Ileenileen
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Hii,


I was wondering, would I be able to get 9s in Biology and Chemistry without making notes at all but instead make only flashcards on anki/quizlet? (Alongside doing pastpapers and questions). I really want to save as much time as possible in revision but at the same time want good grades.
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Yazomi
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I think that’s possible. Different people have different revision methods that works best for them. If revision cards show that you can remember the content better through practise questions then it should be fine
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isobeln
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(Original post by Ileenileen)
Hii,


I was wondering, would I be able to get 9s in Biology and Chemistry without making notes at all but instead make only flashcards on anki/quizlet? (Alongside doing pastpapers and questions). I really want to save as much time as possible in revision but at the same time want good grades.
i'd say you don't need to make your own notes (physics and maths tutor has great ready made notes for every exam board) but I would make sure your flashcards cover all the points on the specification. pmt also has loads of practice questions separated into topics, so if while doing flashcards you find you're weaker on particular areas, e.g. cell structure, you can do loads of questions just on those. i hope this helps!
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username5383500
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(Original post by Ileenileen)
I was wondering, would I be able to get 9s in Biology and Chemistry without making notes at all but instead make only flashcards on anki/quizlet? (Alongside doing pastpapers and questions). I really want to save as much time as possible in revision but at the same time want good grades.
If you don't have any notes, what will you refer to in order to ensure you haven't missed anything?

The general question of "can I get X grade in Y subject by only doing Z" is impossible to answer. It depends on many factors, including whether the method works for you, whether you cover everything, whether you actually do well in the exams, and so on. We also can't predict the future, and even if someone else has been successful that's no indication you will be successful. The best measure will be when you start doing mocks and past papers. If your method works, you should be getting top grades. If you're not, that's a good sign maybe your method is not sufficient. If you're just using flashcards, and not even using past papers for revision, odds are it isn't going to be sufficient.

From a more general perspective, there are no shortcuts. You can absolutely try to save time, but it's unlikely you'll get good grades without also putting the effort in. There's no magic formula, if you put the right kind and amount of effort in, you'll get the results. Initially writing up your notes should not really take up a substantial amount of time, if it is you may be writing too much in your notes. In the long run, consider how much time you save by not writing notes, vs the impact that will have. You don't have to write notes, but consider the impact of putting in a few hours to do so, vs not having an easy "all in one" guide to your subject for future reference.

IMO, when we're talking about top grades notes are incredibly beneficial. They act as a sort of checklist for everything you should know, which gives you a chance to identify what you're missing. If you're writing notes and find you don't know something, or even worse something is outright missing from your notes, catching that and doing something about it is imperative to getting top grades. You may or may not be able to do that with other methods. I personally wouldn't be able to look at a set of flashcards and confidently say "yes, they cover all the material I could possibly need".
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username4793362
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You can get all 9’s with just flashcards. All the posts above are just waffle
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username4793362
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Scientifically proven, flashcards are the best revision

tool. Everything else is irrelevant & a waste of time.
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username5383500
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(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
You can get all 9’s with just flashcards. All the posts above are just waffle
(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
Scientifically proven, flashcards are the best revision

tool. Everything else is irrelevant & a waste of time.
Absolute rubbish. Gather 100 students, tell them all to revise with nothing but flashcards. They won't all magically get top grades.

If you're going to claim that something is scientifically proven, you should back it up with actual evidence. However it's important to remember that even if one revision method is suggested to be better, it won't be perfect for everyone. If 65% of students do better with flashcards for example then great. What about the other 35% though? Students learn in different ways, and flashcards are not suitable for everyone.

Not to mention doing past papers would fall under your category of "everything else being a waste of time". Please don't give misleading advice, especially on important matters such as revision.
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username4793362
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https://www.gwern.net/docs/spacedrep...39-spitzer.pdf

As I’ve said, all the posts are irrelevant. Do active recall/flashcards I barely make notes.
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username4793362
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Scientific research & evidence from 2010

. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b62...2edb9c80f2.pdf
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username4793362
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(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
https://www.gwern.net/docs/spacedrep...39-spitzer.pdf

As I’ve said, all the posts are irrelevant. Do active recall/flashcards I barely make notes.
Scientific research from 1939.
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username5383500
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(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
The posts above and the guy that said I’m talking rubbish has little to 0 IQ, and has no idea what’s he talking about
When you feel the need to insult someone to support your argument, your argument doesn't get stronger
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username5383500
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(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
""
As opposed to what? Randomly making claims, and then when someone calls you out you go Google a bunch of papers?
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username5383500
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(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
Papers? These are scientifically proven and accredited studies. They are documented for individuals like you
(Original post by Tracheostenosis)
So go have a read, since you had time to write a whole paragraph of waffle
If you actually want to debate specific points I made, you are welcome to do that. I'm not going to go and invent your argument for you though. If you don't actually want to debate properly then stop trying to turn this into ad hominem. At this point you're just spamming the thread and not adding anything of value.

If you think you can complete your GCSEs by just using flashcards then go right ahead. You might have great success. You might even have success at A Level and degree level. However plenty of people find that flashcards aren't a suitable method for them. Plenty of people do perfectly well without using flashcards. I've personally gotten top grades throughout GCSEs, A Levels and my degree without using flashcards. I've known people do equally well without them, and I've known people who love using flashcards.


