AnonymousLobster
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Hi, I am in my GCSE year and am expecting grades that should be able to allow me to choose from the sixth forms in my area. I haven't even decided which subjects to choose and was hoping I'd just choose the specific sixth form at a later date, as the deadline is much earlier on applying for subjects.


Right now for A-Levels I am considering:

Mathematics- I don't particularly enjoy pure maths but I am quite good at it and do Ad. Maths. I was thinking of it as I need it to do many courses that I might want to do such as Physics or Engineering. I am also trying to get into RG Universities and don't know whether I need to do Ad. Maths.

Philosophy- I really really enjoy philosophy and this is definitely the one I'm most passionate about.

Physics- A requirement for some of the degrees I'm looking at and I enjoy it quite a bit, specifically the bits closest to philosophy (in my brain at least)

Sociology- I also really like the content and the idea behind it, just very interesting me.

Psychology- See Sociology

English Language- I really like linguistics and the psychology and philosophy behind it.

Computer Science- I really like the philosophy and the problem-solving within it.


For IB-
Higher Level Mathematics- As I said I am quite good at Maths and it is required for some of my courses I'm looking at

Higher Level Physics- See A-Level Phys

Higher Level Philosophy/ Psychology/Sociology- See A-level descriptions

Standard Level Comb. English- I wouldn't like the literature part of it but it's alright I guess.

Standard Level [A language]- Probably Italian ab Initio as I am very strong with romance languages

Standard Level Philosophy/ Psychology/Sociology- See A-level descriptions


Please help, I am really struggling to choose. I have also considering doing my EPQ/EE on one of the subjects I cannot do.
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marvelm
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i only know about a levels so, don't do maths unless you know your good at it and sounds like you are tbh. Computing is hard from what ive been told from friends who took it. Sociology is interesting and a good choice if youve done it for gcse too. and if you dont mind some biology, then psychology can be good but learning to answer questions can be tricky. and of course a lot of writing and essays for psychology and sociology so if you dont like that then maybe not ideal.
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AnonymousLobster
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Do you know whether either of the subjects has a lot of memorisation? As opposed to understanding concepts which I much prefer.
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sophssmith_
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As someone who is in their last year of A-Levels, I would go for subjects you are truly, genuinely interested in. If you think you want to do a subject just because you were good at it at GCSE, don't. I did the exact same thing with one of my subjects now that I had an A* in, and I hate it. Don't think about your future job unless you are 100% certain you want to pursue that career. Go for subjects that you know you could listen to and engage with in class. I'm doing Law, Psychology and English Literature; Psychology is definitely a lot of content but I think it is a lot of concepts. You'll have to memorise more at A-Level, so that is part of the deal when entering further education. If you think you can commit yourself to a subject and picture yourself sitting and making notes, go for it! English is the one I struggle, the concept is so different, but you don't have to take all of my advice. Go for subjects you may not think of, as I didn't expect to do Law and now I'm hoping to do a degree in it. Put your comfort zone out the way and try to branch out. But my one piece of advice would be, again reiterating this, to know base your subject decision on your strengths at GCSE - there is a big jump and I know many of my friends have done subjects like Maths and Biology because they did well at GCSE and now hate them.

Good luck, I'm sure everything will work out for you!!
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AnonymousLobster
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(Original post by sophssmith_)
As someone who is in their last year of A-Levels, I would go for subjects you are truly, genuinely interested in. If you think you want to do a subject just because you were good at it at GCSE, don't. I did the exact same thing with one of my subjects now that I had an A* in, and I hate it. Don't think about your future job unless you are 100% certain you want to pursue that career. Go for subjects that you know you could listen to and engage with in class. I'm doing Law, Psychology and English Literature; Psychology is definitely a lot of content but I think it is a lot of concepts. You'll have to memorise more at A-Level, so that is part of the deal when entering further education. If you think you can commit yourself to a subject and picture yourself sitting and making notes, go for it! English is the one I struggle, the concept is so different, but you don't have to take all of my advice. Go for subjects you may not think of, as I didn't expect to do Law and now I'm hoping to do a degree in it. Put your comfort zone out the way and try to branch out. But my one piece of advice would be, again reiterating this, to know base your subject decision on your strengths at GCSE - there is a big jump and I know many of my friends have done subjects like Maths and Biology because they did well at GCSE and now hate them.

Good luck, I'm sure everything will work out for you!!
Shouldn't I take Maths just to keep my options open. Almost all of the things that I might want to do at Uni require it and im not sure whether it would be a critical mistake to leave it out now. The other subjects don't really give me many degrees I can apply for.
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sophssmith_
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(Original post by AnonymousLobster)
Shouldn't I take Maths just to keep my options open. Almost all of the things that I might want to do at Uni require it and im not sure whether it would be a critical mistake to leave it out now. The other subjects don't really give me many degrees I can apply for.
If you're sure about your degree, then definitely! You put in what you get out, so if you think you are going to persevere with maths, then do it. My experiences may not relate directly to yours, as I don't know what you were going to do in uni or anything to further help so it is just general advice and not specific to your situation. But if you already know maths is requirement, and you want to do that degree, then you would have to choose it for the purpose of the degree.
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Muttley79
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(Original post by AnonymousLobster)
Shouldn't I take Maths just to keep my options open. Almost all of the things that I might want to do at Uni require it and im not sure whether it would be a critical mistake to leave it out now. The other subjects don't really give me many degrees I can apply for.
What does your Maths teacher think? I can usually predict who will be OK ...

A levels suit your career ideas better than IB
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marvelm
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a levels has a lot of memorisation for every subject tbh. its easier to memorise when you understand the content though but theres no escaping it. formulae/equations/research studies/case studies for example have to be memorised essentially.
plus from someone who did maths and didnt like it nor was very good at it and i got a 7 at gcse, dont do it unless you can really force yourself to practice and revise A LOT. my exams got cancelled but i somehow pulled a B after getting Ds and Cs a lot and starting to actually practice questions. maths is just constant question practice.
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AnonymousLobster
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(Original post by Muttley79)
What does your Maths teacher think? I can usually predict who will be OK ...

A levels suit your career ideas better than IB
Sadly this year I have a new maths teacher who is also new to the school so they know very little about me as of now. I've also been doing some more research and at least one of the IB sixth forms I should be able to take a further maths qualification that should put me on the same level as double maths students. Higher Level maths apparently covers most of the Double Maths content.

(Original post by marvelm)
a levels has a lot of memorisation for every subject tbh. its easier to memorise when you understand the content though but theres no escaping it. formulae/equations/research studies/case studies for example have to be memorised essentially.
plus from someone who did maths and didnt like it nor was very good at it and i got a 7 at gcse, dont do it unless you can really force yourself to practice and revise A LOT. my exams got cancelled but i somehow pulled a B after getting Ds and Cs a lot and starting to actually practice questions. maths is just constant question practice.
Ahk that's good to know. I've heard that IB is less memorisation based and for example Physics is a lot more about applying knowledge in unexpected scenarios rather than regurgitation. Also, there is some coursework for every single subject.
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