Nursing Degrees - Difference between BNurs and BSc (Hons)

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Sim1126
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Hi there, i hope someone could explain to me the difference between taking a BNurs degree in nursing and BSc hons. I know BNurs is 4 years longer, but do both lead to becoming a nurse straight away or is one just more beneficial. I am going to apply for a nursing degree and honestly cannot find a proper answer to which one to take. Are they really different from each other or just similar but different names and extra experience. Also, I've seen some 'bigger' universities such as Birmingham having BNurs but 'smaller' ones like Derby having BSc Hons which i don't get why. Some say it's just different names but quite similar.

Thank you.
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Sim1126)
I know BNurs is 4 years longer
No, it isn't. That would make a BNurs 7 years. It categorically is not. I did a BNurs at Chester and it was - and still is - THREE and is that pretty much every place.

(Original post by Sim1126)
but do both lead to becoming a nurse straight away or is one just more beneficial.
You can only be a nurse by being registered with the NMC. As long as the course is accredited by the NMC, essentially yes it does because it leads to registration - and that counts to both BSc(hons) and BN(hons) nursing courses.
Neither is more beneficial - as long as you've passed your degree, and made a decent application/interviewed well for a job, you'll be fine. There's a shortage of nurses anyway.

(Original post by Sim1126)
Are they really different from each other or just similar but different names and extra experience
They're both nursing degrees, just under different names. Neither gives extra experience, during both you do 2300 hours theory and 2300 hours practice.
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Sim1126
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I was so confused on this and my mistake I must have mistakenly looked at something else thinking that BNurs was 4 years it actually says 3. Thank you so much. 😊✨
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Sim1126
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(Original post by Emily_B)
No, it isn't. That would make a BNurs 7 years. It categorically is not. I did a BNurs at Chester and it was - and still is - THREE and is that pretty much every place.


You can only be a nurse by being registered with the NMC. As long as the course is accredited by the NMC, essentially yes it does because it leads to registration - and that counts to both BSc(hons) and BN(hons) nursing courses.
Neither is more beneficial - as long as you've passed your degree, and made a decent application/interviewed well for a job, you'll be fine. There's a shortage of nurses anyway.


They're both nursing degrees, just under different names. Neither gives extra experience, during both you do 2300 hours theory and 2300 hours practice.
Sorry to annoy you again but I was wondering if you knew the difference between MNurs and BNurs/BSc (Hons) - this one I know is one that’s 4 years. I want to be a nurse would it be more beneficial to do MNurs or BSc (Hons).
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Sim1126)
Sorry to annoy you again but I was wondering if you knew the difference between MNurs and BNurs/BSc (Hons) - this one I know is one that’s 4 years. I want to be a nurse would it be more beneficial to do MNurs or BSc (Hons).
MNurs will be a masters programme.

Bachelors vs masters, I'm of the opinion at the moment that as a newly qualified nurse, a masters doesn't really offer that much benefit over a bachelors degree. When looking for NQ nurses, employers mainly want someone who has finished the course and got registration, that is interested in the clinical area they are recruiting for and comes across in the interview like they will be able to do the role with the usual amount of support they provide to NQ staff nurses. Grades and level of qualification don't really come into play.

My pre-reg qualification was a DipHE and it hasn't held me back in my career, I've since got a degree and have studied modules at masters level which have taken my career in the direction I wanted it to. The courses I have undertaken are specific to my clinical speciality which have made me more employable.

Ultimately, if you want to do a masters and challenge yourself academically, then go for it. There will, however, be opportunities for you to undertake further study after qualifying if you do a bachelors degree, they will be specific to your clinical speciality rather than being a generic masters and your employer may even pay for it too.
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Sim1126
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(Original post by moonkatt)
MNurs will be a masters programme.

Bachelors vs masters, I'm of the opinion at the moment that as a newly qualified nurse, a masters doesn't really offer that much benefit over a bachelors degree. When looking for NQ nurses, employers mainly want someone who has finished the course and got registration, that is interested in the clinical area they are recruiting for and comes across in the interview like they will be able to do the role with the usual amount of support they provide to NQ staff nurses. Grades and level of qualification don't really come into play.

My pre-reg qualification was a DipHE and it hasn't held me back in my career, I've since got a degree and have studied modules at masters level which have taken my career in the direction I wanted it to. The courses I have undertaken are specific to my clinical speciality which have made me more employable.

