laurensaweirdo
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I'm planning on taking a joint Art and Psychology degree at Reading which is a four year course. Teachers and videos on YouTube have recommended taking a Foundation year before going to university for Art which I have been looking at. The problem is that the foundation year would be at a different university and means I would also have to do five years of postgraduate. I'm wondering whether a foundation degree is recommended before a joint degree?
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Xarao
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The foundation path is usually for people who haven't attained the necessary grades to get into the actual course, so the foundation year is used as an entry to the main course.

If your grades are good enough and that's what you want to do, go straight into it (although Art as a degree makes no sense), but you do you.
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laurensaweirdo
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I have the right grades to get onto the course but for art related courses, apparently the foundation helps with portfolio and it's like a segue into art at university. I'm doing it at A-Level now but my teachers have all said the foundation is the traditional approach and helpful to get into undergraduate.

(Also, why does art as a degree not make sense?)

(Original post by Xarao)
The foundation path is usually for people who haven't attained the necessary grades to get into the actual course, so the foundation year is used as an entry to the main course.

If your grades are good enough and that's what you want to do, go straight into it (although Art as a degree makes no sense), but you do you.
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Xarao
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(Original post by laurensaweirdo)
I have the right grades to get onto the course but for art related courses, apparently the foundation helps with portfolio and it's like a segue into art at university. I'm doing it at A-Level now but my teachers have all said the foundation is the traditional approach and helpful to get into undergraduate.

(Also, why does art as a degree not make sense?)
It makes some sense, IF you have no sort of portfolio. Are you telling me that you don't have one?

Art is meant to be driven from your own creativity, not based on a set of guidelines created by your university, hence why it's seen as a joke.
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laurensaweirdo
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(Original post by Xarao)
It makes some sense, IF you have no sort of portfolio. Are you telling me that you don't have one?

Art is meant to be driven from your own creativity, not based on a set of guidelines created by your university, hence why it's seen as a joke.
Okay, thank you for the help! I'll look more into it and see if it's for me but otherwise just go straight into the degree with the portfolio I already have
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by Xarao)

Art is meant to be driven from your own creativity, not based on a set of guidelines created by your university, hence why it's seen as a joke.
This is more STEM nonsense. Art is full of rules. Those rules have to be learnt, even if you are going to rebuild them in unique ways, or bend or stretch them creatively in the future. There's a history to art, a sociology, a chemistry, an economics, a philosophy, a language. There is every reason to go to university to study art.

OP, first of all, why do a joint degree, you are only getting half of two very different subjects, you'll just end up with a weaker outcome on both. Do one of them as a single subject, then the other at Masters level.

I have heard the 'foundation year' thesis before, but never with any very convincing argument behind it. I don't believe a foundation year, unless perhaps at Art College will build a portfolio. Modern foundation degrees are based catching up the necessary academic standards to start Uni proper. You'd need to be VERY careful and sure you needed that foundation year in an artistic sense and that you'd get useful training, not just marking time.
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laurensaweirdo
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
This is more STEM nonsense. Art is full of rules. Those rules have to be learnt, even if you are going to rebuild them in unique ways, or bend or stretch them creatively in the future. There's a history to art, a sociology, a chemistry, an economics, a philosophy, a language. There is every reason to go to university to study art.

OP, first of all, why do a joint degree, you are only getting half of two very different subjects, you'll just end up with a weaker outcome on both. Do one of them as a single subject, then the other at Masters level.

I have heard the 'foundation year' thesis before, but never with any very convincing argument behind it. I don't believe a foundation year, unless perhaps at Art College will build a portfolio. Modern foundation degrees are based catching up the necessary academic standards to start Uni proper. You'd need to be VERY careful and sure you needed that foundation year in an artistic sense and that you'd get useful training, not just marking time.
Hi, thank you for all the information! I'm interested in doing a joint Art and Psychology degree so I can go into Art Psychotherapy. I would do just a single honours but I'm indecisive. I thought the joint honours would open more opportunities for a postgraduate but if that's not the case I'll maybe reconsider.

The postgraduate in Art Psychotherapy at Roehampton does only actually require an art based degree or strong background in art but I thought doing the joint honours would give me some extra knowledge in both fields so I can decide which one I want to take further (or both).

I've been told I can drop either subject in a joint honours which I think is a good option for me if I do end up being more drawn to one subject. I was originally interested in just an Art degree but, although art teachers agree with this, many other people seem to think it's not a serious degree as Xarao said earlier (mainly those interested in STEM as you said).
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by laurensaweirdo)
Hi, thank you for all the information! I'm interested in doing a joint Art and Psychology degree so I can go into Art Psychotherapy. I would do just a single honours but I'm indecisive. I thought the joint honours would open more opportunities for a postgraduate but if that's not the case I'll maybe reconsider.

The postgraduate in Art Psychotherapy at Roehampton does only actually require an art based degree or strong background in art but I thought doing the joint honours would give me some extra knowledge in both fields so I can decide which one I want to take further (or both).

I've been told I can drop either subject in a joint honours which I think is a good option for me if I do end up being more drawn to one subject. I was originally interested in just an Art degree but, although art teachers agree with this, many other people seem to think it's not a serious degree as Xarao said earlier (mainly those interested in STEM as you said).
Try and Google/LinkedIn search the backgrounds for people working in art therapy. I bet most of them have done Art for undergrad and then a Postgrad psychology/therapy degree, or have dome Psychology/Counselling etc at undergrad and have kept up their artwork behind (and then possible done a combined Masters).

You say you are indecisive, but doing the Joint degree arguably fixes you to art psychotherapy, whereas doing single honours opens up the whole range of roles available to someone with either a full Art degree, or a full psychology degree. It's a myth that joint degrees do this, unless the subjects have a massive overlap. What they actually do is make you half as competitive for jobs in two different areas.
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ajj2000
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I would spend a lot of time googling art foundation degrees and post to a number of forums. When I've heard advice from people in the world of art the advice is always to do the one year art course. This is probably worth checking carefully.
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laurensaweirdo
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
Try and Google/LinkedIn search the backgrounds for people working in art therapy. I bet most of them have done Art for undergrad and then a Postgrad psychology/therapy degree, or have dome Psychology/Counselling etc at undergrad and have kept up their artwork behind (and then possible done a combined Masters).

You say you are indecisive, but doing the Joint degree arguably fixes you to art psychotherapy, whereas doing single honours opens up the whole range of roles available to someone with either a full Art degree, or a full psychology degree. It's a myth that joint degrees do this, unless the subjects have a massive overlap. What they actually do is make you half as competitive for jobs in two different areas.
I suppose it does fix me to art therapy... Oops! At the moment though I am really interested in it but I know that will probably change because I am literally still a child haha. I assumed a joint honours would open up twice the opportunities but if it does limit the subjects I probably will look more into the single honours. I'm leaning more towards art than psychology at the moment which would open up more things, such as art therapy or even teaching or curating. Thank you so much for your help and information, I'm a bit less absolutely terrified now!
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laurensaweirdo
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(Original post by ajj2000)
I would spend a lot of time googling art foundation degrees and post to a number of forums. When I've heard advice from people in the world of art the advice is always to do the one year art course. This is probably worth checking carefully.
Thank you! There are currently two art graduates working at my school who did foundation years so I'll have to interrogate them now...
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