Itsonlyise
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What are the pros and cons of taking this course? And is there a way to work with just children
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mary388
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What about child nursing then?
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B.Davies 99
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i am unsure, i think with mental health nursing the youngest you can work with is around 3 ish as there isnt any specific mental health problems in children younger. i think you can go on to just work with children after you've completed the course. if you really really just want to work with children then i suggest childrens nursing but this is medical and not mental health.
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moosec
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hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
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jxnna01
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(Original post by moosec)
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
Hi. I am also interested in mental health nursing.

Can I ask a few questions? What A-Levels did you take? I am thinking of changing English Language to Psychology/Sociology to pursue this.
My other options are EPQ, Maths and Business (I know; not really relevant).
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moosec
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(Original post by jxnna01)
Hi. I am also interested in mental health nursing.

Can I ask a few questions? What A-Levels did you take? I am thinking of changing English Language to Psychology/Sociology to pursue this.
My other options are EPQ, Maths and Business (I know; not really relevant).
Of course! Ask away, anything at all!
I took A Levels in Creative Writing, Travel & Tourism and Film Studies lol... totally not relevant to mental health nursing at all. After my A Levels I went to uni and got a degree in Sound Design as well😂
At interview, they were more interested in my personal values & transferable skills than the specific subjects I’d studied ☺️
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B.Davies 99
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(Original post by moosec)
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
i have some questions, 1. What would you say is the youngest age you can work with in Mental Health nursing? 2. I live in Wales so if i was to go to Uni in England would it be similar to how English students will have it or will there be a slight change with grants and all.? 3. would you be willing to answer some questions for my WelshBacc project a about MH nursing, If you aren't qualified yet then don't worry you can pretend you are for some of the questions
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moosec
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(Original post by B.Davies 99)
i have some questions, 1. What would you say is the youngest age you can work with in Mental Health nursing? 2. I live in Wales so if i was to go to Uni in England would it be similar to how English students will have it or will there be a slight change with grants and all.? 3. would you be willing to answer some questions for my WelshBacc project a about MH nursing, If you aren't qualified yet then don't worry you can pretend you are for some of the questions
I haven’t yet had a CAMHS placement but CAMHS sees people between the ages of 0-16 (though I’m pretty sure most trusts are pushing that age bracket up to 18 rather than 16) so you can technically be working with children of any age.
I’m not too sure how the grants would work, you’d probably be best looking at the website for the NHS Learning Support Fund who provide the Training Grant in England.
Yes I’d be willing to answer any questions, drop me a message and I’ll get back to you with them! don’t think I could pretend I was qualified though, think it goes against the Nursing & Midwifery Council Code of Conduct
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B.Davies 99
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(Original post by moosec)
I haven’t yet had a CAMHS placement but CAMHS sees people between the ages of 0-16 (though I’m pretty sure most trusts are pushing that age bracket up to 18 rather than 16) so you can technically be working with children of any age.
I’m not too sure how the grants would work, you’d probably be best looking at the website for the NHS Learning Support Fund who provide the Training Grant in England.
Yes I’d be willing to answer any questions, drop me a message and I’ll get back to you with them! don’t think I could pretend I was qualified though, think it goes against the Nursing & Midwifery Council Code of Conduct
haha Yeah don't want to break The code of conduct. yes i'll give you a message now.

also with the children aged from 0, is that more so to do with Mothers who have Mental health issues related to having the baby or do you actually deal with Mental health problems with the really young children? I never knew it was possible for really young children to develop Mental health problems so young.
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moosec
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(Original post by B.Davies 99)
haha Yeah don't want to break The code of conduct. yes i'll give you a message now.

also with the children aged from 0, is that more so to do with Mothers who have Mental health issues related to having the baby or do you actually deal with Mental health problems with the really young children? I never knew it was possible for really young children to develop Mental health problems so young.
perinatal mental health is under adult services, as it's support for the parent rather than the child (unless in the case of a young parent, where I'd assume there'd be CAMHS involvement if necessary, don't quote me on that though haha.) It's probably less common to see infants in mental health services, as they don't demonstrate 'typical' symptoms of mental ill health, but its not uncommon to see children as young as 4/5 coming into CAMHS.
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B.Davies 99
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(Original post by moosec)
perinatal mental health is under adult services, as it's support for the parent rather than the child (unless in the case of a young parent, where I'd assume there'd be CAMHS involvement if necessary, don't quote me on that though haha.) It's probably less common to see infants in mental health services, as they don't demonstrate 'typical' symptoms of mental ill health, but its not uncommon to see children as young as 4/5 coming into CAMHS.
That sounds intresting!
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