To start a Business, what do I do? Where to go? What to even say?

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Sha.xo527
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I'm studying business at my secondary school, but they never taught me the mere basics. I'm just curious and I'd like to know more as to what to do. Sorry for all the questions:

Let's say I want to create a brand:
What are the first steps of creating a brand?
Do I call/tell anyone specifically to say ''I want a business''. Do I even say that?
Where do I go? By this I don't mean which city would give me the most opportunities, I mean is there any random building people go to to say ''I want a business''?
What If i want my own building? (Same questions)?
Once you start your brand/business, then what?

I know to start a business you also need people. How do you even collect these people??? Who are they paid by? Me? What if I'm just starting and have no money? Are they strangers?

I am so confused... I wish school taught me these kinds of things. I need people to tell me exactly what to do step by step, not make me spend 3 lessons on market research without even telling me how to start something first.
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MindMax2000
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Note: do not take any of the following as business advice. Always seek advice from a professional and experienced business advisors.

I recommend getting a job working under a businessperson to get the experience, or at least get advice from a business mentor. If you intend to start your own, then you might want to speak to a business advisor regarding setting up a business, as there are many places that offer start-up advice (google them for your local area).

I think UK law mandates that you need to be at least 18 to start your business, although it is said you can still start a business should you have someone who is at least 18 to sign off the decisions - see a solicitor regarding this first. It will probably be a good idea to do your A Levels or a Level 3 qualification before doing so, as it's difficult to do after you're 19.

The process can seem a bit murky because every business is different, and it's very difficult to gauge demand without going through it all beforehand.

When people start a business from scratch, it's usually just the founder (and his team maybe). The employees come on board later in the game, usually. Having said that, you can buy an existing business with everything figured out as well.
To hire people, you usually put up job posts on a website like Indeed. However, there are other ways such as networking, recieving speculative CVs, word of mouth, etc. The owner/director usually signs off payroll for employees, unless it's a big company where pay is managed by HR/payroll department. If you're hiring contractors/freelancers, you pay them after the job is done (and ideally you have signed a contract with them as well).
If you're starting with no money, you can either save up and start with what you have or seek funding. This can be via loans, share offerings, etc. - it comes under business finance. Having said that, most online business don't require a lot of money to start. There are ways to start a business with little to no money, but I wouldn't advise on it.

People will have different definitions of what a brand is (you can google the definition from a specialised business dictionary if you want). For me, it's the reputation of the company. The moment you interact with the public is when you start building your brand. There is no formal step by step training on this, as far as I know. A brand just comes into being once the reputation is widespread enough.

Wanting your own building is a good aspiration, but it' a bit of a stretch when you're starting out and have no business experience. A lot of businesses prefer to work remotely/at home because it cuts down on costs and there isn't really a need to have a building considering what technology we have. Unless you're running a factory or deal with a lot of paperwork where you need to be at a certain place to manage it all, I wouldn't even get an office (one can cost £400 -£1000 in rent per month not including business taxes, so imagine the cost of a building that houses 20 or so offices).

People start a business for various reasons. This can be from something as grand as changing the world, to something as small as earning a bit more money to supplement. Once you have established a business, it will depend on whether you want to continue meeting those business objectives/goals or change and do something else. If you're the CEO/director/owner, you're in the driving seat, but you're also liable to meet certain responsibilities (and there will be a lot of them).

Should you wish to go on business courses, I'd say there are 3 main types out there:

  1. Academia - this is college and uni, where you will most learn about business theory and a bit of skill - essentially what you're doing at GCSE but more in depth. This can be a Level 3 qualification, Bachelor's in a business related subject, MBA, other master's in business related subjects, or even research doctoral degrees. There are occasional online/short/free courses on business held by universities, research institutions, and colleges
  2. Professional courses - there aren't courses that I know of that are specialised for entrepreneurs or business owners from a professional body, but you can take some and earn qualifications from professional bodies in accounting, HR, and marketing to get the fundamental knowledge you need to be a good manager/businessperson. The information in these qualifications/courses tend to have a bit of theory, but a lot of practical stuff.
  3. Courses by other people - this can be from people who just know a lot about business, people who have succeeded in business, or people just selling courses. The quality can vary wildly from complete misinformation and waste of money to the best material out there. You have to be very careful about learning this, as none of this is accredited by academia or professional bodies. However, the material you can get can be regarding business principles that can be applied to most businesses; most should be practical material, although there are a number that have business theory in them.

Having said that, there is no legal requirement that I know of that you need a certain qualification to start a business, but it pays to know something about business before starting. However, whatever course or material you learn, you need to be wary of whether it complies with UK laws.

In my opinion, the biggest headaches when starting a business are legal and accounting. On the business economics side of things, you will be concerned by efficiency, IT, marketing, and financial management.

For general advice when you are starting a business, I would recommend looking into the Federation of Small Business in the UK (there's a separate US organisation with the same name I think), where you can get a lot of advice and support to start a business for an annual subscription. However, I would recommend speaking to the business advisor for free sessions first when you come to this.

Like I said, the process of starting a business can be murky, but the above is my take on it.
Last edited by MindMax2000; 9 months ago
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Sha.xo527
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Note: do not take any of the following as business advice. Always seek advice from a professional and experienced business advisors.

I recommend getting a job working under a businessperson to get the experience, or at least get advice from a business mentor. If you intend to start your own, then you might want to speak to a business advisor regarding setting up a business, as there are many places that offer start-up advice (google them for your local area).

