I want to drop out but I'm not sure if I should

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Anonymous #1
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I'm in my second year of a Computer Science with a Foundation Year course (i've done foundation year and first year) and am turning 22 soon.I didnt physically attend uni at all in my first two years so I have 0 friends there. I am currently super depressed and lonely and anxious and really want to drop out of my course since i hate it with a passion and am behind (i didnt do much last year either). I feel like there is no hope for me if I drop out as I don't know what i'd do other than a very risky sports endeavour as I really don't want to start another course at my age and would definitely rather work.

Is it better to suffer incredibly for two more years or drop out for my mental health? I realise this is not a question that you guys can answer for me but I would really appreciate any advice.
Thank you <3
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pericardium
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It absolutely is most important to prioritise your mental health, so undoubtedly put that first. There may be options for you that don’t involve dropping out, though.

Degree-level study is incredibly hard, that is no secret. It is not uncommon to feel overwhelmed by the workload. I am sorry that you feel lonely and as though you don’t really know many people there. This is easy to rectify, and while it may seem like an impossibly daunting task right now, once you’re there in person it gets easier. Obviously Covid doesn’t help matters.

If your university have a student wellbeing team, I’d strongly suggest speaking to them about this. They will be well equipped for situations just like these.

Hang in there. It might be stormy now, but it can’t rain forever.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by pericardium)
It absolutely is most important to prioritise your mental health, so undoubtedly put that first. There may be options for you that don’t involve dropping out, though.

Degree-level study is incredibly hard, that is no secret. It is not uncommon to feel overwhelmed by the workload. I am sorry that you feel lonely and as though you don’t really know many people there. This is easy to rectify, and while it may seem like an impossibly daunting task right now, once you’re there in person it gets easier. Obviously Covid doesn’t help matters.

If your university have a student wellbeing team, I’d strongly suggest speaking to them about this. They will be well equipped for situations just like these.

Hang in there. It might be stormy now, but it can’t rain forever.
Yeah, I actually had an expectation of going to uni and meeting a lot of people this year but covid absolutely destroyed that and I feel awful about it. I am currently living at home away from uni and studying from here. It sucks.
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Anonymous #1
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Report Thread starter 1 month ago
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(Original post by pericardium)
It absolutely is most important to prioritise your mental health, so undoubtedly put that first. There may be options for you that don’t involve dropping out, though.

Degree-level study is incredibly hard, that is no secret. It is not uncommon to feel overwhelmed by the workload. I am sorry that you feel lonely and as though you don’t really know many people there. This is easy to rectify, and while it may seem like an impossibly daunting task right now, once you’re there in person it gets easier. Obviously Covid doesn’t help matters.

If your university have a student wellbeing team, I’d strongly suggest speaking to them about this. They will be well equipped for situations just like these.

Hang in there. It might be stormy now, but it can’t rain forever.
I forgot to thank you for your kind words in my previous reply. Thank you so much for understanding <3
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Realitysreflexx
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I forgot to thank you for your kind words in my previous reply. Thank you so much for understanding <3
The issue is, you've burned through quite a bit of your student finance....changing courses would mean self finding... working in the British economy without some sort of degree, would likely be painful.

Have you tried to get support from your uni, parents orr friend's? Not having friends at uni during a pandemic isn't shocking. I would tough it out, hope for a vaccine...and you'll have two more good years left to make friends.

Best of luck.
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UniversityOfSunderland
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I'm in my second year of a Computer Science with a Foundation Year course (i've done foundation year and first year) and am turning 22 soon.I didnt physically attend uni at all in my first two years so I have 0 friends there. I am currently super depressed and lonely and anxious and really want to drop out of my course since i hate it with a passion and am behind (i didnt do much last year either). I feel like there is no hope for me if I drop out as I don't know what i'd do other than a very risky sports endeavour as I really don't want to start another course at my age and would definitely rather work.

Is it better to suffer incredibly for two more years or drop out for my mental health? I realise this is not a question that you guys can answer for me but I would really appreciate any advice.
Thank you <3
Mental Health absolutely comes first and it's therefore important that you reach out to your Wellbeing team for support. These health professionals will be able to work with you and offer an accessible service that can help manage your feelings which may even improve your feelings towards your course/place at university. Sometimes, even talking can help, and that is what they are there for. The current circumstances also won't be helping which is more than understandable, but there is light at the end of the tunnel.
Suffering in silence is not the answer and with regards to being behind on your course, it's also important that you speak to your tutor, they are there to support you and help you manage your workload.
There are also many ways you can meet new people and make friends, you never know once you feel like you have some relationships formed and have a hold of your course work, you may change your mind entirely.
Definitely utilise all the services available to you before making any permanent decisions, your university is there for you.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by UniversityOfSunderland)
Mental Health absolutely comes first and it's therefore important that you reach out to your Wellbeing team for support. These health professionals will be able to work with you and offer an accessible service that can help manage your feelings which may even improve your feelings towards your course/place at university. Sometimes, even talking can help, and that is what they are there for. The current circumstances also won't be helping which is more than understandable, but there is light at the end of the tunnel.
Suffering in silence is not the answer and with regards to being behind on your course, it's also important that you speak to your tutor, they are there to support you and help you manage your workload.
There are also many ways you can meet new people and make friends, you never know once you feel like you have some relationships formed and have a hold of your course work, you may change your mind entirely.
Definitely utilise all the services available to you before making any permanent decisions, your university is there for you.
Thank you so much. This gave me hope and I truly appreciate it! <3
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pericardium
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I hope things are going okay for you
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