Cirk53211
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Hello, I've recently been a victim of fraud and my Lloyd's account was closed back in June. I registered at Natwest a week later, however recently NatWest closed my account without disclosing any information onto why they closed it. Now I'm having trouble opening a new bank account. I've checked my credit score and it doesn't show me that it has a CIFAS marker, so I'm confused onto why I've been blacklisted or is it not visible for me? I'm very confused and I have no idea what to do. Any advice will help plzzzzz
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Admit-One
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(Original post by Cirk53211)
Hello, I've recently been a victim of fraud and my Lloyd's account was closed back in June. I registered at Natwest a week later, however recently NatWest closed my account without disclosing any information onto why they closed it. Now I'm having trouble opening a new bank account. I've checked my credit score and it doesn't show me that it has a CIFAS marker, so I'm confused onto why I've been blacklisted or is it not visible for me? I'm very confused and I have no idea what to do. Any advice will help plzzzzz
I would submit a Subject Access Request to CIFAS. Info here:

https://www.cifas.org.uk/contact-us/...access-request

NB. As the victim of fraud, how did you raise the matter with your bank or the police? Did you share your bank details with another party?
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Cirk53211
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(Original post by Admit-One)
I would submit a Subject Access Request to CIFAS. Info here:

https://www.cifas.org.uk/contact-us/...access-request

NB. As the victim of fraud, how did you raise the matter with your bank or the police? Did you share your bank details with another party?
A person who I knew from my college asked me if I wanted to make money. I asked him if it was illegal he said no. My naiive self shared my banking information to him and surprise surprise turns out it he did fraud on my account.
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Cirk53211
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(Original post by Admit-One)
I would submit a Subject Access Request to CIFAS. Info here:

https://www.cifas.org.uk/contact-us/...access-request

NB. As the victim of fraud, how did you raise the matter with your bank or the police? Did you share your bank details with another party?
The bank didn't believe me, since I did use my phone to transfer a large sum of money (roughly over £1000) to an unknown account. Having full trust for my so called friend I didn't question his actions and I feel pretty stupid to this day lol.
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Sh_A
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Cifas markers are not related to or linked to credit agencies, and thus won’t show up in any credit report. You need to make a direct request through Cifas, something known as a DSAR, if you Google it, the steps are pretty clear.
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Cirk53211
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(Original post by Sh_A)
Cifas markers are not related to or linked to credit agencies, and thus won’t show up in any credit report. You need to make a direct request through Cifas, something known as a DSAR, if you Google it, the steps are pretty clear.
Ohhh okay no problem, thank so much for the help
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Admit-One
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(Original post by Cirk53211)
A person who I knew from my college asked me if I wanted to make money. I asked him if it was illegal he said no. My naiive self shared my banking information to him and surprise surprise turns out it he did fraud on my account.
If it makes you feel any better, we see a lot of young posters who fall for similar scams and end up with a CIFAS marker. There really needs to be better guidance given by banks and parents.

Form the banks POV you’ve conducted fraud through the account, (even by naivety), so in that sense they were right to add the marker and in honesty I don’t think they will remove it.

There’s not much advice I can give. The marker is in place for 6 years and you’ll struggle to get an account with any mainstream bank for that time, (you’ll likely also struggle with any credit line - loans, payment plans etc). Monzo used to be the go-to but it seems they now check for CIFAS too. I can only advise that you shop around smaller banks/building societies or try a credit union.
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Cirk53211
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(Original post by Admit-One)
If it makes you feel any better, we see a lot of young posters who fall for similar scams and end up with a CIFAS marker. There really needs to be better guidance given by banks and parents.

Form the banks POV you’ve conducted fraud through the account, (even by naivety), so in that sense they were right to add the marker and in honesty I don’t think they will remove it.

There’s not much advice I can give. The marker is in place for 6 years and you’ll struggle to get an account with any mainstream bank for that time, (you’ll likely also struggle with any credit line - loans, payment plans etc). Monzo used to be the go-to but it seems they now check for CIFAS too. I can only advise that you shop around smaller banks/building societies or try a credit union.
Thanks sooo much for this advice. Any info is appreciated having known now that I'll struggle registering at the main banks for 6 years is hard to take in, but it's better finding out sooner than later I guess. Do you know any small banks I can register at?
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Admit-One)
If it makes you feel any better, we see a lot of young posters who fall for similar scams and end up with a CIFAS marker. There really needs to be better guidance given by banks and parents.
IMO it's a cause and effect thing, the more people post their CIFAS woes here the more of them it attracts through google and we have to listen to all their highly suspicious tales :rolleyes:, at this point i wouldn't be surprised if fraudsters gave out little cheat sheets of what to say when the bank catches you, at this point it's as plausible as 'I bought it off some guy in a pub but I didn't see his face or know his name'.