I think UK law mandates that you need to be at least 18 to start your business, although it is said you can still start a business should you have someone who is at least 18 to sign off the decisions - see a solicitor regarding this first. It will probably be a good idea to do your A Levels or a Level 3 qualification before doing so, as it's difficult to do after you're 19.

The process can seem a bit murky because every business is different, and it's very difficult to gauge demand without going through it all beforehand.

When people start a business from scratch, it's usually just the founder (and his team maybe). The employees come on board later in the game, usually. Having said that, you can buy an existing business with everything figured out as well.
To hire people, you usually put up job posts on a website like Indeed. However, there are other ways such as networking, recieving speculative CVs, word of mouth, etc. The owner/director usually signs off payroll for employees, unless it's a big company where pay is managed by HR/payroll department. If you're hiring contractors/freelancers, you pay them after the job is done (and ideally you have signed a contract with them as well).
If you're starting with no money, you can either save up and start with what you have or seek funding. This can be via loans, share offerings, etc. - it comes under business finance. Having said that, most online business don't require a lot of money to start. There are ways to start a business with little to no money, but I wouldn't advise on it.

People will have different definitions of what a brand is (you can google the definition from a specialised business dictionary if you want). For me, it's the reputation of the company. The moment you interact with the public is when you start building your brand. There is no formal step by step training on this, as far as I know. A brand just comes into being once the reputation is widespread enough.

Wanting your own building is a good aspiration, but it' a bit of a stretch when you're starting out and have no business experience. A lot of businesses prefer to work remotely/at home because it cuts down on costs and there isn't really a need to have a building considering what technology we have. Unless you're running a factory or deal with a lot of paperwork where you need to be at a certain place to manage it all, I wouldn't even get an office (one can cost £400 -£1000 in rent per month not including business taxes, so imagine the cost of a building that houses 20 or so offices).

People start a business for various reasons. This can be from something as grand as changing the world, to something as small as earning a bit more money to supplement. Once you have established a business, it will depend on whether you want to continue meeting those business objectives/goals or change and do something else. If you're the CEO/director/owner, you're in the driving seat, but you're also liable to meet certain responsibilities (and there will be a lot of them).

Should you wish to go on business courses, I'd say there are 3 main types out there:

  1. Academia - this is college and uni, where you will most learn about business theory and a bit of skill - essentially what you're doing at GCSE but more in depth. This can be a Level 3 qualification, Bachelor's in a business related subject, MBA, other master's in business related subjects, or even research doctoral degrees. There are occasional online/short/free courses on business held by universities, research institutions, and colleges
  2. Professional courses - there aren't courses that I know of that are specialised for entrepreneurs or business owners from a professional body, but you can take some and earn qualifications from professional bodies in accounting, HR, and marketing to get the fundamental knowledge you need to be a good manager/businessperson. The information in these qualifications/courses tend to have a bit of theory, but a lot of practical stuff.
  3. Courses by other people - this can be from people who just know a lot about business, people who have succeeded in business, or people just selling courses. The quality can vary wildly from complete misinformation and waste of money to the best material out there. You have to be very careful about learning this, as none of this is accredited by academia or professional bodies. However, the material you can get can be regarding business principles that can be applied to most businesses; most should be practical material, although there are a number that have business theory in them.

Having said that, there is no legal requirement that I know of that you need a certain qualification to start a business, but it pays to know something about business before starting. However, whatever course or material you learn, you need to be wary of whether it complies with UK laws.

In my opinion, the biggest headaches in my opinion when starting a business is the legal and accounting. On the business economics side of things, you will be concerned by efficiency, IT, marketing, and financial management.

For general advice when you are starting a business, I would recommend looking into the Federation of Small Business in the UK (there's a separate US organisation with the same name I think), where you can get a lot of advice and support to start a business for an annual subscription. However, I would recommend speaking to the business advisor for free sessions first when you come to this.

Like I said, the process of starting a business can be murky, but the above is my take on it.
That is so much more than I expected- thank you so much! You are an angel in human form. Not just that but the way you elucidated all your points was really easily comprehensible! You are better than my own teacher. I want a career in the healthcare industry, particularly dentistry- but I wanted extra knowledge about business because business is everywhere, it was my back up plan too. Again, all the information you shared is greatly appreciated. Thank you, angel trapped in human form!
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Arden University
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Hi Sha.xo527,

We ran a webinar last week with an entrepreneur called Alex Salmon who spoke about setting up his own businesses; he even set one up this year, during the pandemic! I think you may find it an interesting watch:
https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rec...12488532352001

An introduction to Alex Salmon: Alex Salmon understands business. He is a serial business entrepreneur. He has started and sold many successful businesses within and outside of the UK. He is of a mixed heritage: Jamaican father & English mother and grew up in East London and in Florida, United States of America. He is an international business tycoon and was the number 1 Sales Executive for the state of Florida In the United States for one of the largest direct sales companies in the world for three years running. He opened his own Franchise in East London which became number 1 in the UK and number 3 worldwide with over £35 million pounds annual turnover and is often headhunted by major American brands for his endorsement for the UK market. Alex develops and sells multi million pounds businesses regularly and trains business owners around the globe and mentors them into business success. Salmon is the territory Director for a number of businesses in the UK and has just started another new business within this uncertain and chaotic pandemic environment.

Amy
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