Neilos
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Decided to upgrade my ancient and beloved 5:4 19" monitor for one that I can have two windows side-by-side on... decided a 24" 16:9 would do.

Won't be using it for gaming or watching TV, so looking at basic ones around £100. Found these three on Amazon:

Dell
HP
Samsung

And at the top end of my price range, another HP.

I don't know if there is such a thing as a 'monitor expert', but if there is... I'm only really bothered about build quality and long-term reliability, and how nice a bog standard webpage, video or word document would look on them. Are any of them better than the others, or are they much the same?
0
reply
username5383500
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Honestly at this price point you're best off just looking at reviews for anything that's notably an issue. You won't be getting any bells and whistles, you're unlikely to even get basic features like height adjustment, and as a result there's basically nothing to compare between them. For basic tasks, they're all going to offer a more or less identical experience. Reviews might indicate that one model is slightly brighter than the others for example, but that's something we'd be Googling for ourselves just like you would.

With that in mind, you could reasonably just choose whichever one looks nicest to you, and not worry about if you made the right choice. I would avoid the Samsung though, that glossy black plastic looks like it'd be a dust magnet. Same for the cheaper HP. The Dell at least has some matte black plastic and silver in the stand, while the more expensive HP looks the most appealing.

NGL though, I'd be inclined to spend just a little more. Having a height adjustable monitor makes a world of difference, ensuring the monitor is in a suitable position. Something like this Dell monitor for example would be a justifiable jump in price, although it's certainly not the only option. But in the age of "working from home" and "remote learning" I'd strongly consider the health impact of having a monitor that you can adjust to the right height. It's not like you can't make the other monitors higher by chucking stuff underneath, but £50 is a small price to pay for preserving your neck.
1
reply
tinygirl96
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
Do some research online. Make brief notes. Then armed with a pen and a short list of questions, go to a local computer shop next week and take a look around. Talk to the staff as well. Get their expert advice and opinion. Check reviews in case. Work out what you can afford. Discuss options.
1
reply
Neilos
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by AcseI)
Honestly at this price point you're best off just looking at reviews for anything that's notably an issue. You won't be getting any bells and whistles, you're unlikely to even get basic features like height adjustment, and as a result there's basically nothing to compare between them. For basic tasks, they're all going to offer a more or less identical experience. Reviews might indicate that one model is slightly brighter than the others for example, but that's something we'd be Googling for ourselves just like you would.

With that in mind, you could reasonably just choose whichever one looks nicest to you, and not worry about if you made the right choice. I would avoid the Samsung though, that glossy black plastic looks like it'd be a dust magnet. Same for the cheaper HP. The Dell at least has some matte black plastic and silver in the stand, while the more expensive HP looks the most appealing.

NGL though, I'd be inclined to spend just a little more. Having a height adjustable monitor makes a world of difference, ensuring the monitor is in a suitable position. Something like this Dell monitor for example would be a justifiable jump in price, although it's certainly not the only option. But in the age of "working from home" and "remote learning" I'd strongly consider the health impact of having a monitor that you can adjust to the right height. It's not like you can't make the other monitors higher by chucking stuff underneath, but £50 is a small price to pay for preserving your neck.
Thanks for taking the time to give a great reply.

Hadn't really thought about adjustable but as I'm going to be using it a lot, I think I'll probably follow your advice and go up a step - either the Dell you suggested or one similar. Does make sense, and having the extra desk space (instead of a large textbook under the monitor) would be useful. Thanks again!
0
reply
username5383500
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
(Original post by Neilos)
Thanks for taking the time to give a great reply.

Hadn't really thought about adjustable but as I'm going to be using it a lot, I think I'll probably follow your advice and go up a step - either the Dell you suggested or one similar. Does make sense, and having the extra desk space (instead of a large textbook under the monitor) would be useful. Thanks again!
I'll also add that assuming you get something VESA compatible (which is basically most monitors when you start looking at adjustable stands) you can also replace the stand with a VESA arm that attaches to the desk. Obviously then we're talking about spending more than necessary, but if space is an issue it can be a good way to just remove the stand altogether.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (609)
33.8%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (754)
41.84%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (359)
19.92%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (80)
4.44%

Watched Threads

View All