Leo_gyp
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Does any one has a case study that they did for extreme uk weather with their social economic and environmental impact and management strategies to reduce risk from weather hazards and the cause?
Thank you
0
reply
Deggs_14
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Extreme weather events in the U.K. I think are likely to refer to flooding. Here’s a case study on the BBC Bitesize about flooding they you might be interested in. https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guide...frd/revision/5
0
reply
hopebagel
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Cockermouth floods is a good case study and it covers social economic+environmental impacts, this is what I learned anyway at GCSE
0
reply
ArtmisKco
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
The big freeze is one! I think you’ll remember it when you were a child. It was the year we get lots of snow!
0
reply
milliebaudot
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
firstly, sorry if this is too late and secondly, sorry it is so long - there are four UK case studies here that I looked at for GCSE - hope something helps

Case Study – Beast from the East (February and March 2018):
- Great Britain and Ireland were affected by a wave of unusually cold temperatures and heavy snowfall.
- Up to 50cm snow at the start of March in some areas.
- The UK became a victim of the northern polar jet stream, which twisted its direction unexpectedly, drawing in cold air from the east. The bending was caused by a jump in temperatures over the Arctic, known as a sudden stratospheric warming. The unexpected warming weakened the jet stream that brings warm air in from the Atlantic to Britain and Ireland. And so cold air from thousands of miles away is dragged over to the UK, bringing a severe chill. The warming of arctic temperatures has risen little by little over the years. Even though there was no sun from October to the spring time, there were times when the arctic was warmer and London and Paris.
- Social impacts – many coastal areas were issued with flood warnings, thousands of schools and shops were forced to close, road accidents and closures led to congestion and some drivers remained waiting for over 12 hours, 17 deaths in the UK (95 overall), the AA estimated that there over 8000 road collisions during this period.
- Environmental impacts – as much as 50cm of snow settled in areas such as Dartmoor and Exmoor, some rural areas experienced lows of -12c, the snow settled because of cold temperatures, strong winds of 60-70m high, snow drifts up to 7m high, Scottish premiership postponed its games, there were worries that the UK would run out of gas.
- Economic impacts – British Airways cancelled a huge number of flights, shops and businesses were forced to close so lost large amounts of money, some rural towns/ villages were cut off for days so couldn’t access food and medical care, the weather cost the UK millions - £10 million in just 3 days on just car insurance.
- Immediate responses – stranded drivers got foil blankets, the army were called into help, gritters and snow ploughs, drivers of a Gregg’s delivery van gave out free food to stranded drivers (A1 near Newcastle), Cleveland Mountain Rescue took nurses around rural elderly patients in East Cleveland and North Yorkshire Moors, the army and RAF ferried health workers around blocked roads.
- Long term responses – the met office issued red warnings for several areas and all roads were heavily gritted.

Case Study – Summer Heatwave (2018):
- Europe and the British Isles were affected in June, July and August by extremely hot weather and wildfires in areas.
- The highest temperature was 35.3c in Faversham, Kent.
- Wildfires badly affected Northern Moorland areas around the Greater Manchester Area and Saddleworth Moor.
- In late February, there was a sudden warming in the stratosphere which sent winds across the whole Northern Hemisphere. Large meanders in the jet stream led to develop huge anticyclones which are areas of high pressure that can stay in the same place for weeks. This causes cold, bitter temperatures on the winter and hot, dry temperatures in the summer. In a high pressure system, air from upper levels of our atmosphere is pulled towards the ground, where it becomes compressed and increases in temperature. The high pressure inhibits that wind which makes the wind either faint or non-existent.
- Social impacts – at least 700 more deaths that usual during the 15 day peak of the heatwave, airless train carriages, heat buckling the train tracks, dogs had to be walked early or late so that they could breathe properly
- Environmental impacts – green vegetation turned brown, herbivores and bugs struggled to eat, water levels fell and animals struggled for water, fires destroyed massive areas of land.
- Economic impacts – positive for UKs tourism, Christmas trees didn’t grow properly so were more expensive, sales of barbecues and paddling pools increased, sales of sun cream, sunglasses and ice cream also increased.
- Immediate responses – hosepipe ban, windows shut to avoid fire smoke getting in, some people filled paddling pools with water to help local ducks and animals, people were told to try and stay out of the sun between 11am and 3pm
- Long term responses – heat plan by the NHS was released for England – showed how to cope and how we’d be informed of anything, installing fans and coolers in all buildings in case of future heatwaves, people were told to have thermometers in their bedrooms and living rooms to make sure it was a safe temperature.

