stud£nt
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I really want to learn French fluently. I did a bit during secondary but i can't remember that much and I just do not know how or where to start in trying to teach my self it at home, any tips?
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blingbling123
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(Original post by stud£nt)
I really want to learn French fluently. I did a bit during secondary but i can't remember that much and I just do not know how or where to start in trying to teach my self it at home, any tips?
Use the Duolingo app. It's super easy and you actually learn the language, pronunciation, grammar and you actually retain it!
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Interea
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(Original post by stud£nt)
I really want to learn French fluently. I did a bit during secondary but i can't remember that much and I just do not know how or where to start in trying to teach my self it at home, any tips?
French is one of the few languages that Duolingo is actually pretty decent for as a standalone, they also have the Duolingo French podcast to help with your listening.

Once you get reasonably far in, you could maybe buy one of your favourite books in French and work you way through it - I find that great for keeping engaged and picking up vocab in reasonable natural use. Also, look into French YouTubers: the pace of speech will likely be too fast at first, but as you progress it'll get easier to understand, and you can pick YouTubers based on your interests to help engage you!
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leopard202
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Hey!

An app alongside your own research is the best way. Duolingo is good to do regularly to test your knowledge. You’ll just need to look up certain ‘rules’ in French for present and past tense etc. Because the apps don’t always tell you the rules on a visual table or something easy to remember.

I’m learning Korean this way- as well as practising writing the words. I write down new vocabulary and example sentences from the app, then google some extra information to understand why they’re written like this.

It’s been 2 months and it’s going pretty well to be honest.

^ if you can’t pay for lessons
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Kogomogo
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I recommend anki (I use ankidroid the phone app so i can do it in the odd 5 minutes here and there), it's essentially flashcards but uses spaced repetition for remembering stuff better. Google for some recommendations for good vocab lists or make a deck yourself of words as you come across them. I'm trying to self learn German right now and for context the amount of words at beginner level is about 500-1000, intermediate is around 2000-4000 and advanced is around 8000-16000.

Once you have a good chunk of words and a few of the more common phrases memorised try reading articles and simple books looking up words as you go, or watch tv in French with subtitles. See if there is a discord app too where you can practice with others and get feedback (some have native speakers helping out) .
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stud£nt
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(Original post by Interea)
French is one of the few languages that Duolingo is actually pretty decent for as a standalone, they also have the Duolingo French podcast to help with your listening.

Once you get reasonably far in, you could maybe buy one of your favourite books in French and work you way through it - I find that great for keeping engaged and picking up vocab in reasonable natural use. Also, look into French YouTubers: the pace of speech will likely be too fast at first, but as you progress it'll get easier to understand, and you can pick YouTubers based on your interests to help engage you!
Thank you, I think once i've learnt a bit more ill start watching french youtube, that such a great idea!
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stud£nt
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(Original post by Kogomogo)
I recommend anki (I use ankidroid the phone app so i can do it in the odd 5 minutes here and there), it's essentially flashcards but uses spaced repetition for remembering stuff better. Google for some recommendations for good vocab lists or make a deck yourself of words as you come across them. I'm trying to self learn German right now and for context the amount of words at beginner level is about 500-1000, intermediate is around 2000-4000 and advanced is around 8000-16000.

Once you have a good chunk of words and a few of the more common phrases memorised try reading articles and simple books looking up words as you go, or watch tv in French with subtitles. See if there is a discord app too where you can practice with others and get feedback (some have native speakers helping out) .
That's great i'll check it out. Anki is ideal for on the go!
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stud£nt
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(Original post by leopard202)
Hey!

An app alongside your own research is the best way. Duolingo is good to do regularly to test your knowledge. You’ll just need to look up certain ‘rules’ in French for present and past tense etc. Because the apps don’t always tell you the rules on a visual table or something easy to remember.

I’m learning Korean this way- as well as practising writing the words. I write down new vocabulary and example sentences from the app, then google some extra information to understand why they’re written like this.

It’s been 2 months and it’s going pretty well to be honest.

^ if you can’t pay for lessons
Thank you so much, ill keep that in mind!
Well done by the way!
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redmeercat
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Heya! Doing a French/ German degree and learning Russian on my own atm!

Whilst apps like Duolingo and anki are good, they will never teach you a language in their own. As a way to start, fiar enough, but you'll also want to be learning in other ways, such as practicing your conversation with the HelloTalk app, refining your grammatical understanding with a textbook / the internet (lawless French is a good website, and French Grammar in Context is a good textbook!) As well as reading (try the news or the teach yourself A2-B1 books once you get to a high enough level) and listening to podcasts and music so that you get used to the language, even if you don't understand a lot of words! Using the language is the main thing. Also, remember that it's better to do 15 mins 6 times per week than 3 hours once per week, as otherwise you'll just forget everything you've learnt
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stud£nt
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(Original post by redmeercat)
Heya! Doing a French/ German degree and learning Russian on my own atm!

Whilst apps like Duolingo and anki are good, they will never teach you a language in their own. As a way to start, fiar enough, but you'll also want to be learning in other ways, such as practicing your conversation with the HelloTalk app, refining your grammatical understanding with a textbook / the internet (lawless French is a good website, and French Grammar in Context is a good textbook!) As well as reading (try the news or the teach yourself A2-B1 books once you get to a high enough level) and listening to podcasts and music so that you get used to the language, even if you don't understand a lot of words! Using the language is the main thing. Also, remember that it's better to do 15 mins 6 times per week than 3 hours once per week, as otherwise you'll just forget everything you've learnt
Wow that's so impressive, well done! Are you learning Russian from scratch?
Once I am more confident I will definitely look at using the Hello Talk app as my main goal is to be able to speak it fluently. Is the app safe?
Doing 15 mins a day seems so much more manageable and is ideal as I am still in college.
Thank you
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redmeercat
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(Original post by stud£nt)
Wow that's so impressive, well done! Are you learning Russian from scratch?
Once I am more confident I will definitely look at using the Hello Talk app as my main goal is to be able to speak it fluently. Is the app safe?
Doing 15 mins a day seems so much more manageable and is ideal as I am still in college.
Thank you
I am doing Russian Fri scratch, been doing it for 7-8 months now, and it's a great language, even if it's difficult! But with French you won't have to worry about cases, which is always nice, so I'd suggest that every week you learn a new piece of grammar, find a new french song that you like enough to have on your playlist, write a paragraph (starting at maybe 25 words and then increasing as you get better!) And then have the other sessions free to work on whoever elements of grammar and conversation you like! Remember, practice makes perfect even more than drilling grammar 24/7 does!
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hootdoot04
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whats your reasoning behind learning French?
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