About nursing (mental health)

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Itsonlyise
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#1
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#1
What are the pros and cons of taking this course? And is there a way to work with just children
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mary388
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#2
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#2
What about child nursing then?
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moosec
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#3
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#3
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
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jxnna01
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#4
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#4
(Original post by moosec)
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
Hi. I am also interested in mental health nursing.

Can I ask a few questions? What A-Levels did you take? I am thinking of changing English Language to Psychology/Sociology to pursue this.
My other options are EPQ, Maths and Business (I know; not really relevant).
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moosec
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#5
Report 1 year ago
#5
(Original post by jxnna01)
Hi. I am also interested in mental health nursing.

Can I ask a few questions? What A-Levels did you take? I am thinking of changing English Language to Psychology/Sociology to pursue this.
My other options are EPQ, Maths and Business (I know; not really relevant).
Of course! Ask away, anything at all!
I took A Levels in Creative Writing, Travel & Tourism and Film Studies lol... totally not relevant to mental health nursing at all. After my A Levels I went to uni and got a degree in Sound Design as well😂
At interview, they were more interested in my personal values & transferable skills than the specific subjects I’d studied ☺️
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B.Davies 99
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#6
Report 1 year ago
#6
(Original post by moosec)
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
i have some questions, 1. What would you say is the youngest age you can work with in Mental Health nursing? 2. I live in Wales so if i was to go to Uni in England would it be similar to how English students will have it or will there be a slight change with grants and all.? 3. would you be willing to answer some questions for my WelshBacc project a about MH nursing, If you aren't qualified yet then don't worry you can pretend you are for some of the questions
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moosec
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#7
Report 1 year ago
#7
(Original post by B.Davies 99)
i have some questions, 1. What would you say is the youngest age you can work with in Mental Health nursing? 2. I live in Wales so if i was to go to Uni in England would it be similar to how English students will have it or will there be a slight change with grants and all.? 3. would you be willing to answer some questions for my WelshBacc project a about MH nursing, If you aren't qualified yet then don't worry you can pretend you are for some of the questions
I haven’t yet had a CAMHS placement but CAMHS sees people between the ages of 0-16 (though I’m pretty sure most trusts are pushing that age bracket up to 18 rather than 16) so you can technically be working with children of any age.
I’m not too sure how the grants would work, you’d probably be best looking at the website for the NHS Learning Support Fund who provide the Training Grant in England.
Yes I’d be willing to answer any questions, drop me a message and I’ll get back to you with them! don’t think I could pretend I was qualified though, think it goes against the Nursing & Midwifery Council Code of Conduct
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B.Davies 99
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#8
Report 1 year ago
#8
(Original post by moosec)
I haven’t yet had a CAMHS placement but CAMHS sees people between the ages of 0-16 (though I’m pretty sure most trusts are pushing that age bracket up to 18 rather than 16) so you can technically be working with children of any age.
I’m not too sure how the grants would work, you’d probably be best looking at the website for the NHS Learning Support Fund who provide the Training Grant in England.
Yes I’d be willing to answer any questions, drop me a message and I’ll get back to you with them! don’t think I could pretend I was qualified though, think it goes against the Nursing & Midwifery Council Code of Conduct
haha Yeah don't want to break The code of conduct. yes i'll give you a message now.

also with the children aged from 0, is that more so to do with Mothers who have Mental health issues related to having the baby or do you actually deal with Mental health problems with the really young children? I never knew it was possible for really young children to develop Mental health problems so young.
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moosec
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#9
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#9
(Original post by B.Davies 99)
haha Yeah don't want to break The code of conduct. yes i'll give you a message now.

