Clauxery373277
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I want to have a future job in management or finance and I was wondering out of all these, which is the best for me to apply for to get a degree and possibly a PhD in:
Economics and Fiannce at the University of Manchester
Business and Management at the University of Manchester
Business and Management at the University of Durham
Business and Management at the University of Leeds
Business and Management at the University of Lancaster

But yeah I want a finance or management related job so I was just wondering on what employers prefer, what gives better job opportunities and what gives better salaries.


From what I've seen so far a lot of people say Economics is the better degree but that Business means you can do a wider range of jobs. But I don't know which to do. My dad has a friend who has a PhD in Economics and couldn't get any jobs in the UK so had to move to a different country in Europe to. That's kinda putting me a bit off Economics because I don't want to struggle finding jobs at the same time everyone saying Business is a weak degree is putting me off Business so I don't know which to choose.

Finally, if I should do Business, out of the Uni's I said which should I apply To?
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MindMax2000
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Firstly, if you want a job in management or finance, you wouldn't really need a PhD. Why do you want to study for a PhD? If you're going for a research specific role, then a PhD makes sense. If you do, you will have a preference on what you want study anyway.

A business and management degree won't really cover the level of material you will particularly need for finance, although people tend to be trained from the bottom up in the sector anyway. Management jobs aren't particularly picky about the subject of your degree, as far as I know.
You may have exemptions for exams in professional accounting qualifications, but that will depend on the modules you choose, and you should be able to get exemptions from both business and management and economics and finance degrees.

For me, the economics and finance degree will probably be more useful than the business and management degrees, but I might be biased.
If you want to start your own business, the business and management degree may be useful if you are going in with no experience (not recommended).

In terms of postgrad, I think you can do a postgrad in business with an economics and finance degree, but you can't do a postgrad in economics or finance with a business and management. However, you might want to check this with your choice of universities and their postgrad programs.

I'd go with Manchester and Durham as top choices for their degrees.
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Clauxery373277
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Firstly, if you want a job in management or finance, you wouldn't really need a PhD. Why do you want to study for a PhD? If you're going for a research specific role, then a PhD makes sense. If you do, you will have a preference on what you want study anyway.

A business and management degree won't really cover the level of material you will particularly need for finance, although people tend to be trained from the bottom up in the sector anyway. Management jobs aren't particularly picky about the subject of your degree, as far as I know.
You may have exemptions for exams in professional accounting qualifications, but that will depend on the modules you choose, and you should be able to get exemptions from both business and management and economics and finance degrees.

For me, the economics and finance degree will probably be more useful than the business and management degrees, but I might be biased.
If you want to start your own business, the business and management degree may be useful if you are going in with no experience (not recommended).

In terms of postgrad, I think you can do a postgrad in business with an economics and finance degree, but you can't do a postgrad in economics or finance with a business and management. However, you might want to check this with your choice of universities and their postgrad programs.

I'd go with Manchester and Durham as top choices for their degrees.
Thanks.
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Clauxery373277
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(Original post by MindMax2000)
Firstly, if you want a job in management or finance, you wouldn't really need a PhD. Why do you want to study for a PhD? If you're going for a research specific role, then a PhD makes sense. If you do, you will have a preference on what you want study anyway.

A business and management degree won't really cover the level of material you will particularly need for finance, although people tend to be trained from the bottom up in the sector anyway. Management jobs aren't particularly picky about the subject of your degree, as far as I know.
You may have exemptions for exams in professional accounting qualifications, but that will depend on the modules you choose, and you should be able to get exemptions from both business and management and economics and finance degrees.

For me, the economics and finance degree will probably be more useful than the business and management degrees, but I might be biased.
If you want to start your own business, the business and management degree may be useful if you are going in with no experience (not recommended).

In terms of postgrad, I think you can do a postgrad in business with an economics and finance degree, but you can't do a postgrad in economics or finance with a business and management. However, you might want to check this with your choice of universities and their postgrad programs.

I'd go with Manchester and Durham as top choices for their degrees.
One last question though. Would it give me more post graduate chances if I chose Business then did a degree at Manchester/Durham then applied and got accepted to the Harvard or Yale Business school or not? Or will going to those Business schools not do much after Uni?
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MindMax2000
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(Original post by Clauxery373277)
One last question though. Would it give me more post graduate chances if I chose Business then did a degree at Manchester/Durham then applied and got accepted to the Harvard or Yale Business school or not? Or will going to those Business schools not do much after Uni?
I didn't quite understand your first question

Postgrad will depend on what you have studied in your undergrad, and possibly where e.g. there is next to no chance of me doing a postgrad in engineering if I did an undergrad in business; I'd need an undergrad in engineering or physics and maths heavy subjects. I'd focus more on what I enjoy studying.

In terms of business schools, it will depend on why you want to do a postgrad in business. If it's for employment/promotion prospects, it makes sense to go to the top 25 business schools in the world for an MBA (they're that competitive, and the jobs are even more ridiculous). If it's to start a business, I wouldn't go - it's very expensive to get an education that you can easily get without going to business school.
I can't really comment on doing an MA or MSc in other business related subjects though. If it's for a subject like marketing, there are cheaper alternatives e.g. CIM. If it's for accounting, a professional accounting qualification will be the equivalent to a master's. I'd check very carefully what the job requirements are for promotions.
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