might be beneficial but other than that i don’t have any other reason to pick it tbh

International relations is something i’m actually interested in, i’m just scared of there being no job prospects as i can’t really think of any specific job i can get with that degree, plus i really really hate debating, and i know that shouldn’t be a reason why i shouldn’t pick a degree but i can’t help it

Primary education is quite random, i enjoy being around/looking after kids, but i’m not sure if i’d like to do it all day every day, and i definitely can’t
Hi,

Have you chosen your course yet? If so, what is it?
I would pick a course you are interested in rather than thinking about future money. Accounting and finance must be something you like - do you see yourself working in that area? If you do not enjoy it then the course and the job after might be boring and draining!
Consider what you want to do! You can always take a year out and figure out what you want to do. It is all your choice!

Good luck!

Marlena - Official Student Rep
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bxckxx263
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(Original post by Swansea University Enquiries)
Hey bxckxx263

International Business doesn't sound like a bad move to me! depending on the flexibility of module choices you could pick up quite a varied skillset and knowledge pool by the time you graduate. I say this to almost all students I speak to - what you get out of University depends on what you put into it, as much as it depends on your degree.

I understand there is a lot of pressure to choose your University degree, but there is actually a lot of flexibility both in University and the working world when it comes to your degree. A course like International Business can provide you with a wealth of transferable skills, and if you seek out and find employment opportunities, placements and voluntary work whilst at uni this will compliment your degree too.

I hope this helps
- Mia
thank you!!
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