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I want to study something like business economics at university of Lancaster. After doing my research I have come across that economics is the most boring subjects or degree to study at undergraduate level. However, I have also heard that it is interesting and its content heavy as there are lots of theories to cover. Is Economics degree diffcult. what kind of people study economics and is economics right for me.

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itsyahg
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Well if that's what you want to do then don't read stuff online about it. It's better to do something you enjoy and really want to do than to do something that others say is easily but not have a passion in it. I've heard some ppl doing economics and they found it alright, you just need a passion
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(Original post by itsyahg)
Well if that's what you want to do then don't read stuff online about it. It's better to do something you enjoy and really want to do than to do something that others say is easily but not have a passion in it. I've heard some ppl doing economics and they found it alright, you just need a passion
I don't even actually know what degree to do and dont kbow if I have a passion for economics.
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itsyahg
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(Original post by Q and A)
I don't even actually know what degree to do and dont kbow if I have a passion for economics.
don't listen to other ppl's opinions on courses. I am currently doing a maths degree. My sixth form maths teacher told me not to as it's so hard. So many of my 'friends' also told me not to do a maths course as it's so hard. But i decided to do it as i have a passion. and because of my passion i don't find it hard. You need to figure out what you have a passion in first before you decide
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artful_lounger
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As above, it's boring for some, very interesting to others. I'd suggest doing some reading around the subject, to see how it strikes you. This might be e.g. lecture notes or revision materials for introductory economics classes (or A-level Economics, if you haven't studied that), especially microeconomics topics (since those are more relevant to business economics type courses), or reading economics related articles in the news and thinking about how they analysed the situations in those articles (or better yet, do both!).

Bear in mind though in a degree some of the content may be more dry or mathematical than you'll find in some introductory course materials, or as presented in a news article written for the general public (or even specialists in business/finance sectors, compared to content specifically written for economists and economics students), but if you find the bigger picture things interesting and can make the links between the "detail" and that, it shouldn't be too much of an issue I imagine. It is worth noting that economics at degree level is necessarily mathematical though, so if maths isn't a strong point consider carefully if a degree in that area (even if it's a diluted form of economics e.g. business economics, land economy, etc) is right for you.
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(Original post by itsyahg)
don't listen to other ppl's opinions on courses. I am currently doing a maths degree. My sixth form maths teacher told me not to as it's so hard. So many of my 'friends' also told me not to do a maths course as it's so hard. But i decided to do it as i have a passion. and because of my passion i don't find it hard. You need to figure out what you have a passion in first before you decide
Yes, Thanks. I'm working on that, people did say to me university too hard etc and u won't make it but these negative thoughts bring negative outcomes. now i need to work on this. i need for find what interest me and what my passion is. what is ur passion and how do you find out ur passion.

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itsyahg
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(Original post by Q and A)
Yes, Thanks. I'm working on that, people did say to me university too hard etc and u won't make it but these negative thoughts bring negative outcomes. now i need to work on this. i need for find what interest me and what my passion is. what is ur passion and how do you find out ur passion.

Thanks
Yes deffo don't listen to others. University is only hard when you don't like the course and don't have a passion for it. I do have a passion for maths. it's been my favourite subject in school and the one I also got the highest grades in. Luckily I had an amazing maths teacher and I really enjoyed going to maths lessons. I had a passion that I want to continue doing maths and just learn more. It was the subject where a lot of my friends would ask me on help with and when i helped them i felt very satisfied and loved sharing my knowledge on it.
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
As above, it's boring for some, very interesting to others. I'd suggest doing some reading around the subject, to see how it strikes you. This might be e.g. lecture notes or revision materials for introductory economics classes (or A-level Economics, if you haven't studied that), especially microeconomics topics (since those are more relevant to business economics type courses), or reading economics related articles in the news and thinking about how they analysed the situations in those articles (or better yet, do both!).

