Decisions being made on potential 'Pre-Christmas Lockdown' to allow students home

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StrawberryDreams
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-54548523

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...h-universities

A potential 'pre-christmas lockdown' could take place before students head home for the holidays to allow them to do so safely.

The BBC said:

'The government said the risk of spreading the virus must be minimised.

But the University and College Union described the measures as "unworkable".

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: "All students will be able to go home at Christmas if they so choose.
"However, if students are travelling home, we must ensure they do so in a way which minimises the risks of spreading the virus, and the date when universities must stop in-person teaching will be an important part of this.

"We will set out details on this shortly."

The department gave no details on whether the measures would be for all universities in England or just those in virus hotspots.'


What do you think of these potential plans?

Is heading home for Christmas essential for you, and would you stop any in-person teaching you may be having early to be able to do so?

What do you think about potential plans to limit in-person mixing between students and the wider community before the students head home for Christmas? Do you think this is feasible, or will guidelines be difficult to adhere to?

Let us know your thoughts below!
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fallen_acorns
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I don't think they have much of a choice. We know that the virus has spread within student populations, and Christmas poses a potential disaster.

In the same week you might have tens of thousands of students all returning home to their families at the same times, most of which will be in their 50s, 60s or older if they live with grandparents. All at the same time.. all in the middle of winter. Its a perfect storm for virus cases..

I've posted about it on here before, but what the goverments doing is about all they can. If you want to go home - isolate for at least 10 days first. That's the best and easiest way to make sure that cases don't transfer back to families and we don't see a spike just a week or two before Christmas. (which, restrictions depending, would already be the worse time anyway due to the increase in families and people mixing).
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PQ
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(Original post by StrawberryDreams)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-54548523

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...h-universities

A potential 'pre-christmas lockdown' could take place before students head home for the holidays to allow them to do so safely.

The BBC said:

'The government said the risk of spreading the virus must be minimised.

But the University and College Union described the measures as "unworkable".

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: "All students will be able to go home at Christmas if they so choose.
"However, if students are travelling home, we must ensure they do so in a way which minimises the risks of spreading the virus, and the date when universities must stop in-person teaching will be an important part of this.

"We will set out details on this shortly."

The department gave no details on whether the measures would be for all universities in England or just those in virus hotspots.'


What do you think of these potential plans?

Is heading home for Christmas essential for you, and would you stop any in-person teaching you may be having early to be able to do so?

What do you think about potential plans to limit in-person mixing between students and the wider community before the students head home for Christmas? Do you think this is feasible, or will guidelines be difficult to adhere to?

Let us know your thoughts below!
Unless the DfE have evidence of transmission due to in person teaching then stopping in person teaching isn't going to do anything to help students reduce their risk before the holidays.
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ellefrancessa
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I do get this but what about students who still need to go to work and have other commitments and won't be able to lockdown. I would still need to go to work to ensure I can pay my rent and bills. Don't really think it would work as it is not a one size fit all approach.
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Desideri
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I’m not convinced that much of the transmission happening at unis is happening in class, so unless they can show that this is the problem, I don’t think stopping in person teaching is going to make a difference.

At least at my uni, classes involve everyone in masks, 2 metres apart, hand gel, etc. And then in the evenings some students are still meeting up indoors despite restrictions, hugging friends and even having parties.
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(Original post by Desideri)
I’m not convinced that much of the transmission happening at unis is happening in class, so unless they can show that this is the problem, I don’t think stopping in person teaching is going to make a difference.

At least at my uni, classes involve everyone in masks, 2 metres apart, hand gel, etc. And then in the evenings some students are still meeting up indoors despite restrictions, hugging friends and even having parties.
And this is precisely the problem. I think uni students should've remained at home and all teaching, except for courses like medicine, remain online. In my area, the massive rise started only once students returned. Now as a key worker, it irritates me that university students are being so reckless.
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Lilymae69
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Do you guys realise this is the gov puting out diff scenarios to see which appease the public reaction better?
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shortgirl96
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Won't really make a iota of difference.
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Mustafa0605
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Why are they going to lock down the Univeristy and the students that live away from home. They don’t consider that a large fraction of students live at home, especially in the big cities.
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Sinnoh
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So this is really aimed at people in halls of residence, right? They're not going to eliminate coronavirus among students by making hundreds of them stay in one place... this idea would make sense if their aim was actually to have the whole student population be infected.

The first half of this term for me has no in-person teaching whatsoever, then for the second half of term, I have to come in a maximum of twice a week for labs and nothing else. I don't want that brief bit of actually getting what I signed up for to be taken away like that. I live at home and commute, anyway.

And let's not forget that halls of residence aren't really meant to be stayed in for long periods without leaving. They're basically dormitories with kitchens and a few other amenities. You're not meant to spend all your time there.
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by Sinnoh)
So this is really aimed at people in halls of residence, right? They're not going to eliminate coronavirus among students by making hundreds of them stay in one place... this idea would make sense if their aim was actually to have the whole student population be infected.

The first half of this term for me has no in-person teaching whatsoever, then for the second half of term, I have to come in a maximum of twice a week for labs and nothing else. I don't want that brief bit of actually getting what I signed up for to be taken away like that. I live at home and commute, anyway.

And let's not forget that halls of residence aren't really meant to be stayed in for long periods without leaving. They're basically dormitories with kitchens and a few other amenities. You're not meant to spend all your time there.
Exactly. I don't know how they could enforce anything where students are living in student houses, or commuting from elsewhere. It was ridiculous to overlook the effect people moving into halls from all over would have, and then *shocked pikachu face* when infections start to rise. You're absolutely right as well - there's a reason halls aren't well-furnished and cosy, and usually have dodgy heating and sound-proofing.
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Ramipril
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The only people they are realistically going to be able to do anything to are the student who live in university owned accommodation.

How will the affect me? I'll just carry on my life as I have been.
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