Honest Opinion: International Students Job Aspect After MSc. Psych Conversion in UK

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NowhereMan.111
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Hey!!
Hope all is well at your end. I am planning to do MSc. Psychology Conversion. I'll be applying for the accredited BPS course in the UK. As an international student, I am more inclined to opt for universities which are offering accredited course rather than the prestige as most prestigious universities are having twice the tuition fee for international applicants.
I have seen and read a lot about the competitiveness attached to psychology as a career. Nevertheless, I would like to pursue it. It is one such stream where I don't feel any compulsion to involve myself.

As I understood, In order to become an independent clinical psychologist, I'll need to gain some work experience after graduation preferably as an assistant psychologist which in itself a very tough criterion to fulfil. But I am willing to opt for other jobs which will at least provide a ground to stand after graduation and to work my way through.

I would like to have your opinions about the viability of becoming a clinical psychologist for an international student and to practice in the UK. I came across the news that the UK Govt. have allowed two years of extended stay after completion of the degree to find a job in the UK. Considering the practical scenario, is it a futile attempt to even think to about opting for this course?
How much hard it is to land a job for an international student? I am asking this as I have read a few articles stating that the employers are unwilling to hire international students and prefer localities or EU citizens to avoid procedural aspects, etc.
I would like to know, with the MSc. Psych Conversion, will I at least find an entry level job and slowly make my way around?




























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madeofcolour
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Hi! Congratulations on doing your MSc Psych conversion! I'll try to answer as best as I can.

To get onto the clinical psychology doctorate, you require a minimum of 9 months of work experience after a BPS accredited degree in an entry-level role i.e. support worker, research assistant, assistant psychologist, psychological wellbeing practitioner, etc.
International applicants are only allowed to apply to the universities that offer self-funded places as the NHS does not cover tuition for non-UK applicants, bear this in mind if you didn't already know!

Job as an international applicant: I would say from personal experience (so far, one year as an assistant psychologist on a ward), we have had international students working as assistant psychologists or healthcare assistants with no issue - as long as you have good grades and you're knowledgable on the topic it's not difficult to get a job because of your status. It is difficult in general, but your nationality/residential status makes no difference to most places. This being said, not ALL places have this mindset and you should probably email in advance to any post you're applying to ask if it would be an issue.

In terms of finding a job: It is tough. Many people struggle to get a job straight out of university (also after masters) for months as there can be over 200 applicants per role in certain cases. I would probably start with a research assistant position if I were you, your masters will give you a great advantage in getting a role like that because of the postgraduate research aspect. If not, support worker or healthcare assistant roles at the Priory (private healthcare) are a great great way to start.

Let me know if you have any more questions! Hope this helped!
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by madeofcolour)
Hi! Congratulations on doing your MSc Psych conversion! I'll try to answer as best as I can.

To get onto the clinical psychology doctorate, you require a minimum of 9 months of work experience after a BPS accredited degree in an entry-level role i.e. support worker, research assistant, assistant psychologist, psychological wellbeing practitioner, etc.
International applicants are only allowed to apply to the universities that offer self-funded places as the NHS does not cover tuition for non-UK applicants, bear this in mind if you didn't already know!

Job as an international applicant: I would say from personal experience (so far, one year as an assistant psychologist on a ward), we have had international students working as assistant psychologists or healthcare assistants with no issue - as long as you have good grades and you're knowledgable on the topic it's not difficult to get a job because of your status. It is difficult in general, but your nationality/residential status makes no difference to most places. This being said, not ALL places have this mindset and you should probably email in advance to any post you're applying to ask if it would be an issue.

In terms of finding a job: It is tough. Many people struggle to get a job straight out of university (also after masters) for months as there can be over 200 applicants per role in certain cases. I would probably start with a research assistant position if I were you, your masters will give you a great advantage in getting a role like that because of the postgraduate research aspect. If not, support worker or healthcare assistant roles at the Priory (private healthcare) are a great great way to start.

Let me know if you have any more questions! Hope this helped!
Hey!! Thanks a lot for sharing your opinion. If possible can you clarify over the point, "International applicants are only allowed to apply to the universities that offer self-funded places as the NHS does not cover tuition for non-UK applicants." I am aware of the MSc. Psychology Conversion course-related financial concerns, but I was banking over some kind of financial help or backing while enrolling for PhD. As I'll be investing around 25000 Pounds over the Conversion course, any financial assistance for further education would be of great help. I don't want to be dependent upon my family after MSc.


Also, can I shed some light over the job prospects of roles like "support worker or healthcare assistant roles"? Are they equally competitive or tough to get into immediately after graduation? Will they be considered as relevant working experience for PhD applications?

