This message is for anyone who wants to study Maths at UCL...

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Anonymous #1
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Any A-Level/Gap-year students who is wishing to study Mathematics at UCL. I want to send a word of warning to y'all. I've got a message for you guys as a current Mathematics student at UCL.
Just know that if you do end up getting a place at UCL at Maths, it's going to be HELL! I can't vouch for other universities but just know that Mathematics at UCL is nothing like how it is taught at school. Some lecturers here do not teach the modules at all and expect you to complete quizzes/coursework's/assignments every week with such challenging questions that they never taught you how to do. One module (Applied Maths) in first year is taught so badly, that only people who did A-Level Physics/Mechanics are able to understand and do the questions. The requirements are that you only need Maths and Further Maths but honestly, people who don't do A-Level Physics are also at a real disadvantage on this course. The workload is insane and you have to do so much independent study and grafting to make up for the non-existent teaching that this uni provides. Again, this is only my take on it. Other students might say different but I wish I knew what I knew now before making the decision to study here. If I was you; I would take my efforts elsewhere to a university that has better quality teaching/resources.
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bassplayer347
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UCL honestly sounds like an awful uni. it was my first choice (and still kinda is) but i only hear bad things about it (might apply for Computer Science or ITMB)
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stereotypeasian
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uni isn't meant to be exactly like school where you're spoon fed everything
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bassplayer347
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(Original post by stereotypeasian)
uni isn't meant to be exactly like school where you're spoon fed everything
you're right, i'm sure OP will settle in soon
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stereotypeasian
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also if you look at modules and how they spend their 20 credits , ~80% will be timetabled to be spent on independent study and ~6% on lectures and ~9% on small group work/sessions
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by stereotypeasian)
uni isn't meant to be exactly like school where you're spoon fed everything
I understand that, and I was told by a lot of older people the same thing. But another problem I see on top of the awful teaching is also that the resources/lecture notes/recommended texts they provide are not helpful at all for independent study either. So it becomes increasingly difficult to try and grasp the concepts and the questions at all. Maths is one of those subjects that is incredibly hard to self teach without the right resources/help. We’re having to scavenge online for any kind of help/videos. So it sort of brings up the question: “Why are we paying £9k a year if we are having to do all the hard work ourselves?”. I was getting better quality teaching at school which I didn’t pay a single penny for (and I went to a really low performing school as well).
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by bassplayer347)
UCL honestly sounds like an awful uni. it was my first choice (and still kinda is) but i only hear bad things about it (might apply for Computer Science or ITMB)
What was you initially looking to apply for?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by stereotypeasian)
also if you look at modules and how they spend their 20 credits , ~80% will be timetabled to be spent on independent study and ~6% on lectures and ~9% on small group work/sessions
Really? Could I ask where you found it? I need to look this up.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I understand that, and I was told by a lot of older people the same thing. But another problem I see on top of the awful teaching is also that the resources/lecture notes/recommended texts they provide are not helpful at all for independent study either. So it becomes increasingly difficult to try and grasp the concepts and the questions at all. Maths is one of those subjects that is incredibly hard to self teach without the right resources/help. We’re having to scavenge online for any kind of help/videos. So it sort of brings up the question: “Why are we paying £9k a year if we are having to do all the hard work ourselves?”. I was getting better quality teaching at school which I didn’t pay a single penny for (and I went to a really low performing school as well).
I'm sorry to hear this - I'd heard UCL was bad and this just confirms it. Can you look into a transfer?
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stereotypeasian
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Really? Could I ask where you found it? I need to look this up.
I found it by averaging out BSc degrees , try looking it up on course options on blackboard learn or your uni's online platforms ? or any early documents sent to you during/before freshers

(Original post by Anonymous)
I understand that, and I was told by a lot of older people the same thing. But another problem I see on top of the awful teaching is also that the resources/lecture notes/recommended texts they provide are not helpful at all for independent study either. So it becomes increasingly difficult to try and grasp the concepts and the questions at all. Maths is one of those subjects that is incredibly hard to self teach without the right resources/help. We’re having to scavenge online for any kind of help/videos. So it sort of brings up the question: “Why are we paying £9k a year if we are having to do all the hard work ourselves?”. I was getting better quality teaching at school which I didn’t pay a single penny for (and I went to a really low performing school as well).
thank you for proving to everyone that Russell Group =/= prestige or "good uni" and to anyone that believes that they need to go to a RG to be successful or its the end of the world
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by Muttley79)
I'm sorry to hear this - I'd heard UCL was bad and this just confirms it. Can you look into a transfer?
I can't speak for other courses at UCL though (I've heard medicine is pretty good so not sure). Ermm the thing is, it's not that I don't enjoy the course. If I was to transfer I would have no idea on what to transfer to and I know I would enjoy the course less and be less motivated.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by stereotypeasian)
I found it by averaging out BSc degrees , try looking it up on course options on blackboard learn or your uni's online platforms ? or any early documents sent to you during/before freshers


