Wierd swimming question lol

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vix.xvi
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Lol I'm watching to much Bondi rescue rn so...
What r u supposed to do in a situation where you can see someone drowning but you have no flotation device with you? Should you swim back in and get an acc lifeguard or what? Cuz apparently if you go to a drowning person they'll just cling on to you and you'll both end up drowning each other aha but if someone's drowning you don't really have the time to go back in and get something/someone...you know what I mean? So what do you do in that case?

PS Id say I'm a very strong swimmer, but I'm not strong at all aha...it would be a diff story if I acc had some strength lol. I'm like 5'2 and 45 kg
Last edited by vix.xvi; 3 months ago
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LuigiMario
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Do a rescue training course?
I did a simple hour or so basics of rescue, and you are trained to approach the person in distress from the right way, such that you can manage their ‘flailing’
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Do a rescue training course?
I did a simple hour or so basics of rescue, and you are trained to approach the person in distress from the right way, such that you can manage their ‘flailing’
Yhh I should probs do one
I just know a couple of basic things like u have to approach them from behind and stuff like that

But rn...If I saw someone drowning without much knowledge what would I do lol
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LuigiMario
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
Yhh I should probs do one
I just know a couple of basic things like u have to approach them from behind and stuff like that

But rn...If I saw someone drowning without much knowledge what would I do lol
Phone the coastguard?
Many incidents off the coast can be due to rip-tides, very strong currents, similarly rivers and even a strong swimmer who goes in to save someone could potentially also be affected.

I did a lot of nuclear experiments at work using large amounts of liquid nitrogen gas, we had a strict protocol that if there was a gas leak (and this did happen) that we had to phone the fire rescue service , rather than go and help someone that we could see was in trouble.

Why? Well, LN2 causes ‘drowning’ in that it can asphyxiate by displacing the oxygen, and typically when an incident occurs around FIVE people can die. The initial person with a problem, and the next four people who try to help, until someone phones a professional rescue.

The same happens in Farming slurry incidents, and some industrial accidents.

So it’s important to know the best safety protocol for where you are, Bondi beach shark protocol, or whatever, and also take any training in life-saving that you see, whether for general daily-use or for hols etc.

I was eventually trained (as an amateur) to jog around the nuclear research centre in full breathing apparatus ( the air goes quick! ) and trained to rescue collapsed people from burning buildings! Luckily never had to do it, but was nice knowing that I might be able to help.
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by LuigiMario)
Phone the coastguard?
Many incidents off the coast can be due to rip-tides, very strong currents, similarly rivers and even a strong swimmer who goes in to save someone could potentially also be affected.

I did a lot of nuclear experiments at work using large amounts of liquid nitrogen gas, we had a strict protocol that if there was a gas leak (and this did happen) that we had to phone the fire rescue service , rather than go and help someone that we could see was in trouble.

Why? Well, LN2 causes ‘drowning’ in that it can asphyxiate by displacing the oxygen, and typically when an incident occurs around FIVE people can die. The initial person with a problem, and the next four people who try to help, until someone phones a professional rescue.

The same happens in Farming slurry incidents, and some industrial accidents.

So it’s important to know the best safety protocol for where you are, Bondi beach shark protocol, or whatever, and also take any training in life-saving that you see, whether for general daily-use or for hols etc.

I was eventually trained (as an amateur) to jog around the nuclear research centre in full breathing apparatus ( the air goes quick! ) and trained to rescue collapsed people from burning buildings! Luckily never had to do it, but was nice knowing that I might be able to help.
Ooh thanks for sharing...very interesting to read
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username402722
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I agree with phoning the coastguard. I recall somewhere (I think it may have been Blackpool) where a person went into the sea to rescue a dog, got into difficulty, someone went to help them, and both people drowned.
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by barnetlad)
I agree with phoning the coastguard. I recall somewhere (I think it may have been Blackpool) where a person went into the sea to rescue a dog, got into difficulty, someone went to help them, and both people drowned.
Oh dear 😱☹️😣
But the thing is it will probs take a lot longer to get out the sea, call someone, them come and rescue them, you know? I'd just feel rly guilty if soemthing happened to them for not doing anything tho I can swim....
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chopingirl
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Do you live in cumbria or something?
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by chopingirl)
Do you live in cumbria or something?
Nah mate
I'm in the UK atm
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chopingirl
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
Nah mate
I'm in the UK atm
ah jeez and I though I was bad at geography. Cumbria is in the north of england and is known for lots of lakes and flooding...:facepalm2:
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by chopingirl)
ah jeez and I though I was bad at geography. Cumbria is in the north of england and is known for lots of lakes and flooding...:facepalm2:
Ohhh lmao
I was acc thinking of taking geo at a level, good thing I didn't 🤭
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