Case Study – Tewkesbury Floods (2007):
- Mainly affected Tewkesbury but also Gloucestershire, Cotswold District, Cheltenham Borough, Stroud District and Forest of Dean District
- 825 homes evacuated, 5,000 homes and businesses were completely flooded and 13 people died
- 48,000 homes were without electricity for at least 2 days, 135,000 homes didn’t have drinking water for up to 17 days
- 10,000 motorists were stranded on county roads and the M5, flood water reached 7 feet in some places
- 40 million bottles of drinking water were distributed, the estimated repair costs for the roads was £25 million
- Responses: RAF helicopters, fire fighters, coast guards, life guards, ambulances, police, army and navy
- Causes: heavy rainfall (414.1mm of rain fell across England and Wales in May, June and July 2007, no flood defences in Tewkesbury, buildings were on top of flood plains, vulnerable to flooding because of the River Severn and River Avon flowing through Tewkesbury, the water couldn’t infiltrate the soil because it was already saturated because of the rain and there was a very small amount of sunshine so not much water was evaporated

Case Study – Somerset Floods UK (2014):
- The Somerset Levels is an area located along the West Coast of the South of England. It is an area of roughly 650km2. The southern areas of the Levels such as Langport were the worst affected. Areas where the River Tone and River Parrett flow through saw the most flooding.
- It was the wettest January since 1910. Areas of low pressure driven across the Atlantic Ocean brought a period of wet weather lasting several weeks. About 350mm of rain fell in January and February. High tides and storm surges swept water up the rivers from the Bristol Channel. This prevented water from reaching the sea so it spilled over the riverbanks. Rivers had not been dredged for at least 20 years, and had become clogged with sediment.
- Social impacts – cut off from other areas, fire engines and ambulances couldn’t get access, over 600 houses completely flooded, 16 farms evacuated, residents evacuated for several months, power supplies cut off.
- Economic impacts – Somerset County Council estimated flood damage to cost 10 million, over 14,000ha of agricultural land under water for 3-4 weeks, over 10,000 livestock evacuated, local roads cut off by floods, rail way line closed.
- Environmental impacts – floodwaters heavily contaminated with sewage and other pollutants including oil and chemicals, a huge amount of debris had to be cleared, stagnant water that had collected for months had to be reoxygenated before being pumped back into rivers.
- Immediate responses – as the floodwaters spread out, homeowners coped as best they could, villagers cut off by the floods used boats to go shopping/ to school/ to work, local community groups and volunteers gave invaluable support.
- Long-term responses – a £20 million flood action plan was launched, in March 2014, 8km of the rivers were dredged, road levels were raised to maintain communications and enable businesses to continue during future floods, vulnerable communities had flood defences, riverbanks were strengthened and pumping stations were built, consideration will be given to a tidal barrage at Bridgewater (by 2024)
2
reply
Leo_gyp
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by milliebaudot)
firstly, sorry if this is too late and secondly, sorry it is so long - there are four UK case studies here that I looked at for GCSE - hope something helps

Case Study – Beast from the East (February and March 2018):
- Great Britain and Ireland were affected by a wave of unusually cold temperatures and heavy snowfall.
- Up to 50cm snow at the start of March in some areas.
- The UK became a victim of the northern polar jet stream, which twisted its direction unexpectedly, drawing in cold air from the east. The bending was caused by a jump in temperatures over the Arctic, known as a sudden stratospheric warming. The unexpected warming weakened the jet stream that brings warm air in from the Atlantic to Britain and Ireland. And so cold air from thousands of miles away is dragged over to the UK, bringing a severe chill. The warming of arctic temperatures has risen little by little over the years. Even though there was no sun from October to the spring time, there were times when the arctic was warmer and London and Paris.
- Social impacts – many coastal areas were issued with flood warnings, thousands of schools and shops were forced to close, road accidents and closures led to congestion and some drivers remained waiting for over 12 hours, 17 deaths in the UK (95 overall), the AA estimated that there over 8000 road collisions during this period.
- Environmental impacts – as much as 50cm of snow settled in areas such as Dartmoor and Exmoor, some rural areas experienced lows of -12c, the snow settled because of cold temperatures, strong winds of 60-70m high, snow drifts up to 7m high, Scottish premiership postponed its games, there were worries that the UK would run out of gas.
- Economic impacts – British Airways cancelled a huge number of flights, shops and businesses were forced to close so lost large amounts of money, some rural towns/ villages were cut off for days so couldn’t access food and medical care, the weather cost the UK millions - £10 million in just 3 days on just car insurance.
- Immediate responses – stranded drivers got foil blankets, the army were called into help, gritters and snow ploughs, drivers of a Gregg’s delivery van gave out free food to stranded drivers (A1 near Newcastle), Cleveland Mountain Rescue took nurses around rural elderly patients in East Cleveland and North Yorkshire Moors, the army and RAF ferried health workers around blocked roads.
- Long term responses – the met office issued red warnings for several areas and all roads were heavily gritted.