also with the children aged from 0, is that more so to do with Mothers who have Mental health issues related to having the baby or do you actually deal with Mental health problems with the really young children? I never knew it was possible for really young children to develop Mental health problems so young.
perinatal mental health is under adult services, as it's support for the parent rather than the child (unless in the case of a young parent, where I'd assume there'd be CAMHS involvement if necessary, don't quote me on that though haha.) It's probably less common to see infants in mental health services, as they don't demonstrate 'typical' symptoms of mental ill health, but its not uncommon to see children as young as 4/5 coming into CAMHS.
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B.Davies 99
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#10
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#10
(Original post by moosec)
perinatal mental health is under adult services, as it's support for the parent rather than the child (unless in the case of a young parent, where I'd assume there'd be CAMHS involvement if necessary, don't quote me on that though haha.) It's probably less common to see infants in mental health services, as they don't demonstrate 'typical' symptoms of mental ill health, but its not uncommon to see children as young as 4/5 coming into CAMHS.
That sounds intresting!
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__evienne__
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#11
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#11
(Original post by moosec)
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
(Original post by moosec)
hi, im a student mental health nurse
pros: exciting, every day is different, rewarding, plentiful job opportunities (shortage of MH Nurses atm), really varied job prospects upon graduation (lots of clinical areas in mental health which you can go into), extra grant for studying Mental Health Nursing (all nursing courses in England get a £5000 a year non-repayable grant, but since MH is a specialist subject & mental health nurses are in such high demand, you'll get an extra £1000 a year just for studying mental health nursing), patient contact (in its very essence, you're building very personal therapeutic relationships with patients which is a great privilege.), nursing is like one big family so you will probably find you'll form a close rapport with your colleagues on the course, tutors, mentors, and other student nurses from elsewhere too!
cons: it's a very intense degree (as with all nursing & healthcare fields), you can see/hear very upsetting things (but you'll be well-supported by your placement area, uni and friends on the course), you get less holiday & free time than students on other degrees (usually two weeks for xmas, two weeks for easter then a few weeks for summer).

Upon qualifying, yes you have your choice of what area you want to go into, it's just a case of locating & applying for a job in that area! So if you want to work in children's mental health, you can pursue CAMHS as a career. But on the course, no... there's not much chance of you just working with children. The beauty of MH Nursing is that we cover all ages, so you'll get placement opportunities across the entirety of the lifespan from children & adolescents to older adults.
If you want to work with children, maybe consider children's nursing. But you need to weigh up (if your interests lie in mental health, specifically MH of children) whether you'd be interested in/happy to undertake placements in children's medicine - this could be children's surgical wards, children's cancer care, children's hospice care, neonatal care etc. For instance, personally I want to work with children after qualifying in Community CAMHS, but chose MH field over children's field because I would find it too upsetting to be on a medical ward for children. Its an entirely personal choice
Hi, I’m currently in year 12 and I have yet to choose which degree i want to pursue. One of my keen interests is mental health. Due to my GCSE results last year, I wasn’t able to take any science subjects or psychology for a-levels but I did take sociology. My current aspiration right now is to become a CBT therapist however becoming a mental health nurse is a close second. Would a mental health nursing degree allow me to study to become a therapist or should I pursue psychology degree? Another concern that my mum worries about is the safety aspect of the job, I am curious on how well were taught on it, how to deal with situations, to what extent is it scary, any potential harms that could happen to me? As a result of her worries, she leading me onto a path of social work instead where I could pursue CBT later on with this degree but I’d like to keep the door open for mental health nursing. Will a social work degree help me get into mental health nursing.
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millsr
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#12
Report 9 months ago
#12
(Original post by __evienne__)
Hi, I’m currently in year 12 and I have yet to choose which degree i want to pursue. One of my keen interests is mental health. Due to my GCSE results last year, I wasn’t able to take any science subjects or psychology for a-levels but I did take sociology. My current aspiration right now is to become a CBT therapist however becoming a mental health nurse is a close second. Would a mental health nursing degree allow me to study to become a therapist or should I pursue psychology degree? Another concern that my mum worries about is the safety aspect of the job, I am curious on how well were taught on it, how to deal with situations, to what extent is it scary, any potential harms that could happen to me? As a result of her worries, she leading me onto a path of social work instead where I could pursue CBT later on with this degree but I’d like to keep the door open for mental health nursing. Will a social work degree help me get into mental health nursing.
From the NHS Health Careers Website's page on CBT Therapists (https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...bt-therapist):

"The cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) training is open to people with a range of experience. You will normally need to have a degree to undertake the postgraduate diploma but you may also be able to access the training if you can demonstrate equivalent academic skills.
You will also need to have a core mental health profession or be able to demonstrate equivalence to core mental health professional training. Visit the BABCP website to find out more about the core profession or equivalent knowledge, skills and attitudes.
The course is aimed at mental health professionals (or those with the equivalent knowledge, skills and attitudes) who have had some experience in a mental health environment. Applicants should demonstrate evidence of interpersonal skills and an openness to learning new knowledge and skills."

