sara.f05
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would it be right to assume that this is a 3,4,5 triangle or is there a more logical approach?Name:  Capture3.PNG
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by sara.f05)
would it be right to assume that this is a 3,4,5 triangle or is there a more logical approach?Name:  Capture3.PNG
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Pythagoras. You'll need two right-angled triangles - can you see where?
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sara.f05
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Pythagoras. You'll need two right-angled triangles - can you see where?
yes, i tried using pythagoras with lengths 5 squared - 3.5 squared but i had an incorrect answer. this is a non-calculator paper
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(Original post by sara.f05)
yes, i tired using pythagoras with lengths 5 squared - 3.5 squared but i had an incorrect answer. this is a non-calculator paper
Hint: The perpendicular distance from the centre to the top and bottom horizontal lines isn't the same.

You don't need a calculator. I did it without writing or drawing anything.
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sara.f05
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Hint: The perpendicular distance from the centre to the top and bottom horizontal lines isn't the same.

You don't need a calculator. I did it without writing or drawing anything.
still a bit confused :confused:

update: i did 5 squared - 4 squared and got the correct answer, just not sure where the 4 came from as the top line and bottom line are not the same in length.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by sara.f05)
still a bit confused :confused:

update: i did 5 squared - 4 squared and got the correct answer, just not sure where the 4 came from as the top line and bottom line are not the same in length.
Draw a right-angled triangle with the centre, mid-point and one end of the top horizontal line. That's a 3, 4 (half the horizontal line's length), 5 (radius) triangle, so tells you that the centre is 3cm down from the top horizontal line. Therefore, it's 7-3=4cm up from the lower one. Now draw another right-angled triangle to calculate half the bottom horizontal line's length.
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sara.f05
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Draw a right-angled triangle with the centre, mid-point and one end of the top horizontal line. That's a 3, 4 (half the horizontal line's length), 5 (radius) triangle, so tells you that the centre is 3cm down from the top horizontal line. Therefore, it's 7-3=4cm up from the lower one. Now draw another right-angled triangle to calculate half the bottom horizontal line's length.
thank you! i understand it now
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