medicalstudent20
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Hey Guys ,

I am a British medical graduate , just graduated from Bulgaria , gonna get my GMC number hopefully in January ( 6 years course).
I am currently really interested in neurosurgery , could someone walk me thro the process. I was an average medical student so I'm not sure what my chances are.
does anyone know how do they choose the applicants for ST.

Many Thanks.
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ecolier
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(Original post by medicalstudent20)
... I was an average medical student so I'm not sure what my chances are.
Pretty low. Have you done any neurosurgery related additional things?

Publications / presentations / audits etc. etc.?

If not you'll need to be prepared to take a gap year (or several) to locum in the specialty to gain the experience and the contacts.

It's not impossible but it is hard.

Last year, 154 applicants competed for 24 spaces. Competition ratio was 6.54 to 1.

does anyone know how do they choose the applicants for ST.

Many Thanks.
Have a look here: https://www.yorksandhumberdeanery.nh...t3_recruitment

The personal specification is here: https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk...ST1%202021.pdf
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medicalstudent20
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(Original post by ecolier)
Pretty low. Have you done any neurosurgery related additional things?

Publications / presentations / audits etc. etc.?

If not you'll need to be prepared to take a gap year (or several) to locum in the specialty to gain the experience and the contacts.

It's not impossible but it is hard.

Last year, 154 applicants competed for 24 spaces. Competition ratio was 6.54 to 1.



Have a look here: https://www.yorksandhumberdeanery.nh...t3_recruitment

The personal specification is here: https://specialtytraining.hee.nhs.uk...ST1%202021.pdf
Thank you for your reply.
I haven't done any of the things you have mentioned as i just graduated this month.
I was thinking of taking a trust grade F1/F2 post , and start preparing but I'm not exactly sure what to prepare or what experience to gain hence my question. if you could help me with the information , i will be grateful.

Many Thanks,
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ecolier
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(Original post by medicalstudent20)
Thank you for your reply.
I haven't done any of the things you have mentioned as i just graduated this month.
You can do it during medical school though.

People come to me asking for neurology experience / extra stuff from when they're in Year 1!

And in the med school I teach, the aspiring neurosurgeons certainly make themselves known early. They intercalate, maybe do an MSc and go into theatre all the time. They attend (doctor and med student) neurosurgery / surgery conferences and lead neuro societies.

Have you done any of that?

I was thinking of taking a trust grade F1/F2 post , and start preparing but I'm not exactly sure what to prepare or what experience to gain hence my question. if you could help me with the information , i will be grateful.

Many Thanks,
See if you can get a job with a neurosurgical rotation. But you wouldn't be able to do all this in 4 months. Most likely you'll need to do your FY1 and FY2, then work a year (at least) as a post-FY2 doctor as an "SHO in Neurosurgery". During which you'll gain the experience, contacts and able to do some projects in neurosurgery.

For competitive specialties - e.g. neurosurgery, cardiothoracics, plastic surgery, even dermatology; you'll have to start preparing as a medical student if you don't want to take years out to improve your CV.
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Cheesychips1
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Hey!

I briefly flirted with the idea of doing neurosurgery at med school. I did a student selected component with the neurosurgery team, did research with them and I got present that at a national conference, did an audit, and went to the SBNS conference as well as medical student days and courses. I would say this is the bare minimum that most neurosurgery-interested med students will have done.

My friend who is an ST1 had neurosurgery publications and presentations, neurosurg elective and taster weeks, had done courses, did an F3 as a clinical fellow in neurosurgery, he also competed in swimming to a national level and was a student rep for something. He'd also intercalated and done a masters in anatomy all about the hippocampus and only got a job in Stoke!

So I would say get started now! Its never too late but might take a few years. You are expected to show clinical skills in the interview, for example 1 year they had brain biopsy, and another was about placing a pedicle screw (uncertain if this is just describing the process - sorry can't give more details).
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ecolier
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(Original post by Cheesychips1)
...I would say this is the bare minimum that most neurosurgery-interested med students will have done....Its never too late but might take a few years...
Absolutely right.

I have a few neurosurgeon friends who didn't (or maybe couldn't) start their specialty training until they are well into their 30s.

On the other hand, I know a couple of neurosurgical STs who got in the first time post-FY2. But they have usually done their prep work prior to med school graduation.
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nexttime
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We were told at a career event at the beginning of 4th year that if you hadn't already started building your neurosurgical CV, it was probably too late. Now that's probably not entirely true - this was a time where multiple years out wasn't really a thing yet so if you're prepared to do that then you can probably compensate. Be prepared for a lot of work though.

Statistically IMGs also do worse in most things so you'll have that barrier too.
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Letournel
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Tend to say this to most of these threads but what you really need is a mentor. You need someone senior to you in the specialty who can guide you through the application process whilst also providing you with the opportunities that will lead to publications/presentations.

I assume you will be seeking a foundation job in a neurosurgical centre, ideally you'll get a neurosurgical rotation but don't wait until this point to start contacting people in the department. The sooner you get going the better.
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