It might therefore be better to do a mental health nursing degree then a CBT training course, but you'll need to be passionate enough about working in mental health in order to get through a mental health nursing course as they're not easy. MH nursing will open up more doors for you if you later decide that CBT isn't for you, and there are lots of areas of mental health that you could work in if you want to.

As for safety, a friend of mine is a student mental health nurse and she recently had a placement in a psychiatric intensive care unit, and was telling me that while you do get some violence from patients, staff are trained in how to safely restrain people, and you're not allowed to help with restraints as a student until you've gone through the correct training. As with any healthcare job, it of course has its dangers, but there are measures in place to keep you safe and you'll never be put into a dangerous situation without the right training and support to cope with it.

I don't really recommend pursuing a social work degree given your career aspirations, as it won't allow you to be a mental health nurse and it may make it slightly harder to get accepted onto a CBT training course if you choose to go down that route. It's also quite different from nursing and CBT work, so I'd either do mental health nursing or psychology as a degree if I were you. (Don't worry about not taking A level Psychology either, you don't need it to be accepted onto the degree course).
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__evienne__
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#13
Report 8 months ago
#13
(Original post by millsr)
From the NHS Health Careers Website's page on CBT Therapists (https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...bt-therapist):

"The cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) training is open to people with a range of experience. You will normally need to have a degree to undertake the postgraduate diploma but you may also be able to access the training if you can demonstrate equivalent academic skills.
You will also need to have a core mental health profession or be able to demonstrate equivalence to core mental health professional training. Visit the BABCP website to find out more about the core profession or equivalent knowledge, skills and attitudes.
The course is aimed at mental health professionals (or those with the equivalent knowledge, skills and attitudes) who have had some experience in a mental health environment. Applicants should demonstrate evidence of interpersonal skills and an openness to learning new knowledge and skills."

It might therefore be better to do a mental health nursing degree then a CBT training course, but you'll need to be passionate enough about working in mental health in order to get through a mental health nursing course as they're not easy. MH nursing will open up more doors for you if you later decide that CBT isn't for you, and there are lots of areas of mental health that you could work in if you want to.

As for safety, a friend of mine is a student mental health nurse and she recently had a placement in a psychiatric intensive care unit, and was telling me that while you do get some violence from patients, staff are trained in how to safely restrain people, and you're not allowed to help with restraints as a student until you've gone through the correct training. As with any healthcare job, it of course has its dangers, but there are measures in place to keep you safe and you'll never be put into a dangerous situation without the right training and support to cope with it.

I don't really recommend pursuing a social work degree given your career aspirations, as it won't allow you to be a mental health nurse and it may make it slightly harder to get accepted onto a CBT training course if you choose to go down that route. It's also quite different from nursing and CBT work, so I'd either do mental health nursing or psychology as a degree if I were you. (Don't worry about not taking A level Psychology either, you don't need it to be accepted onto the degree course).
Thank You, this was so helpful!

I have considered it and I have actually decided to look into either a social science degree or a sociology with psychology degree. I think this decision was very much a comprise between my mum still wanting me to go onto to do social work while I also still have the option to either study a postgrad in mental health nursing or CBT. I’m very much pleased with this course so far.

I have started my research on the sort of unis which do these subjects. I have a keen interest in University of York however I am unsure of the course they are offering. York offers Sociology with a Social Psychology degree. How is social psychology different to Psychology and will it limit me when doing a post grad in those areas?

Thank You Again !
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millsr
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#14
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#14
(Original post by __evienne__)
Thank You, this was so helpful!

