AveragexStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
We are currently doing musculoskeletal system in Exeter however, we are often given information without much context such as these are the names of the 6 bones in the wrist or here is the entire neurovascular system in the Brachial Plexus.
Whilst I have no issue with remembering what is shown, What is the purpose of this information? Am I supposed to learn the long list of anatomical names or have an acknowledgement that they exist. Our University doesn't tell us what we are meant to know because they want to encourage independent learning however I am concerned that the time spend in the memorisation of these facts will lead to it being wasted. Plus the majority doesn't lead to us becoming better doctors.

Any help will be appreciated
0
reply
ecolier
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
(Original post by AveragexStudent)
We are currently doing musculoskeletal system in Exeter however, we are often given information without much context such as these are the names of the 6 bones in the wrist or here is the entire neurovascular system in the Brachial Plexus.
Whilst I have no issue with remembering what is shown, What is the purpose of this information? Am I supposed to learn the long list of anatomical names or have an acknowledgement that they exist. Our University doesn't tell us what we are meant to know because they want to encourage independent learning however I am concerned that the time spend in the memorisation of these facts will lead to it being wasted. Plus the majority doesn't lead to us becoming better doctors.

Any help will be appreciated
I think you'll need to ask your medical school what you're supposed to learn for Year One because everywhere works differently - you are absolutely right that your med school may not expect you to know everything by June 2021.

Do bear in mind that you will need to know the brachial plexus and recall the wrist bone names for finals (or even earlier).

The purposes of this information is so that you know what the problem is: if an old lady who has fallen and complains of several hand pain and swelling, and you're the clerking FY1 doctor on the surgical admissions unit; or if someone complains of numbness in the hand / arm and they had a fall from a tree after grabbing on to a branch.

You do need to know anatomy, and it will make you a better FY1 (remember, med schools are there to make FY1s - not consultant psychiatrists / GPs etc.) so you'll need to know a bit of everything.
1
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#3
Report 3 months ago
#3
(Original post by AveragexStudent)
We are currently doing musculoskeletal system in Exeter however, we are often given information without much context such as these are the names of the 6 bones in the wrist or here is the entire neurovascular system in the Brachial Plexus.
Whilst I have no issue with remembering what is shown, What is the purpose of this information? Am I supposed to learn the long list of anatomical names or have an acknowledgement that they exist. Our University doesn't tell us what we are meant to know because they want to encourage independent learning however I am concerned that the time spend in the memorisation of these facts will lead to it being wasted. Plus the majority doesn't lead to us becoming better doctors.

Any help will be appreciated
Have they given you learning objectives?

There are more than six bones in the wrist btw.

Plus the majority doesn't lead to us becoming better doctors.
This is a common feeling during pre-clinical medicine (though I would give it more than a month!). It will make more sense as you progress in your career.

It's fine to moan about it and we've all been there, but I would be careful not to fall into the trap of taking shortcuts. It is relevant and it does help you become a better doctor - not least because your job is to be more knowledgeable than all the non-doctors in your future department or practice (who didn't go to medical school).
1
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#4
Report 3 months ago
#4
(Original post by AveragexStudent)
We are currently doing musculoskeletal system in Exeter however, we are often given information without much context such as these are the names of the 6 bones in the wrist or here is the entire neurovascular system in the Brachial Plexus.
Whilst I have no issue with remembering what is shown, What is the purpose of this information? Am I supposed to learn the long list of anatomical names or have an acknowledgement that they exist. Our University doesn't tell us what we are meant to know because they want to encourage independent learning however I am concerned that the time spend in the memorisation of these facts will lead to it being wasted. Plus the majority doesn't lead to us becoming better doctors.

Any help will be appreciated
Really depends on the med school I'm afraid.

As far as I'm concerned, if there are no clear learning objectives, it is a terrible course. How can a learner know what to learn, if they have no relevant experience to guide them. The problem with constructivism (i.e. PBL), is that the whole principle behind it is that learners have to create their own understanding it cannot be imparted from others. So... yeah.

Ask the older years maybe?
1
reply
AveragexStudent
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#5
(Original post by Democracy)
Have they given you learning objectives?

There are more than six bones in the wrist btw.



This is a common feeling during pre-clinical medicine (though I would give it more than a month!). It will make more sense as you progress in your career.

It's fine to moan about it and we've all been there, but I would be careful not to fall into the trap of taking shortcuts. It is relevant and it does help you become a better doctor - not least because your job is to be more knowledgeable than all the non-doctors in your future department or practice (who didn't go to medical school).
Lol just realised there are 8 bones! but thank you to everyone that has posted
The main thing I understand is that I'm going to have to focus on things which could be potentially clinically relevant for memorisation
Also simply, asking for higher years advice would probably clear a lot of things up...
1
reply
Democracy
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 3 months ago
#6
(Original post by AveragexStudent)
Lol just realised there are 8 bones! but thank you to everyone that has posted
The main thing I understand is that I'm going to have to focus on things which could be potentially clinically relevant for memorisation
Also simply, asking for higher years advice would probably clear a lot of things up...
Yes, absolutely try to make your learning clinically oriented and prioritise high yield info but without dismissing everything else - it's a balancing act and you'll eventually get the hang of it.

Re the wrist: some lovers try positions that they can't handle.
0
reply
Hudl
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
(Original post by AveragexStudent)
We are currently doing musculoskeletal system in Exeter however, we are often given information without much context such as these are the names of the 6 bones in the wrist or here is the entire neurovascular system in the Brachial Plexus.
Whilst I have no issue with remembering what is shown, What is the purpose of this information? Am I supposed to learn the long list of anatomical names or have an acknowledgement that they exist. Our University doesn't tell us what we are meant to know because they want to encourage independent learning however I am concerned that the time spend in the memorisation of these facts will lead to it being wasted. Plus the majority doesn't lead to us becoming better doctors.

Any help will be appreciated
As a FY1 now, a lot of the info we learnt at medical school was not particularly important but then again a lot are. At medical school you're not going to fully appreciate what you need to know especially if you are on a PBL course. However, the truth of the matter is you do actually need to know a lot of it and you only appreciate the understanding or knowledge you're getting from it in retrospect. You also have to bear in mind that medical school is training all sort of Doctors, from the future leaders of advancements in healthcare to a standard doctor and appreciation for these details is more important for the former.

In terms of knowing what you need for exams, use your tutors, lecturers + lecture slides, older years and general medicine websites. because there is also a disparity sometimes in what your medical school focuses on for exams and what is actually a good standard to learn to make you comparable to others at other medical schools/abroad.

Like someone said above, it is also this teaching, learning and training that differentiates us as Doctors from advanced nursing practitioners and physician associates etc.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you have the space and resources you need to succeed in home learning?

Yes I have everything I need (215)
56.73%
I don't have everything I need (164)
43.27%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed