Relative Atomic Mass - general question

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NaBrO
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If all relative atomic masses are relative to 1/12 of an atom of Carbon-12, does that mean that their relative atomic mass isn't their true mass? If so, how do we find the true mass?
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lordaxil
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(Original post by NaBrO)
If all relative atomic masses are relative to 1/12 of an atom of Carbon-12, does that mean that their relative atomic mass isn't their true mass? If so, how do we find the true mass?
What do you mean by "true mass"?

In the end, all masses, and indeed all physical units, have to have a base definition or be measured relative to some standard. Up until recently, the kilogram was defined with reference to a bar of platinum-iridium sitting in a vault in Paris. It's now defined in terms of the second and the metre, based on fixed fundamental constants of nature.

My point is that all masses are relative in the end, and so don't worry too much that atomic weights use a relative scale. There is no other way.
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NaBrO
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(Original post by lordaxil)
What do you mean by "true mass"?

In the end, all masses, and indeed all physical units, have to have a base definition or be measured relative to some standard. Up until recently, the kilogram was defined with reference to a bar of platinum-iridium sitting in a vault in Paris. It's now defined in terms of the second and the metre, based on fixed fundamental constants of nature.

My point is that all masses are relative in the end, and so don't worry too much that atomic weights use a relative scale. There is no other way.
I see... thank you
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charco
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(Original post by NaBrO)
If all relative atomic masses are relative to 1/12 of an atom of Carbon-12, does that mean that their relative atomic mass isn't their true mass? If so, how do we find the true mass?
You can find the "true" mass of any isotope (in grams) by dividing the relative mass of the isotope by Avogadro's number.

Hence, one atom of 12C has a mass of 1.9926 x 10-23 g
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