Is there a way for International Student to get into a fully funded Doctorate via NHS

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NowhereMan.111
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As an international student, to study doctorate courses, one can only apply for self-funded places.
I researched a bit about the abovementioned criterion. It would be of great help if anyone could correct me or share the practical application of the rule.
I am planning to do a Conversion course in Psychology in the UK. I'll be funding the course and upon completion will find any kind of job-related to the field which qualifies as a work experience for application of DClincPsych. The most problematic apart from the competitiveness of the journey is the financial aspect after graduation. For international students charged under "overseas fee", they'll have to self-fund the three years, which will be extremely expensive.
I would like to know is there a way to avoid the self-funding aspect for an international student.

I checked out the Oxford application criterion:
"The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."

1. Those who are 'settled' in the UK and meet the main residence requirements
In order to qualify for 'home' fees under this category, you must meet all of the following criteria:

(a) you must be settled in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(b) you must be ordinarily resident in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(c) you must also have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for the full three year period before the first day of the first academic year of the course, for example, if your course begins in October 2018 you must have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2018; and

(d) the main purpose for your residence in the UK and Islands must not have been to receive full-time education during any part of that three-year period.


Considering these legal provisions, how will an international student who has completed his BPS certified MSc. Psychology Conversion from the UK universities. After investing a minimum of 3 years in varied jobs which is only possible on a visa different from Tier 4 Student Visa, can he be classified as an ordinary resident for "home fee" status in order to apply for Oxford Doctorate or any other funded Doctorate position?

Thanking You,
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NowhereMan.111
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As an international student, to study doctorate courses, one can only apply for self-funded places.
I researched a bit about the abovementioned criterion. It would be of great help if anyone could correct me or share the practical application of the rule.
I am planning to do a Conversion course in Psychology in the UK. I'll be funding the course and upon completion will find any kind of job-related to the field which qualifies as a work experience for application of DClincPsych. The most problematic apart from the competitiveness of the journey is the financial aspect after graduation. For international students charged under "overseas fee", they'll have to self-fund the three years, which will be extremely expensive.
I would like to know is there a way to avoid the self-funding aspect for an international student.

I checked out the Oxford application criterion:
"The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."

1. Those who are 'settled' in the UK and meet the main residence requirements
In order to qualify for 'home' fees under this category, you must meet all of the following criteria:

(a) you must be settled in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(b) you must be ordinarily resident in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(c) you must also have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for the full three year period before the first day of the first academic year of the course, for example, if your course begins in October 2018 you must have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2018; and

(d) the main purpose for your residence in the UK and Islands must not have been to receive full-time education during any part of that three-year period.


Considering these legal provisions, how will an international student who has completed his BPS certified MSc. Psychology Conversion from the UK universities. After investing a minimum of 3 years in varied jobs which is only possible on a visa different from Tier 4 Student Visa, can he be classified as an ordinary resident for "home fee" status in order to apply for Oxford Doctorate or any other funded Doctorate position?

Thanking You,
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
As an international student, to study doctorate courses, one can only apply for self-funded places.
I researched a bit about the abovementioned criterion. It would be of great help if anyone could correct me or share the practical application of the rule.
I am planning to do a Conversion course in Psychology in the UK. I'll be funding the course and upon completion will find any kind of job-related to the field which qualifies as a work experience for application of DClincPsych. The most problematic apart from the competitiveness of the journey is the financial aspect after graduation. For international students charged under "overseas fee", they'll have to self-fund the three years, which will be extremely expensive.
I would like to know is there a way to avoid the self-funding aspect for an international student.

I checked out the Oxford application criterion:
"The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."

1. Those who are 'settled' in the UK and meet the main residence requirements
In order to qualify for 'home' fees under this category, you must meet all of the following criteria:

(a) you must be settled in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(b) you must be ordinarily resident in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(c) you must also have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for the full three year period before the first day of the first academic year of the course, for example, if your course begins in October 2018 you must have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2018; and

(d) the main purpose for your residence in the UK and Islands must not have been to receive full-time education during any part of that three-year period.


Considering these legal provisions, how will an international student who has completed his BPS certified MSc. Psychology Conversion from the UK universities. After investing a minimum of 3 years in varied jobs which is only possible on a visa different from Tier 4 Student Visa, can he be classified as an ordinary resident for "home fee" status in order to apply for Oxford Doctorate or any other funded Doctorate position?