Bear in mind though in a degree some of the content may be more dry or mathematical than you'll find in some introductory course materials, or as presented in a news article written for the general public (or even specialists in business/finance sectors, compared to content specifically written for economists and economics students), but if you find the bigger picture things interesting and can make the links between the "detail" and that, it shouldn't be too much of an issue I imagine. It is worth noting that economics at degree level is necessarily mathematical though, so if maths isn't a strong point consider carefully if a degree in that area (even if it's a diluted form of economics e.g. business economics, land economy, etc) is right for you.
Hi
Thanks for showing interest. I have started reading 📚 Books on economics. As im taking a gap year I purchased a a level economics books and I've started tobread it and covered things like scarcity and economics agents and behavioural economics, marginal utility but I wanst either bored or neither get excited but it was good to know what consumers and producers want. I will keep exploring and like u said look at some articles online etc. i was wondering are you studying economics? I'm planning to speak to lectires and see what there have to say. yes considering a degree such as business economics will mean less mathematics but more theory.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Q and A)
Hi
Thanks for showing interest. I have started reading 📚 Books on economics. As im taking a gap year I purchased a a level economics books and I've started tobread it and covered things like scarcity and economics agents and behavioural economics, marginal utility but I wanst either bored or neither get excited but it was good to know what consumers and producers want. I will keep exploring and like u said look at some articles online etc. i was wondering are you studying economics? I'm planning to speak to lectires and see what there have to say. yes considering a degree such as business economics will mean less mathematics but more theory.
No, I'm not studying economics, although we did cover some aspects of economics in one of my modules when I was studying engineering. I would say if you aren't that engaged with the content now then that might be a sign it's not something that really interests you that much. It might be worth exploring some other possible courses and following your interests to see what else appeals, although you don't need to completely rule out the economics angle.
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(Original post by artful_lounger)
No, I'm not studying economics, although we did cover some aspects of economics in one of my modules when I was studying engineering. I would say if you aren't that engaged with the content now then that might be a sign it's not something that really interests you that much. It might be worth exploring some other possible courses and following your interests to see what else appeals, although you don't need to completely rule out the economics angle.
Would it be possible if you could let me in on what you learnt during ur economics module, I think ots top early to cut it off now bit I need to learn more about economics and its principles etc.
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artful_lounger
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(Original post by Q and A)
Would it be possible if you could let me in on what you learnt during ur economics module, I think ots top early to cut it off now bit I need to learn more about economics and its principles etc.
It wasn't an economics module - it was a management module, we just did a section on some economics stuff in the process. I can't really tell you much though, as it was about 5 or 6 years ago and honestly I was not a huge fan of that module so pretty quickly forgot most of it. (I definitely fall into the camp of people for whom that stuff is boring ).
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MindMax2000
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Having done an economics related degree at Lancaster, I can say economics isn't that hard compared to other more quantitative degrees. If you struggled with AS maths, then you might have issues.
Most of economics is about reasoning and explaining theories.
Although economics is difficult to apply in practice, the theory gives you a framework to work from in many situations. The uni is also good for economist jobs and certain investment banks.
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Having done an economics related degree at Lancaster, I can say economics isn't that hard compared to other more quantitative degrees. If you struggled with AS maths, then you might have issues.
Most of economics is about reasoning and explaining theories.
Although economics is difficult to apply in practice, the theory gives you a framework to work from in many situations. The uni is also good for economist jobs and certain investment banks.
Hi,
what degree did you do at lancaster. was it business economics. and Yes economics is about theories and I will probably be doing the less mathematical part of it. Could you give me an insight into the subject please.
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BenRyan99
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I'm currently in my final year of an economics degree btw. I think most students, especially newer students prefer macroeconomics to micro/business economics. So maybe it's worth checking out macroeconomics as well to see if it interests you. I can't say reading an a-level textbook is likely to excite you, it barely excites me and I've got a grad job lined up as an economist haha, it's probably better to check out YouTube videos as they're free and more interactive/visual.
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
I'm currently in my final year of an economics degree btw. I think most students, especially newer students prefer macroeconomics to micro/business economics. So maybe it's worth checking out macroeconomics as well to see if it interests you. I can't say reading an a-level textbook is likely to excite you, it barely excites me and I've got a grad job lined up as an economist haha, it's probably better to check out YouTube videos as they're free and more interactive/visual.
Thanks for getting back to me.Yeah will cheack out youtube videos and have seen a couple which I found instresting. Right now I've only look at microeconomic and will investigate macroeconomics. Reading out of a textbook is not that fun. I thibk the degree that lancaster offer is a joint degree so 3 quarters is economics modules and the rest business modules. Could you tell me what made you choose economics and what your passion is and what do you think of the degree overall like the career progression and the value of the degree.
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by Q and A)
Thanks for getting back to me.Yeah will cheack out youtube videos and have seen a couple which I found instresting. Right now I've only look at microeconomic and will investigate macroeconomics. Reading out of a textbook is not that fun. I thibk the degree that lancaster offer is a joint degree so 3 quarters is economics modules and the rest business modules. Could you tell me what made you choose economics and what your passion is and what do you think of the degree overall like the career progression and the value of the degree.
I studied economics at a-level, it was my favourite subject and the one I did best in so it made sense to do it at degree level. At a-level I liked how logical some of it was compared to other subjects and it sets you with a framework that allows you to make good predictions about the future and people's actions, whether it be through game theory or forecasting (which you learn more at degree level).

Now I'd say my interests within the subject lie within econometrics and some macroeconomics (mainly fiscal policy).

Economics degrees tend to be quite mathematical, I know that in my first year I had six modules, one each in macro and micro then 2 each in maths and then stats. The better uni you go to, the degree tends to become more mathematical so if you don't like maths (it often requires a-level maths) then try to pick a BA economics or a BA Economics & Finance course. Business economics also tends to have less maths in.

