Different ways to revise

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The University of Law Students
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Every one works differently, and different methods help people retain information better than others. It’s completely dependent on the individual so you need to find what suits you!

These are the ways I revise best:
- going over the lecture and seminar STRAIGHT after it’s been taught. This is key for me. By going over it straight away, I fix any notes that aren’t complete and make sure to flag up anything I don’t fully understand to my teachers
- re complete all of the tasks. During exam season, I re do all preparatory tasks, multiple choice questions, scenarios, essays... anything that we’ve done! I do it in exam conditions and review my answers. I do this a couple times, spaced out over the weeks
- do all mocks and specimen papers, multiple times throughout the term. These really are the best way to practice the real exam. I always attempt them in exam conditions (so no notes) and then check my answers with the examplar ones! Of course, the first time you won’t get everything... but practice really does make perfect!
- re typing lecture notes. I done this in my second and third year. I initially hand write as I’m quicker like that. I then re typed them out afterwards / at the end of the week or semester so that it all went through my mind again. I definitely
Liked doing this. However, now I’m in my fourth year (doing my LPC), I don’t actually have the time!
- flash cards. I’ve used these a few times before. If you have the time to make them they are definitely worth it in my opinion! Going through them each day really helps to retain the info. I’ve done this revision technique since GCSE’s

Other ways to revise:
- diagrams
- teaching someone else the subject matter. Everyone always says the best way to learn is to teach it to someone else!
- mind maps
- revising with others - I’ve tried this with flash cards and mates before but it personally doesn’t work for me

What’s your favourite way to revise? Do
You have any good tips?

Tasha :-)
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LMT888
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Hey,

I am a mature student and have struggled with revision so thank you for putting this up. Similar to yourself, I check my notes and fix them, re-write them, sometimes re-write them again as I find the writing them out helps me. I also use flash cards and have found that they help a lot as they are small, fit in any bag and have key main points which goes in better than pages of notes. As mentioned, I prefer writing things down as I am able to retain things better this way. I like to write what I think I know, then compare it to what I actually should know. When explaining things like a study in Psychology, for instance, I write it like I am telling a story then go back and tweak it if needed.

I also find that brain storming sometimes helps, especially when a question or topic is not quite registering. Which is currently the case with one of my subjects at the moment! Mind maps too can be really useful and good for pulling stuff together.

L x
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The University of Law Students
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(Original post by LMT888)
Hey,

I am a mature student and have struggled with revision so thank you for putting this up. Similar to yourself, I check my notes and fix them, re-write them, sometimes re-write them again as I find the writing them out helps me. I also use flash cards and have found that they help a lot as they are small, fit in any bag and have key main points which goes in better than pages of notes. As mentioned, I prefer writing things down as I am able to retain things better this way. I like to write what I think I know, then compare it to what I actually should know. When explaining things like a study in Psychology, for instance, I write it like I am telling a story then go back and tweak it if needed.

I also find that brain storming sometimes helps, especially when a question or topic is not quite registering. Which is currently the case with one of my subjects at the moment! Mind maps too can be really useful and good for pulling stuff together.

L x
Yay glad it is useful!

We sound VERY alike in the way we learn! I too write out numerous times and like to compare my answers to specimens to see what I’ve missed etc... one of my teachers once said the best way to learn is by being wrong and I truly believe that! It always sticks in my brain more when I compare my answers to a “perfect” answer and see what I missed/ did wrong!

The story bit is a great idea I may adopt that! And I haven’t really tried the brain storming or mind mapping but I will try those too as I’m learning a lot of new content at the moment!

Tasha :-)
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Arden University
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With mature students it is important to acknowledge that you often have a very different set of responsibilities to a lot of younger students, this might be full time work, child and care responsibilities, so I, as a 33 year old learner have adapted my learning to go through things at speed to make the most of my time. Things I have experimented with include;

1) listening to lectures whilst on public transport to and from work
2) explaining what I have learnt that day to my partner as they say if you want to learn something, teach it
3) Mind maps tend to work well
4) I just ignore SPAG (spelling, punctuation and grammar) whilst working, and I fine tune that in the final draft

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
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The University of Law Students
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(Original post by Arden University)
With mature students it is important to acknowledge that you often have a very different set of responsibilities to a lot of younger students, this might be full time work, child and care responsibilities, so I, as a 33 year old learner have adapted my learning to go through things at speed to make the most of my time. Things I have experimented with include;

1) listening to lectures whilst on public transport to and from work
2) explaining what I have learnt that day to my partner as they say if you want to learn something, teach it
3) Mind maps tend to work well
4) I just ignore SPAG (spelling, punctuation and grammar) whilst working, and I fine tune that in the final draft

Marc
Arden University Student Ambassador
Very good tips!

When I travelled, I often listened to lectures on trains etc! And yes the point about learning best when teaching it to someone else is true, it’s such a good way to revise!

I am going to try 4) of yours so thank you :-)
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tinygirl96
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Flashcards.
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The University of Law Students
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
Flashcards.
Yes these are very popular & for good reason!
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