Thanking You,
In general, international students are ineligible to even apply for the positions which are funded by the NHS. So only the self-funded options are available for international students which are very expensive.



But I think there is a way through. I am not sure how far this is true in the practical sense but after completing postgrad on a student visa Tier 4, one has to apply for a job that should constitute as relevant work experience for doctorate application (support worker, research assistant, assistant psychologist, etc.).

As per upcoming rule or amendment, the International students will be able to extend their stay for 2 years, post graduating in order to find a job.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...0four%20months.



In order to enrol in these jobs, one has to convert Tier 4 Student Visa to Tier 2 Work Visa and with successfully entering into such jobs.

"The new Immigration Rules introduced on 29 March 2019 allow students to apply to switch into the Tier 2 category in the UK 3 months prior to the expected completion date of their course. You must be applying from the UK and should apply prior to the expiry of your current Tier 4 visa." Source:

https://immigrationbarrister.co.uk/s...ier%204%20visa.



I visited Oxford's criterion for DClinPsy. The course is fully funded and no self-funded applicants are eligible as it stated, "The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."
I think it rules out any international student's application with "overseas fee" status
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/Clin20Oxford.html#funding



The only way out that I can see is, "Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR)" status that must be acquired by international personnel in order to become eligible for funded DClinPsy. This is to convert the status from "overseas fee" to "home-fee" status and to live and work in the UK without immigration restrictions.

For Fee Status: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/entryresidence.html
It states that in order to have "home fee" status, one has to settle in the UK (https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Informatio...and-fee-status)

One such option is to get ILR (https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Informatio...status#settled)



Now, the main thing is to convert one's status from Tier 4 Student Visa after completing postgrad to ILR status. It should take around 5 years after completing graduation. It means after graduation, one has to secure a job to get Tier 2 Work Visa and has to attain a "continuous residence" while earning your days through. You can apply if:

1. you have a Tier 2 (General) visa
2. you’ve been living and working in the UK for 5 years and spent no more than 180 days outside the UK in any 12 months (‘continuous residence’)
3. your employer (sponsor) still needs you for your job - they’ll need to provide a document confirming this
4. your job pays £35,800 or more (unless you’re exempt from the ‘minimum earnings threshold’)
5. you get paid the relevant salary listed in the Codes of Practice
https://www.gov.uk/settle-in-the-uk/...2-general-visa



Moreover, the min. pay criteria should be waived for psychologist or support worker roles as they fall under the exception of the concerned rule

[i.e., has a shortage of workers]

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigrat...ccupation-list



So, to sum up,

1. Complete post-graduate from the UK (Tier 4 Student Visa)

2. Get a job within two years after graduation (related job which constitute relevant work exp. for DClinPsy) Tier 2 Work Visa

3. Remain working for five years with continuous residence status

4. Apply for ILR

4. Apply for DClinPsy


Do provide your insights!!
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
As an international student, to study doctorate courses, one can only apply for self-funded places.
I researched a bit about the abovementioned criterion. It would be of great help if anyone could correct me or share the practical application of the rule.
I am planning to do a Conversion course in Psychology in the UK. I'll be funding the course and upon completion will find any kind of job-related to the field which qualifies as a work experience for application of DClincPsych. The most problematic apart from the competitiveness of the journey is the financial aspect after graduation. For international students charged under "overseas fee", they'll have to self-fund the three years, which will be extremely expensive.
I would like to know is there a way to avoid the self-funding aspect for an international student.

I checked out the Oxford application criterion:
"The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."

1. Those who are 'settled' in the UK and meet the main residence requirements
In order to qualify for 'home' fees under this category, you must meet all of the following criteria:

(a) you must be settled in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(b) you must be ordinarily resident in the UK on the first day of the first academic year of the course; and

(c) you must also have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands for the full three year period before the first day of the first academic year of the course, for example, if your course begins in October 2018 you must have been ordinarily resident in the UK and Islands from 1 September 2015 to 31 August 2018; and

(d) the main purpose for your residence in the UK and Islands must not have been to receive full-time education during any part of that three-year period.


Considering these legal provisions, how will an international student who has completed his BPS certified MSc. Psychology Conversion from the UK universities. After investing a minimum of 3 years in varied jobs which is only possible on a visa different from Tier 4 Student Visa, can he be classified as an ordinary resident for "home fee" status in order to apply for Oxford Doctorate or any other funded Doctorate position?

Thanking You,
(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
In general, international students are ineligible to even apply for the positions which are funded by the NHS. So only the self-funded options are available for international students which are very expensive.



