Gabriele25
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Hey guys, I'm new to the forum. I've seen some threads about target schools and semi target, yet I think this doesn't apply to me because my situation is a bit different.

So I'm an Italian student studying in Rome, I'm at the last year of my bachelor which is mostly an Italian law course with some economics / business courses (BA, Statistics, Micro and Macro economics, Public Finances, Political Economy) and some human sciences like Sociology, History and Political Sciences.

I won't explain here why I didn't choose an economics / business bachelor but I want to work in the financial field. The biggest problem is that most target schools require a bachelor with quantitative courses (the only quant course I did is Statistics) and GMAT/GRE (which I don't have). Being in Italy, my greatest opportunities are Bocconi and LUISS, yet I would like to know if I got any better opportunities outside Italy. I've been looking into UK universities and some of them would accept me, I just don't know if they are good or it's better for me to just stay in Italy and get the master here.

Could you tell me if these schools are actually good for working in finance or they just accept any international student because of the enormous fees you pay them?

- Cranfield, Bath, Strathclyde, Newcastle, Birmingham, Queen Mary, Kent, Sussex, SOAS London, London Metropolitan, Kingston London, MMU, Aston

My others European options are:

Antwerp (Belgium), Copenhagen BS (Denmark), Lund (Sweden), Norwegian BS (Norway), Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland), Vaasa - Oulu - Hanken (Finland), Tor Vergata (Italy)


I'd also like to know if I will be able to get a student loan in the UK in 2021, when EU students will be enrolled as International Students and not as Home students. My budget to pay my master is of around €25000, so I will probably need a loan in the UK.



Edit: I didn't consider US and Canada universities because:

Admission rates are way lower than European standards

Fees are so high I don't know if I can take a loan that big

I don't know if I will manage to get a Visa for September 2021

If I'm wrong and I got more chances there, studying in the US (and working) would be an absolute dream for me.
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MindMax2000
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The sort of MSc Finance programs I woud recommend looking into are those at Oxford, UCL, LSE, Warwick, and LSBF. As far as I know, only LSE requires a GMAT or GRE for entry; the other universities don't, however, I would think LSE's master's are probably the most expensive from the list (roughly £20k). GMATs and GREs can be prepared for by a number of course providers e.g. Kaplan, BBP, etc. over the course of a month. However, as these tests are also recognised for MBAs and PhDs, the courses can get a bit expensive.

From the list of universities you have provided, I have looked into QM and Birmingham. Both of which are good as far as I know. Bath has a good reputation for business, but I would not know about their Finance programs. Cranfield is good from what I hear for business, but I am not sure of its Finance programs.

I think the reason why some ask for a quantitative undergraduate degree is because of the quantitative methods module (a lot of stats) and some modules requiring you to understand mathematical notation e.g. Black-Scholes-Merton Model, asset pricing. Beyond that, I don't think they will pressure you too much. If you haven't done a quantitative degree, I don't think it's the end of the world. It's best to phone up the admissions office for confirmation.

The finance field is varied and large with various roles. Most of those roles require people skills and the ability to sell. For most employers I have come across, they will expect you to have high grades, from the best universities, and know which role you're applying for and why. The more important thing would be the experience and having a good network - high net worth individuals, funds, people in the finance industry. The London, Manchester, and Edinburgh universities should provide you with more opportunities to network in the UK. Most roles will also have their specialised qualification for the role you apply for e.g. CFA for asset and investment management, CQF for quants, ACCA/ACA/CIMA for accounting. You might want to research the particular roles first and confirm with the laws of the country you wish to work in.

I am not sure about the universities in the US, but from my American friends, they would expect high grades from the best universities. Unsurprisingly, Ivy League universities will be preferred. Some roles will ask for an MBA, but you need to be careful of getting one should you wish to.
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Gabriele25
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
The sort of MSc Finance programs I woud recommend looking into are those at Oxford, UCL, LSE, Warwick, and LSBF. As far as I know, only LSE requires a GMAT or GRE for entry; the other universities don't, however, I would think LSE's master's are probably the most expensive from the list (roughly £20k). GMATs and GREs can be prepared for by a number of course providers e.g. Kaplan, BBP, etc. over the course of a month. However, as these tests are also recognised for MBAs and PhDs, the courses can get a bit expensive.