It's arguable banks and parents could always do more, but I feel banks are pretty straight about not giving out details and various fraud prevention. Everytime I make payments with my bank, esp new ones, i'm harangued by 'Do you know this person?' 'Is this an investment?' 'have you been asked to send this by a stranger?' and so on, I can't pretend the bank isn't actively trying to make me aware.
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Cirk53211
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(Original post by StriderHort)
IMO it's a cause and effect thing, the more people post their CIFAS woes here the more of them it attracts through google and we have to listen to all their highly suspicious tales :rolleyes:, at this point i wouldn't be surprised if fraudsters gave out little cheat sheets of what to say when the bank catches you, at this point it's as plausible as 'I bought it off some guy in a pub but I didn't see his face or know his name'.

It's arguable banks and parents could always do more, but I feel banks are pretty straight about not giving out details and various fraud prevention. Everytime I make payments with my bank, esp new ones, i'm harangued by 'Do you know this person?' 'Is this an investment?' 'have you been asked to send this by a stranger?' and so on, I can't pretend the bank isn't actively trying to make me aware.
I'm telling the truth yo 😅. It was just me being naiive. I'm not a convicted fraudster and would never do something unethical.
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boulderingislife
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(Original post by Cirk53211)
A person who I knew from my college asked me if I wanted to make money. I asked him if it was illegal he said no. My naiive self shared my banking information to him and surprise surprise turns out it he did fraud on my account.
Not another one of these threads :facepalm2:
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boulderingislife
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(Original post by Cirk53211)
A person who I knew from my college asked me if I wanted to make money. I asked him if it was illegal he said no. My naiive self shared my banking information to him and surprise surprise turns out it he did fraud on my account.
Not another one of these threads :facepalm2:

Check out this OP. Maybe you can touch base with the OP of that thread to see how he resolved the problem?
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6710240
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Cirk53211
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(Original post by boulderingislife)
Not another one of these threads :facepalm2:

Check out this OP. Maybe you can touch base with the OP of that thread to see how he resolved the problem?
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6710240
Oh no problem tanks
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ch0c0h01ic
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(Original post by StriderHort)
IMO it's a cause and effect thing, the more people post their CIFAS woes here the more of them it attracts through google and we have to listen to all their highly suspicious tales :rolleyes:, at this point i wouldn't be surprised if fraudsters gave out little cheat sheets of what to say when the bank catches you, at this point it's as plausible as 'I bought it off some guy in a pub but I didn't see his face or know his name'.

It's arguable banks and parents could always do more, but I feel banks are pretty straight about not giving out details and various fraud prevention. Everytime I make payments with my bank, esp new ones, i'm harangued by 'Do you know this person?' 'Is this an investment?' 'have you been asked to send this by a stranger?' and so on, I can't pretend the bank isn't actively trying to make me aware.
:Victim of fraud or: Complicit in fraud / money laundering just didn't expect to be caught

These sorts of things went on when I was a kid, and even then you always knew something shady/illegal was going on. Unsurprisingly even then ignorance and playing the victim card were the defence of choice.

Unfortunately some people are more willing than others to ignore the legalities out of greed, or simply because they thought that they wouldn't get caught.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Cirk53211)
A person who I knew from my college asked me if I wanted to make money. I asked him if it was illegal he said no. My naiive self shared my banking information to him and surprise surprise turns out it he did fraud on my account.
(Original post by Cirk53211)
I'm telling the truth yo 😅. It was just me being naiive. I'm not a convicted fraudster and would never do something unethical.
You are deluded you gave this person your bank account details with the view to making money from doing so. That makes you a full part of the fraud. Banks wont wnat you because you are a risk that you will do such a thing again. The reason Natwest didnt stop you is because Lloyds wont have registered the cifas in time.

You cna try Monozo or you are going to have to find prepaid cards or new internet banks that might consider you. Apparently Monzo are less friendly than they were to people with cifas markers and have been closing people down lately.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Cirk53211)
I'm telling the truth yo 😅. It was just me being naiive. I'm not a convicted fraudster and would never do something unethical.
I'm not so much talking about you specifically, but the thing is allowing your account to be used by others for fraud is still seen largely the same in terms of risk. in brief, they would ask themselves if a reasonable person (who had of course read, understood and signed the account agreement) would have done what you did, and the answer is generally no, they ewouldn;t have gave access to their bank expecting money for nothing.

This sort of gullibility seems a lot more common these days tbh, when I was a teen in 90's you knew not to let people mess with your bank and that mule/switch schemes are like Ponzi schemes, they work out great for everyone apart from the poor schmuck at the end who always gets it in the neck sooner or later (you)

Remember CIFASs role isn't to punish fraudsters, it's to warn their clients of fraud risk either intentional or indirect.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Monzo are less friendly than they were to people with cifas markers and have been closing people down lately.
They prob got pissed off at all the prats on forums swearing Monzo were too stupid to check CIFAS markers despite being a member.
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999tigger
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(Original post by StriderHort)
They prob got pissed off at all the prats on forums swearing Monzo were too stupid to check CIFAS markers despite being a member.
Nope Mozo did officially consider people with CIFAS.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by 999tigger)
Nope Mozo did officially consider people with CIFAS.
I'm talking about the ones that literally swore Monzo didn't check at all and would accept any old crap, consider is v different
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Cirk53211
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bruh 😭
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