Anonymous #1
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Kw Changes with temperature

At 60° Kw= 9.31x10^-14
At 10° Kw = 2.93 x10^-15

Calculate the pH of water at 60° and 10°

How can I do this question?
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tbi_zlx
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Kw Changes with temperature

At 60° Kw= 9.31x10^-14
At 10° Kw = 2.93 x10^-15

Calculate the pH of water at 60° and 10°

How can I do this question?
Pm cos im not able to help fully with working out on thread
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tinkletonk
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Kw Changes with temperature

At 60° Kw= 9.31x10^-14
At 10° Kw = 2.93 x10^-15

Calculate the pH of water at 60° and 10°

How can I do this question?
Kw = [H+][OH-]

But you can assume that [H+]=[OH-] because H2O fully dissociates into H+ and OH- ions

As [H+]=[OH-], [H+][OH-] can be written as [H+]^2

Therefore Kw = [H+]^2

Square root Kw to get [H+], then use -log[H+] to find the pH

At 60°C, the pH is -log(√9.31x10^-14) = 6.52

At 10°C, the pH is -log(√2.93 x10^-15) = 7.27

Hope that helps!
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