Ultimately, if you want to do a masters and challenge yourself academically, then go for it. There will, however, be opportunities for you to undertake further study after qualifying if you do a bachelors degree, they will be specific to your clinical speciality rather than being a generic masters and your employer may even pay for it too.
Thank you so much. I'm just near sending my UCAS applications of and i saw the Masters degree as well so it's confusing and i should have searched up earlier. Now i get all this and hopefully it goes well. Thank you very much again for getting rid of my confusion.
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Sim1126)
Sorry to annoy you again but I was wondering if you knew the difference between MNurs and BNurs/BSc (Hons) - this one I know is one that’s 4 years. I want to be a nurse would it be more beneficial to do MNurs or BSc (Hons).
Be careful with MNurs courses. Some of these are dual registration (ie adult & mental health), others are 1 year pre registration postgraduate.
The ONLY reason I'd recommend doing an MNurs is if you do the dual registration route, and I'm sure there's a massive list of pros & cons to that one.
moonkatt has explained the benefits (or lack of ) of doing a higher qualification well. You're going to end up at the bottom of band 5 whatever you do, therefore I'd highly recommend doing a BSc/BN and then doing masters level later if you specialise in an area.
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Sim1126
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(Original post by Emily_B)
Be careful with MNurs courses. Some of these are dual registration (ie adult & mental health), others are 1 year pre registration postgraduate.
The ONLY reason I'd recommend doing an MNurs is if you do the dual registration route, and I'm sure there's a massive list of pros & cons to that one.
moonkatt has explained the benefits (or lack of ) of doing a higher qualification well. You're going to end up at the bottom of band 5 whatever you do, therefore I'd highly recommend doing a BSc/BN and then doing masters level later if you specialise in an area.
Thank you for the advice. At moment I’m thinking of applying for BSc (Hons) hopefully as I know more about this than other ones.
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sophie.beatyy
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(Original post by Emily_B)
Be careful with MNurs courses. Some of these are dual registration (ie adult & mental health), others are 1 year pre registration postgraduate.
The ONLY reason I'd recommend doing an MNurs is if you do the dual registration route, and I'm sure there's a massive list of pros & cons to that one.
moonkatt has explained the benefits (or lack of ) of doing a higher qualification well. You're going to end up at the bottom of band 5 whatever you do, therefore I'd highly recommend doing a BSc/BN and then doing masters level later if you specialise in an area.
I don’t suppose you know anything about the dual award? I’m really interested in doing adult and child nursing just to challenge myself
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Emily_B
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(Original post by sophie.beatyy)
I don’t suppose you know anything about the dual award? I’m really interested in doing adult and child nursing just to challenge myself
The degree exists. That's the extent of my knowledge on it and I'd suggest you talk to any universities which offer it (I've just googled adult and child dual registration nursing and 5 places offering that course came up).
What I definitely know is this: as a nurse or midwife, you have to revalidate every 3 years. This involves working 450 hours over the 3 years, however, if you're dual registered then you have to work 450 hours for each field (so 450 adult and 450 child) - info here https://www.nmc.org.uk/globalassets/...s-guidance.pdf . Working full time, you do a total of 1800+ hours a year, and your first 6-12 months qualified are preceptorship (like a probation period). The thing to work out is if you can find somewhere to work in both fields - a general hospital A&E is about the only place I could think of where you could do both. It's definitely a challenge to talk to the universities about - it's a lot more common to land in work where you only practice in one field and I'm sure the universities offering dual field courses are used to guiding students into dual field roles.
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InArduisFouette
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(Original post by moonkatt)
MNurs will be a masters programme.

Bachelors vs masters, I'm of the opinion at the moment that as a newly qualified nurse, a masters doesn't really offer that much benefit over a bachelors degree. When looking for NQ nurses, employers mainly want someone who has finished the course and got registration, that is interested in the clinical area they are recruiting for and comes across in the interview like they will be able to do the role with the usual amount of support they provide to NQ staff nurses. Grades and level of qualification don't really come into play.

My pre-reg qualification was a DipHE and it hasn't held me back in my career, I've since got a degree and have studied modules at masters level which have taken my career in the direction I wanted it to. The courses I have undertaken are specific to my clinical speciality which have made me more employable.

Ultimately, if you want to do a masters and challenge yourself academically, then go for it. There will, however, be opportunities for you to undertake further study after qualifying if you do a bachelors degree, they will be specific to your clinical speciality rather than being a generic masters and your employer may even pay for it too.
PRSOM
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SmilePeace
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Hi there, could anyone also explain the difference between taking a BNurs (hons) degree in nursing and BNurs degree (i.e. without hons)?

Are they really different from each other or just similar but different names and extra experience. Are some 'bigger' universities having BNurs (hons) but 'smaller' having BNurs (i.e. without hons)? If yes, it means the resources are better.

Is it difficult to get a nursing job if I only have a BNurs degree (i.e. without hons)?

Thank you
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moonkatt
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(Original post by SmilePeace)
Hi there, could anyone also explain the difference between taking a BNurs (hons) degree in nursing and BNurs degree (i.e. without hons)?

Are they really different from each other or just similar but different names and extra experience. Are some 'bigger' universities having BNurs (hons) but 'smaller' having BNurs (i.e. without hons)? If yes, it means the resources are better.

Is it difficult to get a nursing job if I only have a BNurs degree (i.e. without hons)?

Thank you
Provided the award comes with NMC registration it doesn't really matter when it comes to getting a job. There's around 40,000 nursing vacancies in the UK so it's not that challenging for an NQ nurse to find a role.

An honours degree needs more academic credits and usually has a dissertation at the end of it. Most current pre-reg courses in England and Wales are honours degrees though.
Last edited by moonkatt; 3 weeks ago
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Emily_B
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(Original post by SmilePeace)
Hi there, could anyone also explain the difference between taking a BNurs (hons) degree in nursing and BNurs degree (i.e. without hons)?

Are they really different from each other or just similar but different names and extra experience. Are some 'bigger' universities having BNurs (hons) but 'smaller' having BNurs (i.e. without hons)? If yes, it means the resources are better.

Is it difficult to get a nursing job if I only have a BNurs degree (i.e. without hons)?

Thank you
Without honours is only available in Scotland, where it's 3 years rather than the usual Scottish 4 and you have to do the 4th year + dissertation to get the honours bit.

Jobs wise? It makes no difference.
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SmilePeace
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(Original post by moonkatt)
Provided the award comes with NMC registration it doesn't really matter when it comes to getting a job. There's around 40,000 nursing vacancies in the UK so it's not that challenging for an NQ nurse to find a role.

An honours degree needs more academic credits and usually has a dissertation at the end of it. Most current pre-reg courses in England and Wales are honours degrees though.
moonkatt,

Got it. Thank you very much for the explanation.
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SmilePeace
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(Original post by Emily_B)
Without honours is only available in Scotland, where it's 3 years rather than the usual Scottish 4 and you have to do the 4th year + dissertation to get the honours bit.

Jobs wise? It makes no difference.
Emily_B

ICIC. Thanks a lot for the information.
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