jellyfish1233
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#1
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#1
ok so this is a kinda stupid question but what are undulipodia and whats the difference between them and flagellum and cilia?
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OxFossil
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(Original post by jellyfish1233)
ok so this is a kinda stupid question but what are undulipodia and whats the difference between them and flagellum and cilia?
It's a term proposed to eliminate the confusion between eukaryote flagella and cilia on the one hand and prokaryote flagella on the other.

In eukaryotes, flagella and cilia both have a 9+2 microtubule made of tubullin surrounded by the plasma membrane and powered by a basal body that runs on ATP.

Prokaryote flagella look very similar, but are made of flagellin and covered by the plasmalemma. They are also powered by a basal body, but run on proton gradients.

The idea is that using the term 'flagella' to cover both eukaryote flagella and prokaryote flagella gives a misleading idea that they are the same structure. So the term "undulipodium" was proposed to replace it in eukaryotes, leaving only prokaryotes with the term "flagella".

According to wiki, it hasn't caught on.
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macpatgh-Sheldon
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(Original post by OxFossil)
It's a term proposed to eliminate the confusion between eukaryote flagella and cilia on the one hand and prokaryote flagella on the other.

In eukaryotes, flagella and cilia both have a 9+2 microtubule made of tubullin surrounded by the plasma membrane and powered by a basal body that runs on ATP.

Prokaryote flagella look very similar, but are made of flagellin and covered by the plasmalemma. They are also powered by a basal body, but run on proton gradients.

The idea is that using the term 'flagella' to cover both eukaryote flagella and prokaryote flagella gives a misleading idea that they are the same structure. So the term "undulipodium" was proposed to replace it in eukaryotes, leaving only prokaryotes with the term "flagella".

According to wiki, it hasn't caught on.
Thank you, archaeological specimen (sorry! ) - your answer explains why I had never heard of it, although I was about to say to OP that podo means legs/feet, and unduli probably refers to "undulating" or "beating" motion.
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OxFossil
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(Original post by macpatgh-Sheldon)
Thank you, archaeological specimen (sorry! ) - your answer explains why I had never heard of it, although I was about to say to OP that podo means legs/feet, and unduli probably refers to "undulating" or "beating" motion.
You're welcome. Just to add to the confusion, the term has been also sometimes been used to mean exactly the opposite - the homology of all flagellar structures in eukaryotes and prokaryotes!
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jellyfish1233
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#5
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by OxFossil)
It's a term proposed to eliminate the confusion between eukaryote flagella and cilia on the one hand and prokaryote flagella on the other.

In eukaryotes, flagella and cilia both have a 9+2 microtubule made of tubullin surrounded by the plasma membrane and powered by a basal body that runs on ATP.

Prokaryote flagella look very similar, but are made of flagellin and covered by the plasmalemma. They are also powered by a basal body, but run on proton gradients.

The idea is that using the term 'flagella' to cover both eukaryote flagella and prokaryote flagella gives a misleading idea that they are the same structure. So the term "undulipodium" was proposed to replace it in eukaryotes, leaving only prokaryotes with the term "flagella".

According to wiki, it hasn't caught on.
omg amazing, thank you so much! makes sense now as I couldn't find much information about this. thanks for your help
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