From the list of universities you have provided, I have looked into QM and Birmingham. Both of which are good as far as I know. Bath has a good reputation for business, but I would not know about their Finance programs. Cranfield is good from what I hear for business, but I am not sure of its Finance programs.

I think the reason why some ask for a quantitative undergraduate degree is because of the quantitative methods module (a lot of stats) and some modules requiring you to understand mathematical notation e.g. Black-Scholes-Merton Model, asset pricing. Beyond that, I don't think they will pressure you too much. If you haven't done a quantitative degree, I don't think it's the end of the world. It's best to phone up the admissions office for confirmation.

The finance field is varied and large with various roles. Most of those roles require people skills and the ability to sell. For most employers I have come across, they will expect you to have high grades, from the best universities, and know which role you're applying for and why. The more important thing would be the experience and having a good network - high net worth individuals, funds, people in the finance industry. The London, Manchester, and Edinburgh universities should provide you with more opportunities to network in the UK. Most roles will also have their specialised qualification for the role you apply for e.g. CFA for asset and investment management, CQF for quants, ACCA/ACA/CIMA for accounting. You might want to research the particular roles first and confirm with the laws of the country you wish to work in.

I am not sure about the universities in the US, but from my American friends, they would expect high grades from the best universities. Unsurprisingly, Ivy League universities will be preferred. Some roles will ask for an MBA, but you need to be careful of getting one should you wish to.
Thanks for your answer. I will take a look and see if I go any chances in target schools without applying for a finance course. What about LSBF? I read different opinions on that school, and all of their finance courses are online. I don't know if it's a good target school or not.
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Gabriele25)
Thanks for your answer. I will take a look and see if I go any chances in target schools without applying for a finance course. What about LSBF? I read different opinions on that school, and all of their finance courses are online. I don't know if it's a good target school or not.
I haven't looked deeply into it, but I've heard of their reputation. It's best if you get a second opinion on it.
As far as I know, their business school is good though.
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BenRyan99
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In my opinion I don't quite understand why you want to come to the UK so much, there's only a few universities that I'd rank as better than Bocconi. They would be Oxford's MFE, LSE's courses in finance, finance and economics, then finance and PE and then London business school's MFA. I'd would say bocconi is probably equal to UCL, Warwick and Cambridge for their masters courses. So I certainly wouldn't pick one of the unis you listed over some of the European schools like SSE, BGSE, TSE, Bocconi and Mannheim.

As for LSBF, it's an absolutely trash uni haha, definitely don't go there. I think people get mixed up between LBS and LSBF. LBS is world class institution, probably top 2 for finance in the UK whereas LSBF would probably be about 60th in the UK.
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Gabriele25
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(Original post by BenRyan99)
In my opinion I don't quite understand why you want to come to the UK so much, there's only a few universities that I'd rank as better than Bocconi. They would be Oxford's MFE, LSE's courses in finance, finance and economics, then finance and PE and then London business school's MFA. I'd would say bocconi is probably equal to UCL, Warwick and Cambridge for their masters courses. So I certainly wouldn't pick one of the unis you listed over some of the European schools like SSE, BGSE, TSE, Bocconi and Mannheim.

As for LSBF, it's an absolutely trash uni haha, definitely don't go there. I think people get mixed up between LBS and LSBF. LBS is world class institution, probably top 2 for finance in the UK whereas LSBF would probably be about 60th in the UK.
They are my second option of course, I will try my best to get into Bocconi. But I wanted to know as second options, which of these universities could be better for me.
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Aston University
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(Original post by Gabriele25)
Hey guys, I'm new to the forum. I've seen some threads about target schools and semi target, yet I think this doesn't apply to me because my situation is a bit different.

So I'm an Italian student studying in Rome, I'm at the last year of my bachelor which is mostly an Italian law course with some economics / business courses (BA, Statistics, Micro and Macro economics, Public Finances, Political Economy) and some human sciences like Sociology, History and Political Sciences.