There's no right answer here, and to suggest otherwise is naive. What works for one person is not guaranteed to work for everyone else. Because if that were the case, we'd have no need to ever teach any other methods. Rather than blindly suggesting one method, OP should find out what works best for them. They can certainly use "methods that are generally seen to be effective" as a starting point but in any way suggesting that X method will absolutely work is misleading.
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Ileenileen
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Wow, thank you for all of the replies! I will take all comments into consideration and try finding the method that suits me most!
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username5383500
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(Original post by Ileenileen)
Wow, thank you for all of the replies! I will take all comments into consideration and try finding the method that suits me most!
Good luck with your exams
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Ileenileen
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#16
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(Original post by AcseI)
If you don't have any notes, what will you refer to in order to ensure you haven't missed anything?

The general question of "can I get X grade in Y subject by only doing Z" is impossible to answer. It depends on many factors, including whether the method works for you, whether you cover everything, whether you actually do well in the exams, and so on. We also can't predict the future, and even if someone else has been successful that's no indication you will be successful. The best measure will be when you start doing mocks and past papers. If your method works, you should be getting top grades. If you're not, that's a good sign maybe your method is not sufficient. If you're just using flashcards, and not even using past papers for revision, odds are it isn't going to be sufficient.

From a more general perspective, there are no shortcuts. You can absolutely try to save time, but it's unlikely you'll get good grades without also putting the effort in. There's no magic formula, if you put the right kind and amount of effort in, you'll get the results. Initially writing up your notes should not really take up a substantial amount of time, if it is you may be writing too much in your notes. In the long run, consider how much time you save by not writing notes, vs the impact that will have. You don't have to write notes, but consider the impact of putting in a few hours to do so, vs not having an easy "all in one" guide to your subject for future reference.

IMO, when we're talking about top grades notes are incredibly beneficial. They act as a sort of checklist for everything you should know, which gives you a chance to identify what you're missing. If you're writing notes and find you don't know something, or even worse something is outright missing from your notes, catching that and doing something about it is imperative to getting top grades. You may or may not be able to do that with other methods. I personally wouldn't be able to look at a set of flashcards and confidently say "yes, they cover all the material I could possibly need".
Thank you a lot for your opinion! However, I have seen pretty good premade notes like the ones pmt land save my exams, so do you think it be more inefficient to use those as opposed to writing my own?
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username5383500
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(Original post by Ileenileen)
Thank you a lot for your opinion! However, I have seen pretty good premade notes like the ones pmt land save my exams, so do you think it be more inefficient to use those as opposed to writing my own?
Depends what angle you look at efficiency from. If you're looking at it from a "how much time I have to invest making notes" perspective, then obviously using premade notes saves you a lot of time. It's efficient in that sense.

However, there's quite a few benefits to creating your own notes. They'll be in a format more suitable for you. You can pay extra attention to areas you personally need to focus on. Writing your own notes is itself a form of revision, and will use more of your brain than simply reading some premade notes. And so on.

I'd say it's absolutely fine to use other notes as a reference, but it's going to be more beneficial for you to create your own notes. They're supposed to be your notes to help you after all, and you can personalise them however you wish. You could of course start with someone else's notes and highlight or add to them, but at that point you might as well start from scratch and write your own. There is of course also a risk that premade notes are wrong, whereas at least what you get from the textbook is direct from source. But really this is going to come down to how much value you personally get out of writing the notes. Personally, writing my notes was often sufficient to remember something but that's not the case for everyone. You may in fact do much better by using someone else's notes as a base, and making changes to suit you. Maybe that's how you learn, and we can't really tell you one way or the other there. Do whatever you feel most helps you.
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Ileenileen
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(Original post by AcseI)
Depends what angle you look at efficiency from. If you're looking at it from a "how much time I have to invest making notes" perspective, then obviously using premade notes saves you a lot of time. It's efficient in that sense.

However, there's quite a few benefits to creating your own notes. They'll be in a format more suitable for you. You can pay extra attention to areas you personally need to focus on. Writing your own notes is itself a form of revision, and will use more of your brain than simply reading some premade notes. And so on.

I'd say it's absolutely fine to use other notes as a reference, but it's going to be more beneficial for you to create your own notes. They're supposed to be your notes to help you after all, and you can personalise them however you wish. You could of course start with someone else's notes and highlight or add to them, but at that point you might as well start from scratch and write your own. There is of course also a risk that premade notes are wrong, whereas at least what you get from the textbook is direct from source. But really this is going to come down to how much value you personally get out of writing the notes. Personally, writing my notes was often sufficient to remember something but that's not the case for everyone. You may in fact do much better by using someone else's notes as a base, and making changes to suit you. Maybe that's how you learn, and we can't really tell you one way or the other there. Do whatever you feel most helps you.
Thank you so muchh!!!
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Blue_skies124
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To be honest, notes are a waste of time in my opinion. Repeatedly write out what you’re learning until you can write it out on a flash card without referring to anything and then do exam questions. Active recall and therefore doing exam questions and flash cards or blurting is way better than just making notes.
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Ileenileen
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(Original post by Blue_skies124)
To be honest, notes are a waste of time in my opinion. Repeatedly write out what you’re learning until you can write it out on a flash card without referring to anything and then do exam questions. Active recall and therefore doing exam questions and flash cards or blurting is way better than just making notes.
Thank you! For exam questions, do you think I should do them as I go along learning the content or would it be okay to do them mainly during exam season , as in 1-2 months before exams?
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