noname900
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I applied for maths and I wrote about one of my endeavors in maths. I wrote that centroids of solid revolutions would allow me to mathematically prove that the centre of gravity for all spheres is at its centre. I was rereading my personal statement and I thought that it really wasn't too accurate to say all spheres as that would only apply for uniformly dense spheres. I've been freaking about that. Keep it in mind, I applied to Oxford with this. Should I be worried? What should I do? I can't imagine this not sticking out like a sore thumb for any mathematician over there. Could anyone shed some light on this?

The rest of the personal statement is really good in my honest opinion, but this has me wide awake
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jm4761
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I can't comment on the accuracy of your statement since I have no idea what you're on about unfortunately! I'd have to google what a centroid was. You'll probably find that at this level, they won't even bother to read the PS. If you've got the predicted grades, you're likely to get an interview, where they ask you lots of questions that typically have nothing to do with your PS. I wouldn't do anything now other than try your best to forget about it. Attempting to correct it is only going to draw attention to something that in all likelihood would otherwise have been ignored.
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noname900
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(Original post by jm4761)
I can't comment on the accuracy of your statement since I have no idea what you're on about unfortunately! I'd have to google what a centroid was. You'll probably find that at this level, they won't even bother to read the PS. If you've got the predicted grades, you're likely to get an interview, where they ask you lots of questions that typically have nothing to do with your PS. I wouldn't do anything now other than try your best to forget about it. Attempting to correct it is only going to draw attention to something that in all likelihood would otherwise have been ignored.
Yea! Thanks for the reply. I'm reading around and apparently, it's not even all too uncommon for tutors to not even read personal statements for STEM. It makes sense as some students may get a lot of help on it, which has no weight compared to admission tests and grades for the respective subjects. I think I will ignore it, definitely.
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jm4761
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(Original post by noname900)
Yea! Thanks for the reply. I'm reading around and apparently, it's not even all too uncommon for tutors to not even read personal statements for STEM. It makes sense as some students may get a lot of help on it, which has no weight compared to admission tests and grades for the respective subjects. I think I will ignore it, definitely.
Exactly, they're much more interested in hearing how you solve the funky maths problem they put in front of you - can't get any help on that when you're in the room! Good luck!
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noname900
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(Original post by jm4761)
Exactly, they're much more interested in hearing how you solve the funky maths problem they put in front of you - can't get any help on that when you're in the room! Good luck!
Thank you for your encouragement. It is very appreciated
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by noname900)
I applied for maths and I wrote about one of my endeavors in maths. I wrote that centroids of solid revolutions would allow me to mathematically prove that the centre of gravity for all spheres is at its centre. I was rereading my personal statement and I thought that it really wasn't too accurate to say all spheres as that would only apply for uniformly dense spheres. I've been freaking about that. Keep it in mind, I applied to Oxford with this. Should I be worried? What should I do? I can't imagine this not sticking out like a sore thumb for any mathematician over there. Could anyone shed some light on this?

The rest of the personal statement is really good in my honest opinion, but this has me wide awake
Your MAT result is the only thing that you should worry about

The worst that I would expect is that they ask about it at interview, but I seriously doubt that they would - they have far more interesting things to spend the time on. Good luck.
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0le
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In my view they won't care. But in general, it is good that you are thinking about the assumptions and scope of your problems, something which is often missed.
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15Characters...
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(Original post by noname900)
I applied for maths and I wrote about one of my endeavors in maths. I wrote that centroids of solid revolutions would allow me to mathematically prove that the centre of gravity for all spheres is at its centre. I was rereading my personal statement and I thought that it really wasn't too accurate to say all spheres as that would only apply for uniformly dense spheres. I've been freaking about that. Keep it in mind, I applied to Oxford with this. Should I be worried? What should I do? I can't imagine this not sticking out like a sore thumb for any mathematician over there. Could anyone shed some light on this?

The rest of the personal statement is really good in my honest opinion, but this has me wide awake
I think the conventional wisdom is that personal statements are less important for maths than for some other subjects, grades and MAT (and of course interviews) are more important. Very unlikely that this alone will effect whether or not you are invited to interview and whether they subsequently make you an offer. Definitely not worth losing sleep over!

For what it's worth, in my opinion I doubt they will flag it as a mistake. Whoever reads it will probably either fail to notice the assumption of uniform density at all, or just think that you were implicitly making that assumption.
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noname900
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(Original post by 15Characters...)
I think the conventional wisdom is that personal statements are less important for maths than for some other subjects, grades and MAT (and of course interviews) are more important. Very unlikely that this alone will effect whether or not you are invited to interview and whether they subsequently make you an offer. Definitely not worth losing sleep over!

For what it's worth, in my opinion I doubt they will flag it as a mistake. Whoever reads it will probably either fail to notice the assumption of uniform density at all, or just think that you were implicitly making that assumption.
Yea, it was very easy to gloss over it initially as I had made that assumption. However, after a week, it just doesn't feel right and its difference of a few words. But yes, not worth losing sleep over. I just hope the other universities don't mind it too much. Luckily, 4/5 of my choices look at MAT. I guess I just focus on MAT and further maths now
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