Knightrises10
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Hi. So can anyone tell me what's the best way of studying organic chemistry? I'm in Year 13, but due to some reasons I missed Year 12 organic in school, an later we know the lockdown happened. So, I haven't still covered Year 12 organic, and we are soon going to start the Year 13 content at school.
So any tips on how should I manage that? What's the best way to do so?
Also, there are mixed ideas among different people. Some of them ask me to study from only book/chemguide/notes because it's more of a learning. While others say that books or notes are not important and I should rather watch some vidoes on YouTube as it's complete understanding. So what's the case?
TIA
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studyAngelx
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(Original post by Knightrises10)
Hi. So can anyone tell me what's the best way of studying organic chemistry? I'm in Year 13, but due to some reasons I missed Year 12 organic in school, an later we know the lockdown happened. So, I haven't still covered Year 12 organic, and we are soon going to start the Year 13 content at school.
So any tips on how should I manage that? What's the best way to do so?
Also, there are mixed ideas among different people. Some of them ask me to study from only book/chemguide/notes because it's more of a learning. While others say that books or notes are not important and I should rather watch some vidoes on YouTube as it's complete understanding. So what's the case?
TIA
The best way is to make as many connections between topics as possible, in order to deepen your understanding. And continuously actively recall mechanisms and conditions for them(if required). e.g you can spend 30 mins a week recalling every mechanism and conditions you have learnt so it sticks.


In terms of the practicals, ensure to draw them out and actually google videos of experiments if you’ve missed the opportunity to do them. So you can understand why each step is being done. If you’re a visual learner this will help.

As far as the making connections that I spoke about For example in AQA at AS, you learn about the elimination mechanism, then further on you learn about the dehydration of ethanol to form ethene. If you remember that this is also a form of elimination, even though it’s introduced separately, it helps to condense two topics into one big topic, and as long as u remember the general mechanism for elimination, you should also remember it for the dehydrating alcohols.

connections can also be between inorganic and organic. For example, when u study the test for halogeonalkanes, instead of just memorising the steps, understand why they’re done. At first, NaOH is added, which ties into nucleophilic substitution, as [R-X + OH] forms[ R-OH + X] the X represents the halogen in the halogenoalkane, and it has now been freed from the alkane, therefore u can now normally test for halogens as described in the inorganic part of chemistry.

There’s many connections in chemistry to be made that allows u to stop memorising, and start understanding more. Also, everyone’s best method of revising varies, but I say if you find u don’t understand some parts of the book, use google and YouTube to fill those gaps. You don’t have to stick to one source.

Hope this helps!
Last edited by studyAngelx; 1 month ago
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Knightrises10
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(Original post by studyAngelx)
The best way is to make as many connections between topics as possible, in order to deepen your understanding. And continuously actively recall mechanisms and conditions for them(if required). e.g you can spend 30 mins a week recalling every mechanism and conditions you have learnt so it sticks.


In terms of the practicals, ensure to draw them out and actually google videos of experiments if you’ve missed the opportunity to do them. So you can understand why each step is being done. If you’re a visual learner this will help.

As far as the making connections that I spoke about For example in AQA at AS, you learn about the elimination mechanism, then further on you learn about the dehydration of ethanol to form ethene. If you remember that this is also a form of elimination, even though it’s introduced separately, it helps to condense two topics into one big topic, and as long as u remember the general mechanism for elimination, you should also remember it for the dehydrating alcohols.

connections can also be between inorganic and organic. For example, when u study the test for halogeonalkanes, instead of just memorising the steps, understand why they’re done. At first, NaOH is added, which ties into nucleophilic substitution, as [R-X + OH] forms[ R-OH + X] the X represents the halogen in the halogenoalkane, and it has now been freed from the alkane, therefore u can now normally test for halogens as described in the inorganic part of chemistry.

There’s many connections in chemistry to be made that allows u to stop memorising, and start understanding more. Also, everyone’s best method of revising varies, but I say if you find u don’t understand some parts of the book, use google and YouTube to fill those gaps. You don’t have to stick to one source.

Hope this helps!
Thank you! That was really helpful.
Do you think it's doable right now along with everything of Year 13? I mean how would you recommend me doing this along with year 13, without neglecting either of them
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studyAngelx
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(Original post by Knightrises10)
Thank you! That was really helpful.
Do you think it's doable right now along with everything of Year 13? I mean how would you recommend me doing this along with year 13, without neglecting either of them
I think it’s very doable as long as you dedicate enough time to it.

To ensure u remember and understand as much as possible, you have to ensure to revise old topics while learning new topics. This can be done by writing yourself end of topic questions. Maybe do 2-4 end of topic questions a week. Specific questions such as “ outline the steps of how to carry out an acid-base titration” or “ draw the apparatus required for an acid-base titration”, as these are genuine details you may need in the exam

Use the specification to identify which part of the textbook content to focus on, and to ensure that your notes are relevant. Always start each topic with the spec next to you, so you can easily see what u still need to go over in each topic.

Once you finish a topic, write a series of end of topic questions to use in the future, especially for when it’s been a while since you’ve revised that topic. This will help identify the gaps in your knowledge. If you want to be even more organised u can create a table or spreadsheet and colour code it based on how much u remember after you have done your end of topic recap set of questions. You can also write the date everytime u complete a series of questions to see if it’s been a while since you last revised a topic.

When you learn a topic, you can also (verbally or on paper) blurt out everything you remember the next day or following days, then look back at your notes to see how much you remember from what you’ve just learnt.

With year 13 chemistry content, a lot of year 2 May be a continuation of year 1, so, if you’ve learnt for example both year 1 and year 2 thermodynamics, maybe make a set of questions on the whole thermodynamics chapter, so when you’re revising, you’re revising both year 1 and 2 at the same time!

Or with organic, everytime u learn a new mechanism you can add it to your list of questions that may say “ name and outline the conditions and mechanism required to convert X into Y “ so at the end u have a full set of questions on both year 1 and two mechanisms.

I guess my main point is to integrate year 1 with 2, organic and inorganic, and not see every topic as a completely different section!
Last edited by studyAngelx; 1 month ago
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