Speed Limit on a Dual Carraige Way?

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lBackSeatDriverl
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97SO8ygV1ME

Am i understanding this guy correctly? on 1 min and 13 seconds. I think his saying the speed you should do on a dual carriageway if there are no speed signs is the speed you was doing on the previous road before you joined the dual carriageway. From googleing it appears there is no minimum spped limit on any road unless theirs a blue circular sign which is apparantly very very rare in the U.K.
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Admit-One
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Depends on the vehicle:

https://www.gov.uk/speed-limits
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Admit-One
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NB. I'm referring to the absolute maximum above.

The video is telling you to follow the signage regardless of whether it is a dual carriageway or not. Locally I drive on dual carriageways with 40 and 60mph limits. The fact that they are DC's doesn't dictate the limit, the signage does.
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Nadim Chowdhury
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(Original post by Admit-One)
NB. I'm referring to the absolute maximum above.

The video is telling you to follow the signage regardless of whether it is a dual carriageway or not. Locally I drive on dual carriageways with 40 and 60mph limits. The fact that they are DC's doesn't dictate the limit, the signage does.
There's a dual carriageway near me that has a speed limit of 30. Search the a13 dual carriageway in canning town, London. Seems ridiculously slow and no one really sticks to it anyways.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by lBackSeatDriverl)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97SO8ygV1ME

Am i understanding this guy correctly? on 1 min and 13 seconds. I think his saying the speed you should do on a dual carriageway if there are no speed signs is the speed you was doing on the previous road before you joined the dual carriageway. From googleing it appears there is no minimum spped limit on any road unless theirs a blue circular sign which is apparantly very very rare in the U.K.
The video is correct. However, if you were on a single carriageway national speed limit road, the speed limit increases to 70mph on sections with dual carriageways.

There is no minimum speed, but you may get done for driving without due care and attention if you go too slowly.
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Admit-One
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(Original post by Nadim Chowdhury)
There's a dual carriageway near me that has a speed limit of 30. Search the a13 dual carriageway in canning town, London. Seems ridiculously slow and no one really sticks to it anyways.
Yeah it does seem a bit daft sometimes. If it's an area I know where there are cameras, I use my speed limiter to make sure I don't get caught out. Easy to do if you're coming off a motorway.
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TheMcSame
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(Original post by Admit-One)
Yeah it does seem a bit daft sometimes. If it's an area I know where there are cameras, I use my speed limiter to make sure I don't get caught out. Easy to do if you're coming off a motorway.
Urgggh hate that. Doing so many miles at '70' then finding yourself doing 30, feeling like you're not moving at all.

(Original post by lBackSeatDriverl)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97SO8ygV1ME

Am i understanding this guy correctly? on 1 min and 13 seconds. I think his saying the speed you should do on a dual carriageway if there are no speed signs is the speed you was doing on the previous road before you joined the dual carriageway. From googleing it appears there is no minimum spped limit on any road unless theirs a blue circular sign which is apparantly very very rare in the U.K.
Yes, that's right. The speed limit that applies to the road will be the same displayed on the last sign you passed. The only time the speed limit changes while still under a previous sign is when the limit is national and it goes from dual to single carriageway (or vice versa). Not particularly aware of many roads where you come across that though, they tend to have posted limits below NSL. Though I do think the A5 around Cannock does have a few bits where it does that and stays under NSL.

I suspect other roads like the A38 and the A1 probably have sections like that somewhere. No idea for sure, but given their length, it's a good guess.
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TheDE
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The rule for this is that any dual carriageway is national speed limit unless either road signs tell you otherwise. If you enter a dual carriageway and there is no lighting and no speed repeater signs then it is NSL, (70). If the limit is below this then it must legally have repeaters for the speed limit every few hundred meters. If there are street lights and it is a built up area (driveways and pavements etc) such as a city or town then you should assume it is 30mph unless signposted otherwise
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lBackSeatDriverl
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(Original post by TheDE)
The rule for this is that any dual carriageway is national speed limit unless either road signs tell you otherwise. If you enter a dual carriageway and there is no lighting and no speed repeater signs then it is NSL, (70). If the limit is below this then it must legally have repeaters for the speed limit every few hundred meters. If there are street lights and it is a built up area (driveways and pavements etc) such as a city or town then you should assume it is 30mph unless signposted otherwise
thanks for your reply, i have another question now what is a speed repeater sign? is it just another sign repeated to remind you the speed limit?
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martin7
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(Original post by lBackSeatDriverl)
thanks for your reply, i have another question now what is a speed repeater sign? is it just another sign repeated to remind you the speed limit?
Repeater signs are the same as the signs at the start of the limit; they're just physically smaller. They are there to remind you of the speed limit if the default limit doesn't apply.
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lBackSeatDriverl
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(Original post by martin7)
Repeater signs are the same as the signs at the start of the limit; they're just physically smaller. They are there to remind you of the speed limit if the default limit doesn't apply.
thank you
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