Joshua/dfm
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I'm intending to a Law degree or a Classics degree + conversion at uni, and wondered if anyone could offer some ideas? My contending A-level options are (realistically):

-Latin
-Classical Greek
-History
-English Literature
-Maths

I will definitely take Latin and Classical Greek (the first is generally compulsory, it seems nonsensical not to do the latter as I enjoy it, am good at it, and it will become necessary in Y2).

However, I don't whether to pursue both History and English Literature (the workload shouldn't be an issue, I just worry about restricting my field of study somewhat) or to take one of the essay subjects + Maths.

I really enjoy them all, and am predicted grade 9 in all five subjects. I just wanted suggestions as to whether Maths would provide helpful scientific background in the realms of intellectual property/complex litigation/other forms of law with a numerical side.
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DoNotMove
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(Original post by Joshua/dfm)
I'm intending to a Law degree or a Classics degree + conversion at uni, and wondered if anyone could offer some ideas? My contending A-level options are (realistically):

-Latin
-Classical Greek
-History
-English Literature
-Maths

I will definitely take Latin and Classical Greek (the first is generally compulsory, it seems nonsensical not to do the latter as I enjoy it, am good at it, and it will become necessary in Y2).

However, I don't whether to pursue both History and English Literature (the workload shouldn't be an issue, I just worry about restricting my field of study somewhat) or to take one of the essay subjects + Maths.

I really enjoy them all, and am predicted grade 9 in all five subjects. I just wanted suggestions as to whether Maths would provide helpful scientific background in the realms of intellectual property/complex litigation/other forms of law with a numerical side.
As far as I know, A-Level Maths won't be at all useful for Law. If you're going to get a 9 in Maths at GCSE you'll be quite okay should you need to do Maths in a future degree. You're better off choosing which two you prefer of the three (Maths, Eng Lit, History). Personally, I'd suggest you do Maths, as then you're not doing 4 essay subjects.
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Quick-use
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(Original post by Joshua/dfm)
I'm intending to a Law degree or a Classics degree + conversion at uni, and wondered if anyone could offer some ideas? My contending A-level options are (realistically):

-Latin
-Classical Greek
-History
-English Literature
-Maths

I will definitely take Latin and Classical Greek (the first is generally compulsory, it seems nonsensical not to do the latter as I enjoy it, am good at it, and it will become necessary in Y2).

However, I don't whether to pursue both History and English Literature (the workload shouldn't be an issue, I just worry about restricting my field of study somewhat) or to take one of the essay subjects + Maths.

I really enjoy them all, and am predicted grade 9 in all five subjects. I just wanted suggestions as to whether Maths would provide helpful scientific background in the realms of intellectual property/complex litigation/other forms of law with a numerical side.
Really doesn't matter what you do for your final A level. That said, I'd personally advocate History because of how good preparation it is for university study. History is also extremely relevant to both Law and Classics since you'll basically be doing the exact same type of analysis at university but of legal or Hellenistic contexts.

For usefulness and relevance alone, I'd 100% go for History but it's up to you on which one you'd enjoy / will do the best in.

As an aside, please just do 3 A levels. Doing 4 does not give you an advantage or look impressive in your application whatsoever; universities literally ignore anything more than 3. However, if your school historically has extremely high attainment, then I believe Oxbridge (if you're considering applying) might expect 4 or an EPQ. Best to directly email them and ask, though.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Joshua/dfm)
I'm intending to a Law degree or a Classics degree + conversion at uni, and wondered if anyone could offer some ideas? My contending A-level options are (realistically):

-Latin
-Classical Greek
-History
-English Literature
-Maths

I will definitely take Latin and Classical Greek (the first is generally compulsory, it seems nonsensical not to do the latter as I enjoy it, am good at it, and it will become necessary in Y2).

However, I don't whether to pursue both History and English Literature (the workload shouldn't be an issue, I just worry about restricting my field of study somewhat) or to take one of the essay subjects + Maths.

I really enjoy them all, and am predicted grade 9 in all five subjects. I just wanted suggestions as to whether Maths would provide helpful scientific background in the realms of intellectual property/complex litigation/other forms of law with a numerical side.
I think Maths would show you are an all rounder so would probably pick it over English Lit if you genuinely feel you could do it just as easily. Surprisingly quite a few students at top Unis for Law do have Maths A level although History is the most common A level they hold.
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McGinger
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1) There are no specific subjects required for Law. You could be doing 3 sciences or an art/music combo, as long as you have the high grades thats fine. An 'essay based subject' is useful for text/writing skills but is in no way essential.

2) Drop a subject. No University asks for 4 subjects and it wont get you 'ooo clever' credit. If anything, you are risking getting decent grades in the three you actually need. Too often it results in four weaker grades - and no Uni place. AAA will always look better than ABBB.

Suggestions :
Manchester : https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u.../subjects/law/
Bristol : http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/2020/law/
UCL : https://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/study/undergraduate
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Joshua/dfm
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(Original post by McGinger)
1) There are no specific subjects required for Law. You could be doing 3 sciences or an art/music combo, as long as you have the high grades thats fine. An 'essay based subject' is useful for text/writing skills but is in no way essential.

2) Drop a subject. No University asks for 4 subjects and it wont get you 'ooo clever' credit. If anything, you are risking getting decent grades in the three you actually need. Too often it results in four weaker grades - and no Uni place. AAA will always look better than ABBB.

Suggestions :
Manchester : https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/u.../subjects/law/
Bristol : http://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/2020/law/
UCL : https://www.ucl.ac.uk/laws/study/undergraduate
Although I really appreciate everyone's (valid) advice against doing a 4th A-level, our school makes it compulsory (except in very rare cases in which you can do the 4th as an AS) to do all four over 2 years. I really don't want to apply to a different Sixth Form with the intention of going as I am already settled at this school, I have direct access to the advice of current teachers about the A-level courses, and it could be quite difficult to find a department of classical languages anywhere nearby.

That said, I really appreciate everyone's advice!
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Classics_Teacher
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(Original post by Joshua/dfm)
it could be quite difficult to find a department of classical languages anywhere nearby.
Yes - and it's getting harder, unfortunately! Most schools only offer Latin rather than Greek as well. The school that I teach at is dropping Latin at the end of this academic year (used to be a grammar school, now no longer the case).
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