I won't explain here why I didn't choose an economics / business bachelor but I want to work in the financial field. The biggest problem is that most target schools require a bachelor with quantitative courses (the only quant course I did is Statistics) and GMAT/GRE (which I don't have). Being in Italy, my greatest opportunities are Bocconi and LUISS, yet I would like to know if I got any better opportunities outside Italy. I've been looking into UK universities and some of them would accept me, I just don't know if they are good or it's better for me to just stay in Italy and get the master here.

Could you tell me if these schools are actually good for working in finance or they just accept any international student because of the enormous fees you pay them?

- Cranfield, Bath, Strathclyde, Newcastle, Birmingham, Queen Mary, Kent, Sussex, SOAS London, London Metropolitan, Kingston London, MMU, Aston

My others European options are:

Antwerp (Belgium), Copenhagen BS (Denmark), Lund (Sweden), Norwegian BS (Norway), Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland), Vaasa - Oulu - Hanken (Finland), Tor Vergata (Italy)


I'd also like to know if I will be able to get a student loan in the UK in 2021, when EU students will be enrolled as International Students and not as Home students. My budget to pay my master is of around €25000, so I will probably need a loan in the UK.



Edit: I didn't consider US and Canada universities because:

Admission rates are way lower than European standards

Fees are so high I don't know if I can take a loan that big

I don't know if I will manage to get a Visa for September 2021

If I'm wrong and I got more chances there, studying in the US (and working) would be an absolute dream for me.
Hi there,
The Finance MSc degree at Aston is a challenging and exciting one, there’s a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials, which provide you with key concepts in investments, assets valuation and risk management techniques. You’ll also get the chance to utilise our state-of-the-art trading room facility. You’ll gain hands-on experience working with the software used in the banking sector to access real-time financial and economic data. You can observe market fluctuations as well as understand how to measure and manage financial risk.

Having not actually studied finance I can't say what it's like being a finance student, but being an Aston student comes with excellent staff and student support and a careers and placements team dedicated to helping you improve your employability as well as securing both placement and graduate jobs.

I hope this has helped and I wish you all the best with your applications

*Ethel
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Manchester Metropolitan University
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(Original post by Gabriele25)
Hey guys, I'm new to the forum. I've seen some threads about target schools and semi target, yet I think this doesn't apply to me because my situation is a bit different.

So I'm an Italian student studying in Rome, I'm at the last year of my bachelor which is mostly an Italian law course with some economics / business courses (BA, Statistics, Micro and Macro economics, Public Finances, Political Economy) and some human sciences like Sociology, History and Political Sciences.

I won't explain here why I didn't choose an economics / business bachelor but I want to work in the financial field. The biggest problem is that most target schools require a bachelor with quantitative courses (the only quant course I did is Statistics) and GMAT/GRE (which I don't have). Being in Italy, my greatest opportunities are Bocconi and LUISS, yet I would like to know if I got any better opportunities outside Italy. I've been looking into UK universities and some of them would accept me, I just don't know if they are good or it's better for me to just stay in Italy and get the master here.

Could you tell me if these schools are actually good for working in finance or they just accept any international student because of the enormous fees you pay them?

- Cranfield, Bath, Strathclyde, Newcastle, Birmingham, Queen Mary, Kent, Sussex, SOAS London, London Metropolitan, Kingston London, MMU, Aston

My others European options are:

Antwerp (Belgium), Copenhagen BS (Denmark), Lund (Sweden), Norwegian BS (Norway), Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland), Vaasa - Oulu - Hanken (Finland), Tor Vergata (Italy)


I'd also like to know if I will be able to get a student loan in the UK in 2021, when EU students will be enrolled as International Students and not as Home students. My budget to pay my master is of around €25000, so I will probably need a loan in the UK.



Edit: I didn't consider US and Canada universities because:

Admission rates are way lower than European standards

Fees are so high I don't know if I can take a loan that big

I don't know if I will manage to get a Visa for September 2021

If I'm wrong and I got more chances there, studying in the US (and working) would be an absolute dream for me.
Hi Gabriele25 :hello:,

Firstly, welcome to The Student Room I hope you can find answers to your questions here and I hope my contribution helps!

