mischa.star
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hiya, just in the process of applying for university and was wondering if anyone could explain the difference in a single honours psychology (BSc) and joint honours psychology and neuroscience (MSci) degree, and whether one is better than the other.
(e.g. would a joint degree (with neuroscience) be looked on more favorably over one which is a single honours (just psychology) but perhaps with a year in industry.)
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bones-mccoy
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What do you want to do after uni?
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sophsrandall
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(Original post by mischa.star)
hiya, just in the process of applying for university and was wondering if anyone could explain the difference in a single honours psychology (BSc) and joint honours psychology and neuroscience (MSci) degree, and whether one is better than the other.
(e.g. would a joint degree (with neuroscience) be looked on more favorably over one which is a single honours (just psychology) but perhaps with a year in industry.)
Hi, the degrees you mention seem to be totally different in terms of one being a BSc (bachelors level) and one being an MSCi (masters level), in that case the MSCi is a higher level of degree than the BSc but usually to do a masters you would already need a bachelors in a relevant subject or the course will be an extra year than the bachelors. Either way, the MSci will be a lot more work so it's worth considering whether you're willing to put that in.

With the joint honours, as some who got their BSc in Psychology and Neuroscience - don't worry about what looks better and only do a joint honours if you're truly interested in neuroscience. My neuroscience modules were consistently the hardest and most gruelling ones which was fine because I enjoyed the subject however I know a lot of people that dropped out of them or really struggled to get the grades they needed. Neuroscience is difficult, and unlike psychology it doesn't always relate specifically to the brain or to human behaviour - I spent hours looking at the CPG patterns of lobster stomachs, and the movement of snails for example.

Honestly I don't think employers care too much about single vs joint honours unless you want to go into a neuroscience related field in the future - so do whatever you're the most interested in because 3 years is a long time to study something very difficult if it's not even something that you enjoy
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mischa.star
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(Original post by sophsrandall)
Hi, the degrees you mention seem to be totally different in terms of one being a BSc (bachelors level) and one being an MSCi (masters level), in that case the MSCi is a higher level of degree than the BSc but usually to do a masters you would already need a bachelors in a relevant subject or the course will be an extra year than the bachelors. Either way, the MSci will be a lot more work so it's worth considering whether you're willing to put that in.

With the joint honours, as some who got their BSc in Psychology and Neuroscience - don't worry about what looks better and only do a joint honours if you're truly interested in neuroscience. My neuroscience modules were consistently the hardest and most gruelling ones which was fine because I enjoyed the subject however I know a lot of people that dropped out of them or really struggled to get the grades they needed. Neuroscience is difficult, and unlike psychology it doesn't always relate specifically to the brain or to human behaviour - I spent hours looking at the CPG patterns of lobster stomachs, and the movement of snails for example.

Honestly I don't think employers care too much about single vs joint honours unless you want to go into a neuroscience related field in the future - so do whatever you're the most interested in because 3 years is a long time to study something very difficult if it's not even something that you enjoy
Thank you, this is really useful --- I do think I would find neuroscience interesting and I have found some courses that offer the joint honors as a BSc - which uni did you go to and would you recommend it?
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mischa.star
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(Original post by bones-mccoy)
What do you want to do after uni?
Hopefully clinical psychology (which requires further study)
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by mischa.star)
Hopefully clinical psychology (which requires further study)
As long as you get a first or 2.1 in your degree, a good amount of varied, relevant experience is far more important to get onto the DClinPsy
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sophsrandall
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(Original post by mischa.star)
Thank you, this is really useful --- I do think I would find neuroscience interesting and I have found some courses that offer the joint honors as a BSc - which uni did you go to and would you recommend it?
No problem I went to Sussex and loved it, one of the biggest draws for me was having Andy Field teaching statistics which made it a lot easier. If it helps, I saw you're looking at clinical psychology, I also did an MSc at Sussex afterwards in clinical psychology and am now applying for the DClinPsy and I've had no issues getting work experience so choosing a joint honours certainly shouldn't hold you back from any of that.
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bones-mccoy
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(Original post by sophsrandall)
No problem I went to Sussex and loved it, one of the biggest draws for me was having Andy Field teaching statistics which made it a lot easier. If it helps, I saw you're looking at clinical psychology, I also did an MSc at Sussex afterwards in clinical psychology and am now applying for the DClinPsy and I've had no issues getting work experience so choosing a joint honours certainly shouldn't hold you back from any of that.
Andy Field is great! I bought his SPSS textbook second hand for my MSc and it was really helpful, very jealous of you actually being taught by him!
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