I have considered it and I have actually decided to look into either a social science degree or a sociology with psychology degree. I think this decision was very much a comprise between my mum still wanting me to go onto to do social work while I also still have the option to either study a postgrad in mental health nursing or CBT. I’m very much pleased with this course so far.

I have started my research on the sort of unis which do these subjects. I have a keen interest in University of York however I am unsure of the course they are offering. York offers Sociology with a Social Psychology degree. How is social psychology different to Psychology and will it limit me when doing a post grad in those areas?

Thank You Again !
I'm by no means an expert (studied A level psychology and GCSE sociology but that's it), but having had a look at the course page on York's website, it seems social psychology will likely look at psychological concepts and ideas but apply them in a social context only. If you are interested in studying psychology in depth, I wouldn't recommend taking it, but if you're more interested in the social side then it might be a good choice. Just be aware that you'll probably only study a small amount of psychology and likely won't be studying things like mental health conditions and biopsychology in any detail, if at all.

A couple of other things worth noting - a degree that is named '[Subject] with [Subject]' is not the same as one named '[Subject] and [Subject]'. The difference is the percentage of the course spent focusing on each subject. A degree that has 'and' in the title will be a 50/50 split between the subjects, but a degree that has 'with' in the title will be in the region of 80/20. In this case, you'll only spend about 20% of the course looking at psychology, and that will then be further limited to social psychology. Because of this, the course is not BPS accredited (that's not a problem unless you want to do a BPS accredited course), and you may be quite limited if you want to do something psychology-related once you've graduated. It won't be an issue for mental health nursing, and might not be a problem for CBT training, but if you're applying for psychology-related courses you might be at a disadvantage to those who have done a degree in just psychology.

As I said, if you're not particularly fussed about studying a lot of psychology, or are only interested in the social side of it, the York course could be a good option (try and go to an open day and ask the course lecturers for more detail about the course content). If you think you would like to look at a broader range of topics in psychology but are still mostly interested in sociology, look into Sociology with Psychology degrees, but if you think you are interested in both and would like to study both subjects in similar depth, look at Sociology and Psychology degrees. If you want BPS accreditation I think you'll have to do a Sociology and Psychology degree.
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__evienne__
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#15
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#15
(Original post by millsr)
I'm by no means an expert (studied A level psychology and GCSE sociology but that's it), but having had a look at the course page on York's website, it seems social psychology will likely look at psychological concepts and ideas but apply them in a social context only. If you are interested in studying psychology in depth, I wouldn't recommend taking it, but if you're more interested in the social side then it might be a good choice. Just be aware that you'll probably only study a small amount of psychology and likely won't be studying things like mental health conditions and biopsychology in any detail, if at all.

A couple of other things worth noting - a degree that is named '[Subject] with [Subject]' is not the same as one named '[Subject] and [Subject]'. The difference is the percentage of the course spent focusing on each subject. A degree that has 'and' in the title will be a 50/50 split between the subjects, but a degree that has 'with' in the title will be in the region of 80/20. In this case, you'll only spend about 20% of the course looking at psychology, and that will then be further limited to social psychology. Because of this, the course is not BPS accredited (that's not a problem unless you want to do a BPS accredited course), and you may be quite limited if you want to do something psychology-related once you've graduated. It won't be an issue for mental health nursing, and might not be a problem for CBT training, but if you're applying for psychology-related courses you might be at a disadvantage to those who have done a degree in just psychology.

As I said, if you're not particularly fussed about studying a lot of psychology, or are only interested in the social side of it, the York course could be a good option (try and go to an open day and ask the course lecturers for more detail about the course content). If you think you would like to look at a broader range of topics in psychology but are still mostly interested in sociology, look into Sociology with Psychology degrees, but if you think you are interested in both and would like to study both subjects in similar depth, look at Sociology and Psychology degrees. If you want BPS accreditation I think you'll have to do a Sociology and Psychology degree.
Ok, thank you I will take this under consideration! You have been very helpful. I feel as though I will look into a sociology and psychology degree. Thanks !
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