But I think there is a way through. I am not sure how far this is true in the practical sense but after completing postgrad on a student visa Tier 4, one has to apply for a job that should constitute as relevant work experience for doctorate application (support worker, research assistant, assistant psychologist, etc.).

As per upcoming rule or amendment, the International students will be able to extend their stay for 2 years, post graduating in order to find a job.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...0four%20months.



In order to enrol in these jobs, one has to convert Tier 4 Student Visa to Tier 2 Work Visa and with successfully entering into such jobs.

"The new Immigration Rules introduced on 29 March 2019 allow students to apply to switch into the Tier 2 category in the UK 3 months prior to the expected completion date of their course. You must be applying from the UK and should apply prior to the expiry of your current Tier 4 visa." Source:

https://immigrationbarrister.co.uk/s...ier%204%20visa.



I visited Oxford's criterion for DClinPsy. The course is fully funded and no self-funded applicants are eligible as it stated, "The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."
I think it rules out any international student's application with "overseas fee" status
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/Clin20Oxford.html#funding



The only way out that I can see is, "Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR)" status that must be acquired by international personnel in order to become eligible for funded DClinPsy. This is to convert the status from "overseas fee" to "home-fee" status and to live and work in the UK without immigration restrictions.

For Fee Status: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/entryresidence.html
It states that in order to have "home fee" status, one has to settle in the UK (https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Informatio...and-fee-status)

One such option is to get ILR (https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Informatio...status#settled)



Now, the main thing is to convert one's status from Tier 4 Student Visa after completing postgrad to ILR status. It should take around 5 years after completing graduation. It means after graduation, one has to secure a job to get Tier 2 Work Visa and has to attain a "continuous residence" while earning your days through. You can apply if:

1. you have a Tier 2 (General) visa
2. you’ve been living and working in the UK for 5 years and spent no more than 180 days outside the UK in any 12 months (‘continuous residence’)
3. your employer (sponsor) still needs you for your job - they’ll need to provide a document confirming this
4. your job pays £35,800 or more (unless you’re exempt from the ‘minimum earnings threshold’)
5. you get paid the relevant salary listed in the Codes of Practice
https://www.gov.uk/settle-in-the-uk/...2-general-visa



Moreover, the min. pay criteria should be waived for psychologist or support worker roles as they fall under the exception of the concerned rule

[i.e., has a shortage of workers]

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigrat...ccupation-list



So, to sum up,

1. Complete post-graduate from the UK (Tier 4 Student Visa)

2. Get a job within two years after graduation (related job which constitute relevant work exp. for DClinPsy) Tier 2 Work Visa

3. Remain working for five years with continuous residence status

4. Apply for ILR

4. Apply for DClinPsy



Do provide your insights!!
Last edited by NowhereMan.111; 1 month ago
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Noodlzzz
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You do know you just quoted yourself?
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by Noodlzzz)
You do know you just quoted yourself?
Yes, I do know it, but didn't know if it'll be a concern of you, that is to add to what I asked before. These are new aspects I found about the abovementioned issue. Thanks for pointing out though.
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Noodlzzz
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Yes, I do know it, but didn't know if it'll be a concern of you, that is to add to what I asked before. These are new aspects I found about the abovementioned issue. Thanks for pointing out though.
apologies, I thought you had miss judged the OP
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
In general, international students are ineligible to even apply for the positions which are funded by the NHS. So only the self-funded options are available for international students which are very expensive.



But I think there is a way through. I am not sure how far this is true in the practical sense but after completing postgrad on a student visa Tier 4, one has to apply for a job that should constitute as relevant work experience for doctorate application (support worker, research assistant, assistant psychologist, etc.).

As per upcoming rule or amendment, the International students will be able to extend their stay for 2 years, post graduating in order to find a job.

https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...0four%20months.



In order to enrol in these jobs, one has to convert Tier 4 Student Visa to Tier 2 Work Visa and with successfully entering into such jobs.

"The new Immigration Rules introduced on 29 March 2019 allow students to apply to switch into the Tier 2 category in the UK 3 months prior to the expected completion date of their course. You must be applying from the UK and should apply prior to the expiry of your current Tier 4 visa." Source:

https://immigrationbarrister.co.uk/s...ier%204%20visa.