thank you for proving to everyone that Russell Group =/= prestige or "good uni" and to anyone that believes that they need to go to a RG to be successful or its the end of the world
Yep, facts. I would probably even go as far as saying you don't even need to go to A uni to be successful. I meant going to a Russell Group uni does increase your employability chances but I think the biggest lesson I've learnt is that going to a "better" uni doesn't mean better teaching/resources etc.
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HoldThisL
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are you literally in your first term? yeah its going to be different and challenging lol. you've not got used to it yet
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yep, facts. I would probably even go as far as saying you don't even need to go to A uni to be successful. I meant going to a Russell Group uni does increase your employability chances but I think the biggest lesson I've learnt is that going to a "better" uni doesn't mean better teaching/resources etc.
That's just not true either these days - a year in industry is more valuable in Engineering and Computing and a few other careers. Companies don't want people with just theoretical knowledge these days.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yep, facts. I would probably even go as far as saying you don't even need to go to A uni to be successful. I meant going to a Russell Group uni does increase your employability chances but I think the biggest lesson I've learnt is that going to a "better" uni doesn't mean better teaching/resources etc.
That's just not true either these days - a year in industry is more valuable in Engineering and Computing and a few other careers. Companies don't want people with just theoretical knowledge these days.
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ameobi
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As someone who also is a Maths student at UCL, I presume the difficult subject you are talking about is Applied Maths 1 (Its so badly taught and the lecturer will just skip through a lot of the method when solving a question). UCL isn't that bad though, the work load is worse at Oxford, Cambs and Imperial for Maths. BSc Mathematics is not at all an easy degree, especially as UCL is also one of the top unis. At least you're not at LSE, there is much worse horror stories from LSE about standard of teaching and resources available.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by ameobi)
As someone who also is a Maths student at UCL, I presume the difficult subject you are talking about is Applied Maths 1 (Its so badly taught and the lecturer will just skip through a lot of the method when solving a question). UCL isn't that bad though, the work load is worse at Oxford, Cambs and Imperial for Maths. BSc Mathematics is not at all an easy degree, especially as UCL is also one of the top unis. At least you're not at LSE, there is much worse horror stories from LSE about standard of teaching and resources available.
Omg ikr! I was thinking the same thing about her , the Applied Maths lecturer is so bad. Yep, like the workload is definitely worse at those three uni’s (and probably Warwick as well) but I think there’s also an extra workload for all the independent study you have to do to make up for the bad teaching. Sheesh 😦 I didn’t expect that from LSE though.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Any A-Level/Gap-year students who is wishing to study Mathematics at UCL. I want to send a word of warning to y'all. I've got a message for you guys as a current Mathematics student at UCL.
Just know that if you do end up getting a place at UCL at Maths, it's going to be HELL! I can't vouch for other universities but just know that Mathematics at UCL is nothing like how it is taught at school. Some lecturers here do not teach the modules at all and expect you to complete quizzes/coursework's/assignments every week with such challenging questions that they never taught you how to do. One module (Applied Maths) in first year is taught so badly, that only people who did A-Level Physics/Mechanics are able to understand and do the questions. The requirements are that you only need Maths and Further Maths but honestly, people who don't do A-Level Physics are also at a real disadvantage on this course. The workload is insane and you have to do so much independent study and grafting to make up for the non-existent teaching that this uni provides. Again, this is only my take on it. Other students might say different but I wish I knew what I knew now before making the decision to study here. If I was you; I would take my efforts elsewhere to a university that has better quality teaching/resources.
Sounds like you need to spend more time adjusting to the university way of doing things.

Teaching is a misnomer at university, certainly at the competitive universities. Lecturers don't teach, the lecture, they show you information and that's it. University is much more self-directed than school, so students need to take that information and work out for themselves how best to a) learn it and b) apply it. It's not like school where they try to present things in multiple ways for the various different learning styles etc. At uni you are expected to manage that personalisation yourself.

So University really is at least 9-5, 5 days a week. Contact time is just the injection of information, the non-contact time is where the student is supposed to learn the information, work out how it connects to other information, how to apply it etc from the very brief description they've had. It's the transition to research where as a PhD student you are seeking new information yourself without that framework.
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Sinnoh
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So it sort of brings up the question: “Why are we paying £9k a year if we are having to do all the hard work ourselves?”. I was getting better quality teaching at school which I didn’t pay a single penny for (and I went to a really low performing school as well).
We pay so that the government doesn't have to, that's basically it.
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ameobi
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Omg ikr! I was thinking the same thing about her , the Applied Maths lecturer is so bad. Yep, like the workload is definitely worse at those three uni’s (and probably Warwick as well) but I think there’s also an extra workload for all the independent study you have to do to make up for the bad teaching. Sheesh 😦 I didn’t expect that from LSE though.
I thought analysis was bad originally, but now I love it. I've gone from loving mechanics and finding it easy to now hating it because of Applied, and I feel like its just because of the lectures. Yeah Warwick and Durham will have very similar workloads, in fact the workload is still very similar to oxbridge. Trust me, LSE's teaching quality is absolute garbage, UCL is much better than LSE in that regard. Going to LSE is more of a title than actually being any good, I mean job prospects out the other end are pretty good, but the experience itself is likely very dire.
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