Career prospects tend to be pretty good, most people in my cohort got industrial placement years between the 2nd & 3rd year or took the investment banking route of spring weeks and summer internships. The vast majority have graduate schemes lined up despite the current job market. Your career progression will obviously depend on what industry you go into so I'm not sure I can give much insight into that. For me personally, I've got to finish my final year, then the place where I'm doing my economics grad scheme has said they will pay for me to do an economics masters before starting so I'll do that then actually start working for them. The progression from there seems to be that people stay for 3-5 years and then join investment banks, a few to hedge funds and some to economic consultancies. Generally it's a pretty high value degree, think it has the 2nd highest salary 10 years after graduation, behind medicine.
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
I studied economics at a-level, it was my favourite subject and the one I did best in so it made sense to do it at degree level. At a-level I liked how logical some of it was compared to other subjects and it sets you with a framework that allows you to make good predictions about the future and people's actions, whether it be through game theory or forecasting (which you learn more at degree level).

Now I'd say my interests within the subject lie within econometrics and some macroeconomics (mainly fiscal policy).

Economics degrees tend to be quite mathematical, I know that in my first year I had six modules, one each in macro and micro then 2 each in maths and then stats. The better uni you go to, the degree tends to become more mathematical so if you don't like maths (it often requires a-level maths) then try to pick a BA economics or a BA Economics & Finance course. Business economics also tends to have less maths in.

Career prospects tend to be pretty good, most people in my cohort got industrial placement years between the 2nd & 3rd year or took the investment banking route of spring weeks and summer internships. The vast majority have graduate schemes lined up despite the current job market. Your career progression will obviously depend on what industry you go into so I'm not sure I can give much insight into that. For me personally, I've got to finish my final year, then the place where I'm doing my economics grad scheme has said they will pay for me to do an economics masters before starting so I'll do that then actually start working for them. The progression from there seems to be that people stay for 3-5 years and then join investment banks, a few to hedge funds and some to economic consultancies. Generally it's a pretty high value degree, think it has the 2nd highest salary 10 years after graduation, behind medicine.
Yeah, I need to to do more research into economics and look at diffrent areas such as macro and micro and final policy. I tend to do a business economics BSC at University of Lancaster. They did say that it had abit of maths init like calcus but I can pick the units and there will say which will be less mathematical. im ok with maths and do have a passion and really enjoyed it at GCSE although I didnt get a good grade init. got a 4. Mostly forgot everything about Maths tho so would that be a problem. What parts did u really enjoy about economics at a level and at degree level. what company u are going to for ur grad scheme. after I graduate I want to either become a teacher at college teaching business or economics or go down the economic consultant route, or investment banking or acturial. The reason I want to do business economics is because I can go down the teaching route and if that doesn't work out I've got multiple other options available to me and Lancaster a very good uni. whats the average salary like for econ grads. or business economics grad and is the business economics grad still recognised
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BenRyan99
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(Original post by Q and A)
Yeah, I need to to do more research into economics and look at diffrent areas such as macro and micro and final policy. I tend to do a business economics BSC at University of Lancaster. They did say that it had abit of maths init like calcus but I can pick the units and there will say which will be less mathematical. im ok with maths and do have a passion and really enjoyed it at GCSE although I didnt get a good grade init. got a 4. Mostly forgot everything about Maths tho so would that be a problem. What parts did u really enjoy about economics at a level and at degree level. what company u are going to for ur grad scheme. after I graduate I want to either become a teacher at college teaching business or economics or go down the economic consultant route, or investment banking or acturial. The reason I want to do business economics is because I can go down the teaching route and if that doesn't work out I've got multiple other options available to me and Lancaster a very good uni. whats the average salary like for econ grads. or business economics grad and is the business economics grad still recognised
Private message me your questions if you want
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Q and A)
Hi,
what degree did you do at lancaster. was it business economics. and Yes economics is about theories and I will probably be doing the less mathematical part of it. Could you give me an insight into the subject please.
I did MSc Money Banking and Finance. However, I also did an economics related degree and an accounting degree before that.
The microeconomics as far as I can tell will introduce calculus concepts (mostly differentiation to demonstrate the models).
The econometric and research modules will introduce regression, normal distribution i.e. AS Level stats
Mathematical economics is probably the hardest module as it will look into difference, differential equations as well as matrices (Further Maths and advanced calculus)
Principles of Economics might have a few concepts that require you to understand differentiation.
The Accounting and Finance module should be relatively straight forward with minimal maths, although it does depend on what equations they will give you. As the degree I did focused more on bond and option pricing, the equations were more advanced. However, you shouldn't come across many of those here, if at all.

As far as I can tell from the rest of the degree, most of it will require straightforward GCSE maths i.e. ratios, adding, subtracting, straight lines using graphs

What do you specifically want to know?
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