Case Study – Summer Heatwave (2018):
- Europe and the British Isles were affected in June, July and August by extremely hot weather and wildfires in areas.
- The highest temperature was 35.3c in Faversham, Kent.
- Wildfires badly affected Northern Moorland areas around the Greater Manchester Area and Saddleworth Moor.
- In late February, there was a sudden warming in the stratosphere which sent winds across the whole Northern Hemisphere. Large meanders in the jet stream led to develop huge anticyclones which are areas of high pressure that can stay in the same place for weeks. This causes cold, bitter temperatures on the winter and hot, dry temperatures in the summer. In a high pressure system, air from upper levels of our atmosphere is pulled towards the ground, where it becomes compressed and increases in temperature. The high pressure inhibits that wind which makes the wind either faint or non-existent.
- Social impacts – at least 700 more deaths that usual during the 15 day peak of the heatwave, airless train carriages, heat buckling the train tracks, dogs had to be walked early or late so that they could breathe properly
- Environmental impacts – green vegetation turned brown, herbivores and bugs struggled to eat, water levels fell and animals struggled for water, fires destroyed massive areas of land.
- Economic impacts – positive for UKs tourism, Christmas trees didn’t grow properly so were more expensive, sales of barbecues and paddling pools increased, sales of sun cream, sunglasses and ice cream also increased.
- Immediate responses – hosepipe ban, windows shut to avoid fire smoke getting in, some people filled paddling pools with water to help local ducks and animals, people were told to try and stay out of the sun between 11am and 3pm
- Long term responses – heat plan by the NHS was released for England – showed how to cope and how we’d be informed of anything, installing fans and coolers in all buildings in case of future heatwaves, people were told to have thermometers in their bedrooms and living rooms to make sure it was a safe temperature.

Case Study – Tewkesbury Floods (2007):
- Mainly affected Tewkesbury but also Gloucestershire, Cotswold District, Cheltenham Borough, Stroud District and Forest of Dean District
- 825 homes evacuated, 5,000 homes and businesses were completely flooded and 13 people died
- 48,000 homes were without electricity for at least 2 days, 135,000 homes didn’t have drinking water for up to 17 days
- 10,000 motorists were stranded on county roads and the M5, flood water reached 7 feet in some places
- 40 million bottles of drinking water were distributed, the estimated repair costs for the roads was £25 million
- Responses: RAF helicopters, fire fighters, coast guards, life guards, ambulances, police, army and navy
- Causes: heavy rainfall (414.1mm of rain fell across England and Wales in May, June and July 2007, no flood defences in Tewkesbury, buildings were on top of flood plains, vulnerable to flooding because of the River Severn and River Avon flowing through Tewkesbury, the water couldn’t infiltrate the soil because it was already saturated because of the rain and there was a very small amount of sunshine so not much water was evaporated

Case Study – Somerset Floods UK (2014):
- The Somerset Levels is an area located along the West Coast of the South of England. It is an area of roughly 650km2. The southern areas of the Levels such as Langport were the worst affected. Areas where the River Tone and River Parrett flow through saw the most flooding.
- It was the wettest January since 1910. Areas of low pressure driven across the Atlantic Ocean brought a period of wet weather lasting several weeks. About 350mm of rain fell in January and February. High tides and storm surges swept water up the rivers from the Bristol Channel. This prevented water from reaching the sea so it spilled over the riverbanks. Rivers had not been dredged for at least 20 years, and had become clogged with sediment.
- Social impacts – cut off from other areas, fire engines and ambulances couldn’t get access, over 600 houses completely flooded, 16 farms evacuated, residents evacuated for several months, power supplies cut off.
- Economic impacts – Somerset County Council estimated flood damage to cost 10 million, over 14,000ha of agricultural land under water for 3-4 weeks, over 10,000 livestock evacuated, local roads cut off by floods, rail way line closed.
- Environmental impacts – floodwaters heavily contaminated with sewage and other pollutants including oil and chemicals, a huge amount of debris had to be cleared, stagnant water that had collected for months had to be reoxygenated before being pumped back into rivers.
- Immediate responses – as the floodwaters spread out, homeowners coped as best they could, villagers cut off by the floods used boats to go shopping/ to school/ to work, local community groups and volunteers gave invaluable support.
- Long-term responses – a £20 million flood action plan was launched, in March 2014, 8km of the rivers were dredged, road levels were raised to maintain communications and enable businesses to continue during future floods, vulnerable communities had flood defences, riverbanks were strengthened and pumping stations were built, consideration will be given to a tidal barrage at Bridgewater (by 2024)
Thank you so much, I was finding this really hard cause all text books they did not show the social economic etc but on the specification it show you need to know them. I really appreciate the time and effort you put in very useful content on summer heatwave which I will use thank you so much👍🏻👏🏻👊🏻
1
reply
milliebaudot
Badges: 6
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 week ago
#7
(Original post by Leo_gyp)
Thank you so much, I was finding this really hard cause all text books they did not show the social economic etc but on the specification it show you need to know them. I really appreciate the time and effort you put in very useful content on summer heatwave which I will use thank you so much👍🏻👏🏻👊🏻
no problem at all, glad I could help!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (103)
28.69%
No - I have already returned home (46)
12.81%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (69)
19.22%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (37)
10.31%
No - I live at home during term anyway (104)
28.97%

Watched Threads

View All