zafreenfarooque
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I'm on a PGCE primary placement- is anyone else really hating it!
I'm in early years, with not much experience of being in school. I've done the academic side fine, but it is really not what I expected at all.
It is really hard to get the kids to respect me, even with non-verbal signs so I end up shouting a lot. There are some special needs kids that really need to be in a special school, I mean I've seen this kid run around screaming in lessons, being very disruptive and chased by a poor, hapless TA!
I have a mentor that is arrogant and talks down to me, to the point I get easily shouted at for asking what she considers a stupid question!
Sometimes I could really do with a coffee break and I was told there are no breaks in early years.
The Uni tutor isn't much better, asking for basically 100s of forms which I find hard to keep up with, and the lesson planning is difficult for every single thing I must say or do! In addition, I'm expected to buy props and sometimes stationery for the class despite not being well off!
It's got to the point I dread going into school, I can't stand being in the staff room for lunch or even having lunch....I feel depressed during the week.
As a mature student coming from an office background I am starting to think I've made a mistake..I mean I have all the qualifications to do the teaching course, but I feel unprepared for the actual teaching that has to be done.
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meaghan sharp
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I was like this in my second placement- but not early years. It sounds like a **** atmosphere, and it may be that you have the wrong training provider and not the wrong career....?

yearly years staff do/should get the regulated breaks like everyone else, I would assume that there is a law about that. It may be useful to sing up with one of the teaching unions (free while studying to be a teacher) and that will give you legal cover and a vast amount of advice from people who are not assosiated with your training provider or school.

I was a mature student and thought that I would want to be in KS1 however, I found out quickly that I am better suited to KS2. Although they are still primary aged children the difference in the classroom is vast.
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Get into Teaching
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Hi @zafreenforooque,

Sorry to hear you are not having a great time on placement, every school is different as is every cohort you teach, so I wouldn't give up yet. There are many little things that you can do to gain the respect and control of the children within a class. I used to use a tiny cuddle toy, I would give it a name and introduce it to the children, even make up a story about it. I would say it likes to sit on tables that are working well and sensibly, then I would place it on that table and move it round when needed. This worked well within the Early years in fact they loved it and it meant I never had to shout! Try to reach out to other members of the school and see if there is any other teachers/TAs that would help, its good if possible to observe as many as you can. Also just reading round on behaviour management will help as there lots great ways to gain their respect, mine is just one example and worked for me but there are so many others.
Hope that helps
Olivia
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zafreenfarooque
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(Original post by Get into Teaching)
Hi @zafreenforooque,

Sorry to hear you are not having a great time on placement, every school is different as is every cohort you teach, so I wouldn't give up yet. There are many little things that you can do to gain the respect and control of the children within a class. I used to use a tiny cuddle toy, I would give it a name and introduce it to the children, even make up a story about it. I would say it likes to sit on tables that are working well and sensibly, then I would place it on that table and move it round when needed. This worked well within the Early years in fact they loved it and it meant I never had to shout! Try to reach out to other members of the school and see if there is any other teachers/TAs that would help, its good if possible to observe as many as you can. Also just reading round on behaviour management will help as there lots great ways to gain their respect, mine is just one example and worked for me but there are so many others.
Hope that helps
Olivia
Thanks Olivia
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zafreenfarooque
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(Original post by meaghan sharp)
I was like this in my second placement- but not early years. It sounds like a **** atmosphere, and it may be that you have the wrong training provider and not the wrong career....?

yearly years staff do/should get the regulated breaks like everyone else, I would assume that there is a law about that. It may be useful to sing up with one of the teaching unions (free while studying to be a teacher) and that will give you legal cover and a vast amount of advice from people who are not assosiated with your training provider or school.

I was a mature student and thought that I would want to be in KS1 however, I found out quickly that I am better suited to KS2. Although they are still primary aged children the difference in the classroom is vast.
Thanks a lot
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by zafreenfarooque)
I'm on a PGCE primary placement- is anyone else really hating it!
I'm in early years, with not much experience of being in school. I've done the academic side fine, but it is really not what I expected at all.
It is really hard to get the kids to respect me, even with non-verbal signs so I end up shouting a lot. There are some special needs kids that really need to be in a special school, I mean I've seen this kid run around screaming in lessons, being very disruptive and chased by a poor, hapless TA!
I have a mentor that is arrogant and talks down to me, to the point I get easily shouted at for asking what she considers a stupid question!
Sometimes I could really do with a coffee break and I was told there are no breaks in early years.
The Uni tutor isn't much better, asking for basically 100s of forms which I find hard to keep up with, and the lesson planning is difficult for every single thing I must say or do! In addition, I'm expected to buy props and sometimes stationery for the class despite not being well off!
It's got to the point I dread going into school, I can't stand being in the staff room for lunch or even having lunch....I feel depressed during the week.
As a mature student coming from an office background I am starting to think I've made a mistake..I mean I have all the qualifications to do the teaching course, but I feel unprepared for the actual teaching that has to be done.
Legally, you're entitled to a 20 minute lunch break, and that's it- and there will be days when you don't get that. You mention eating lunch, so it sounds like you are getting this? It is ****, but that is the nature of teaching in the UK. If that's not for you, that's fine, but it's something to bear in mind. As a PGCE student, you should have free periods built into your timetable, though- this is your chance to have a coffee etc.