I visited Oxford's criterion for DClinPsy. The course is fully funded and no self-funded applicants are eligible as it stated, "The Oxford Course only accepts candidates who are already eligible to live and work in the UK on a permanent basis. Applicants are required to have home fees status and should meet NHS bursary eligibility."
I think it rules out any international student's application with "overseas fee" status
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/Clin20Oxford.html#funding



The only way out that I can see is, "Indefinite Leave to Remain (ILR)" status that must be acquired by international personnel in order to become eligible for funded DClinPsy. This is to convert the status from "overseas fee" to "home-fee" status and to live and work in the UK without immigration restrictions.

For Fee Status: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/chpccp/entryresidence.html
It states that in order to have "home fee" status, one has to settle in the UK (https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Informatio...and-fee-status)

One such option is to get ILR (https://www.ukcisa.org.uk/Informatio...status#settled)



Now, the main thing is to convert one's status from Tier 4 Student Visa after completing postgrad to ILR status. It should take around 5 years after completing graduation. It means after graduation, one has to secure a job to get Tier 2 Work Visa and has to attain a "continuous residence" while earning your days through. You can apply if:

1. you have a Tier 2 (General) visa
2. you’ve been living and working in the UK for 5 years and spent no more than 180 days outside the UK in any 12 months (‘continuous residence’)
3. your employer (sponsor) still needs you for your job - they’ll need to provide a document confirming this
4. your job pays £35,800 or more (unless you’re exempt from the ‘minimum earnings threshold’)
5. you get paid the relevant salary listed in the Codes of Practice
https://www.gov.uk/settle-in-the-uk/...2-general-visa



Moreover, the min. pay criteria should be waived for psychologist or support worker roles as they fall under the exception of the concerned rule

[i.e., has a shortage of workers]

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/immigrat...ccupation-list



So, to sum up,

1. Complete post-graduate from the UK (Tier 4 Student Visa)

2. Get a job within two years after graduation (related job which constitute relevant work exp. for DClinPsy) Tier 2 Work Visa

3. Remain working for five years with continuous residence status

4. Apply for ILR

4. Apply for DClinPsy



Do provide your insights!!
What insight do you want? You reckon you've found a way through the system. If you want to do it, crack on.

Chances of you actually doing - next to nil if you want my insight. It would be far more straightforward to do this in your home country, cheaper and faster. You are forgetting the turbulence and inevitable rule changes that will be created by a post-Covid and post-Brexit world. You are forgetting the competition. You've got no back up plan. All you are doing is stringing theoreticals together, and no-one is going to check your homework for you, especially when you've given no context to this urgent need to get a free education from another country's tax payers.

However, this is the 3rd or fourth thread you've made on this. Just get on and do it if you think it is possible.
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by threeportdrift)
What insight do you want? You reckon you've found a way through the system. If you want to do it, crack on.

Chances of you actually doing - next to nil if you want my insight. It would be far more straightforward to do this in your home country, cheaper and faster. You are forgetting the turbulence and inevitable rule changes that will be created by a post-Covid and post-Brexit world. You are forgetting the competition. You've got no back up plan. All you are doing is stringing theoreticals together, and no-one is going to check your homework for you, especially when you've given no context to this urgent need to get a free education from another country's tax payers.

However, this is the 3rd or fourth thread you've made on this. Just get on and do it if you think it is possible.
"We are the hollow men
We are the stuffed men
Leaning together
Headpiece filled with straw. Alas!
Our dried voices, when
We whisper together
Are quiet and meaningless
As wind in dry grass
Or rats' feet over broken glass
In our dry cellar

Shape without form, shade without colour,
Paralysed force, gesture without motion;

Those who have crossed
With direct eyes, to death's other Kingdom
Remember us-if at all-not as lost
Violent souls, but only
As the hollow men
The stuffed men."

I reckon I found the system.*
Anyways, always good to know your judgmental opinions (judgment under the garb of insights) about the situation. Just to clarify, the system I found, I'll too contribute to the tax regime and will continue to do so in addition to the large differential amount initially invested as an international student.
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threeportdrift
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Anyways, always good to know your judgmental opinions (judgment under the garb of insights) .
How do you know I have no insight into this? Judging the sort of people you think you will find on TSR much?
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PhoenixFortune
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Anyways, always good to know your judgmental opinions (judgment under the garb of insights) about the situation. Just to clarify, the system I found, I'll too contribute to the tax regime and will continue to do so in addition to the large differential amount initially invested as an international student.
If you think you have a plan, just do it then. You'll soon find out whether it has any holes or issues.
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