Regarding studying MSc Finance or related courses, most universities will require applicants to hold a relevant undergraduate degree. For example, at Manchester Met (MMU), we require a minimum of a 2:2 in a business, economics or finance related degree. If you have studied modules in any of these subjects, the admissions team will examine their content and will assess whether they're eligible to provide you admissions to the postgraduate course within our triple-accredited Business School.

If you would like to find out more about our postgraduate courses and speak to the academic tutors and some of our current students, you can register your attendance to one of our Online Open Days here.

With regards to EU Student Finance, we currently know that EU citizens must have pre-settled or settled status to live in the UK to be eligible to student finance. Therefore any EU citizen who does not meet this criteria, won't have access to loans from Student Finance. I would recommend visiting the Student Finance website for further updates.

I hope this helps with your search for your postgraduate studies .

Luca
Last edited by Manchester Metropolitan University; 1 month ago
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Cranfield University
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(Original post by Gabriele25)
Hey guys, I'm new to the forum. I've seen some threads about target schools and semi target, yet I think this doesn't apply to me because my situation is a bit different.

So I'm an Italian student studying in Rome, I'm at the last year of my bachelor which is mostly an Italian law course with some economics / business courses (BA, Statistics, Micro and Macro economics, Public Finances, Political Economy) and some human sciences like Sociology, History and Political Sciences.

I won't explain here why I didn't choose an economics / business bachelor but I want to work in the financial field. The biggest problem is that most target schools require a bachelor with quantitative courses (the only quant course I did is Statistics) and GMAT/GRE (which I don't have). Being in Italy, my greatest opportunities are Bocconi and LUISS, yet I would like to know if I got any better opportunities outside Italy. I've been looking into UK universities and some of them would accept me, I just don't know if they are good or it's better for me to just stay in Italy and get the master here.

Could you tell me if these schools are actually good for working in finance or they just accept any international student because of the enormous fees you pay them?

- Cranfield, Bath, Strathclyde, Newcastle, Birmingham, Queen Mary, Kent, Sussex, SOAS London, London Metropolitan, Kingston London, MMU, Aston

My others European options are:

Antwerp (Belgium), Copenhagen BS (Denmark), Lund (Sweden), Norwegian BS (Norway), Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland), Vaasa - Oulu - Hanken (Finland), Tor Vergata (Italy)


I'd also like to know if I will be able to get a student loan in the UK in 2021, when EU students will be enrolled as International Students and not as Home students. My budget to pay my master is of around €25000, so I will probably need a loan in the UK.



Edit: I didn't consider US and Canada universities because:

Admission rates are way lower than European standards

Fees are so high I don't know if I can take a loan that big

I don't know if I will manage to get a Visa for September 2021

If I'm wrong and I got more chances there, studying in the US (and working) would be an absolute dream for me.
Hey Gabriele25!

I'm here with all the other university reps!
Have you looked at what courses Cranfield offer in the field you're interested in?
I guess the Investment Management MSc is probably you're best bet, but we have a few others too. (https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/som/mast...ent-management).

I did not study in SoM (School of Management) here so can't comment on this course particularly, however there's information on the page I listed above, including some of the jobs the graduates went on to, plus you can read from current and past students on our blogs: https://blogs.cranfield.ac.uk/?s=finance.

Cranfield is actually a very diverse place, a huge amount of our students are international / non-UK, so it's not that we accept every international student that applied because they pay more, we'd be overflowing if we did! You can see from the details for each course on the website the nationality diversity of students. For the Investment Management and Finance and Management MSc last year there were 20 different nationalities in a cohort of 89.

Hope this helps, if you have any other questions please ask

Katherine
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f.ga010301
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(Original post by Gabriele25)
Hey guys, I'm new to the forum. I've seen some threads about target schools and semi target, yet I think this doesn't apply to me because my situation is a bit different.