Regards,
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Hey!!
Hope all is well at your end. I am planning to do MSc. Psychology Conversion. I'll be applying for the accredited BPS course in the UK. As an international student, I am more inclined to opt for universities which are offering accredited course rather than the prestige as most prestigious universities are having twice the tuition fee for international applicants.
I have seen and read a lot about the competitiveness attached to psychology as a career. Nevertheless, I would like to pursue it. It is one such stream where I don't feel any compulsion to involve myself.

As I understood, In order to become an independent clinical psychologist, I'll need to gain some work experience after graduation preferably as an assistant psychologist which in itself a very tough criterion to fulfil. But I am willing to opt for other jobs which will at least provide a ground to stand after graduation and to work my way through.

I would like to have your opinions about the viability of becoming a clinical psychologist for an international student and to practice in the UK. I came across the news that the UK Govt. have allowed two years of extended stay after completion of the degree to find a job in the UK. Considering the practical scenario, is it a futile attempt to even think to about opting for this course?
How much hard it is to land a job for an international student? I am asking this as I have read a few articles stating that the employers are unwilling to hire international students and prefer localities or EU citizens to avoid procedural aspects, etc.
I would like to know, with the MSc. Psych Conversion, will I at least find an entry level job and slowly make my way around?




























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I'd be much less optimistic than the previous poster. If you were coming in as a qualified and experienced psychologist, I suspect your chances of employment would be good, because demand is on the rise. However, Psychology is one of the most popular undergrad degrees to do in the uK and there is a vast oversupply of graduates, even in a rising market, looking for entry level opportunities.

You should certainly think of the academic strength of your conversion course, and that works out as 'prestige' in almost all cases. Certainly not in the list you gave in another thread. You also need to be very clear on what practical experience you need and whether you can realistically get that in the UK. I'd be surprised if healthcare assistant is enough - while it's a caring role, it's right at the bottom level, hardly much that serving tea and coffee, cleaning up etc - it would be evidence of the ability to work in a care environment, but not necessarily any relevance to psychology as a profession.
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Lord Asriel
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You might find this blog from an international student who did psychology to DClinPsy path:
http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/careers/2020...ional-student/
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
I'd be much less optimistic than the previous poster. If you were coming in as a qualified and experienced psychologist, I suspect your chances of employment would be good, because demand is on the rise. However, Psychology is one of the most popular undergrad degrees to do in the uK and there is a vast oversupply of graduates, even in a rising market, looking for entry level opportunities.

You should certainly think of the academic strength of your conversion course, and that works out as 'prestige' in almost all cases. Certainly not in the list you gave in another thread. You also need to be very clear on what practical experience you need and whether you can realistically get that in the UK. I'd be surprised if healthcare assistant is enough - while it's a caring role, it's right at the bottom level, hardly much that serving tea and coffee, cleaning up etc - it would be evidence of the ability to work in a care environment, but not necessarily any relevance to psychology as a profession.
Thanks for the reply. I appreciate your honest insight.
I believe you are right when you state the influx of undergrad students for entry-level opportunities. Considering the minimum gap of 15000 Pounds and not so great undergrad grades, my options for entering a college for prestige is slim. Although, I'll be giving my best in the respective course whichever college I choose or enter.
By your statement should I assume that it is highly improbable acc. to you that I would find an entry-level job, healthcare, support worker after graduation with good enough grade and accreditation?
This is the one and the only way where I could see myself in the future. I have lost interest in law way back when it all seemed so outwardly materialistic. A bit of optimism can help me through. I know, it'll be a hell of a ride but as long as I am able to set my foot, I am ready to be humble enough to start with any level of a job if that leads me to shed some light to the aim. If that leads me to financially support myself on a daily basis with minimal luxury, I'll make through.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
A bit of optimism can help me through. I know, it'll be a hell of a ride but as long as I am able to set my foot, I am ready to be humble enough to start with any level of a job if that leads me to shed some light to the aim. If that leads me to financially support myself on a daily basis with minimal luxury, I'll make through.
It's a fine sentiment, but not one that the Home Office will sympathise with. Chances are you will have to find yourself a full time job with an income of something over 20-25k, depending on the rules in force at the time you graduate. What if you can't do that? What if you can't get a job that is sufficient for progress as a psychologist? What will you do if you can't comply with your visa requirements and have to leave the UK? Is the conversion course going to be valid in your home country or anywhere else you can work?

Post Covid, it doesn't seem likely that the government will be making it easier for non-UK nationals to get jobs in the UK, especially if they aren't working in shortage areas.
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