You do sounds a little naive about the reality of UK schools. It is really hard to get students into special schools, and unless children have fairly severe SEN, they will usually start in mainstream, and many students will start primary school with unidentified SEN needs, and may transition to special school or gain extra support which helps them cope in mainstream.

The expectation to buy things as a teacher is really annoying, and as a student I would push back against this and your mentor does sound tricky, but she is likely under a lot of stress this term.

The paperwork is just part of the nature of the PGCE- it is a massive PITA, and stressful, but once you are through the PGCE, the level of paperwork does go down.

I would try and get through to placement 2, as you may find you respond to KS2 students better and prefer that environment, but if your mental health is suffering, then do talk to your GP about it. Teaching just isn't right for some people, and there is no shame in admitting that.

(Original post by meaghan sharp)
I was like this in my second placement- but not early years. It sounds like a **** atmosphere, and it may be that you have the wrong training provider and not the wrong career....?

yearly years staff do/should get the regulated breaks like everyone else, I would assume that there is a law about that. It may be useful to sing up with one of the teaching unions (free while studying to be a teacher) and that will give you legal cover and a vast amount of advice from people who are not assosiated with your training provider or school.

I was a mature student and thought that I would want to be in KS1 however, I found out quickly that I am better suited to KS2. Although they are still primary aged children the difference in the classroom is vast.
Your entitlement to a break is 20 minutes for lunch, that's it. It sounds like OP is getting this, but asking for additional breaks, which realistically won't fly in most schools. I'm not saying this is right or wrong, but that's what you're legally entitled to.
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DrTomato
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Paperwork... that's to be expected in this profession.

Annoying mentors... we all have one of those. Mine missed key things during my first formal observation, like the fact I formally warned students about their behaviour, but then at the end she said I should have given them a formal warning... duh.

Bad behaviour... it's mostly down to bad parenting and SEN is just an excuse imho. I had two year 9's throw water over each other and another drew graffiti on my whiteboard.

Buying props... try to use what you have lying at home and buy stickers and stuff in bulk from China.

Around a third of our kids have some kind of issue... there aren't enough special needs places in the whole county for that cohort!!!

We just gotta take each day as it comes and not be quitters.
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tinygirl96
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Keep going for now op
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bwilliams
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(Original post by zafreenfarooque)
I'm on a PGCE primary placement- is anyone else really hating it!
I'm in early years, with not much experience of being in school. I've done the academic side fine, but it is really not what I expected at all.
It is really hard to get the kids to respect me, even with non-verbal signs so I end up shouting a lot. There are some special needs kids that really need to be in a special school, I mean I've seen this kid run around screaming in lessons, being very disruptive and chased by a poor, hapless TA!
I have a mentor that is arrogant and talks down to me, to the point I get easily shouted at for asking what she considers a stupid question!
Sometimes I could really do with a coffee break and I was told there are no breaks in early years.
The Uni tutor isn't much better, asking for basically 100s of forms which I find hard to keep up with, and the lesson planning is difficult for every single thing I must say or do! In addition, I'm expected to buy props and sometimes stationery for the class despite not being well off!
It's got to the point I dread going into school, I can't stand being in the staff room for lunch or even having lunch....I feel depressed during the week.
As a mature student coming from an office background I am starting to think I've made a mistake..I mean I have all the qualifications to do the teaching course, but I feel unprepared for the actual teaching that has to be done.
Hello

I understand why you could be struggling with this. Unfortunately, much of what you are saying is the norm. Some children find it difficult to cope with the transition to school and you will find this a lot in Early Years. Children can be very disruptive but this is likely due to their individual needs. It isn't about 'sending them to a special school' it's about you becoming inclusive enough for them to work alongside you in mainstream. I'm not saying this comes in the PGCE year or even after your NQT year - it is something you work on your whole career. Try and see it from that child's perspective.

I did chuckle with the 'no breaks in Early Years'. This is true you don't usually break in EYFS but they are being a bit harsh here. You normally just take some break as and when. As it's placement 1, you shouldn't really have much on at the moment... if you do, you need to discuss this with your link tutor.

Your school mentor sounds interesting - nothing is a stupid question. Maybe she has forgotten what it was like to be a student. Remember she will be under immense pressure under the current circumstances. We are all struggling so take things with a pinch of salt as it is unlikely to be personal to you.

It's sad to hear you say those things - if you are really passionate about continuing and need further support feel free to PM me.
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