So I'm an Italian student studying in Rome, I'm at the last year of my bachelor which is mostly an Italian law course with some economics / business courses (BA, Statistics, Micro and Macro economics, Public Finances, Political Economy) and some human sciences like Sociology, History and Political Sciences.

I won't explain here why I didn't choose an economics / business bachelor but I want to work in the financial field. The biggest problem is that most target schools require a bachelor with quantitative courses (the only quant course I did is Statistics) and GMAT/GRE (which I don't have). Being in Italy, my greatest opportunities are Bocconi and LUISS, yet I would like to know if I got any better opportunities outside Italy. I've been looking into UK universities and some of them would accept me, I just don't know if they are good or it's better for me to just stay in Italy and get the master here.

Could you tell me if these schools are actually good for working in finance or they just accept any international student because of the enormous fees you pay them?

- Cranfield, Bath, Strathclyde, Newcastle, Birmingham, Queen Mary, Kent, Sussex, SOAS London, London Metropolitan, Kingston London, MMU, Aston

My others European options are:

Antwerp (Belgium), Copenhagen BS (Denmark), Lund (Sweden), Norwegian BS (Norway), Università della Svizzera Italiana (Switzerland), Vaasa - Oulu - Hanken (Finland), Tor Vergata (Italy)


I'd also like to know if I will be able to get a student loan in the UK in 2021, when EU students will be enrolled as International Students and not as Home students. My budget to pay my master is of around €25000, so I will probably need a loan in the UK.



Edit: I didn't consider US and Canada universities because:

Admission rates are way lower than European standards

Fees are so high I don't know if I can take a loan that big

I don't know if I will manage to get a Visa for September 2021

If I'm wrong and I got more chances there, studying in the US (and working) would be an absolute dream for me.
Hey, I am a student at London Metropolitan University. London Met has a great International Banking and Finance MSc course. They have designed the course to meet the needs of the international financial community and the City of London, increasing your job prospects after graduation. London met has a great community feel and everyone is so friendly which is exactly what you need when studying for a degree. lecturers are really hands-on and constantly checking up with you to see your progress and always willing to help. I think it would be helpful to point out that the university is holding an Online Postgraduate Study Guide event on Tuesday 1st December from 5.15 pm-6.15 pm. The Postgraduate Study Guide is the perfect opportunity to find out everything you need to know about postgraduate life at London Met. you can book your place by visiting the International Banking and Finance MSc course webpage on the London Met site and you will find all the info there. I hope this helps and if you have any questions please feel free to ask!
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BenRyan99
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Please don't listen to all these trash unis trying to sell you their overpriced degrees, only Cranfield is semi-reputable but I wouldn't recommend it. Manchester met, London met and Aston are terrible lol, I'm sure you know the unis in the UK that are worth going to beyond those in Europe
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University of Bath Postgraduate
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Hi Gabriele25

Welcome to The Student Room and I'm glad to hear you're considering studying your postgraduate degree in finance at the University of Bath!

I don't study Finance in particular, so I won't be able to give my opinion of the course. However, I've just glanced over the course page, which can be found here, https://management-masters.bath.ac.uk/course/finance/, and it looks like there are a range of modules designed for graduates from a range of academic backgrounds. In terms of the entry requirements, you need to have a 2:1 (or international equivalent) in your undergraduate degree, but from any discipline with quantitative content. Last year, 108 students were enrolled on the course, of 13 different nationalities and from a range of different academic backgrounds.

I am a current postgraduate student at Bath, and I completed my undergraduate degree here. So, hopefully I'll be able to help by telling you a little bit about student life at Bath. With regards to studying, on my course (and most courses), we currently have 4 hours of in person teaching per week and the rest have been online interactive classes this year. The student body at Bath is incredibly diverse, and The Students' Union has some great student groups for students from different backgrounds (there's even an Italian Society)!

Bath itself is really beautiful and and a very safe place to live. It is fairly small but it's also only a 15 minute train journey from Bristol. Overall, I've really loved living in Bath over the past 4 years, and I think it's a great place to experience student life - particularly as a postgraduate student.

I hope this has helped and feel free to ask any questions!

Meg
Msc Applied Clinical Psychology
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