olivka
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What are the examinators looking for when marking essay questions for example an extract question in the gcse paper. And how would I structure my answer?
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YGSK
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Mr Salles has the best videos on this. But in summary you need to be:

Perceptive with your analysis. E.g don’t say things that everyone will say. For example, if you are doing Macbeth some people might analyse “fair is foul and foul is fair” to show that the witches are evil, but you can bring 2 interpretations to this also saying that the paradoxical chiasmus and equivocation highlights their deception, foreshadowing Macbeth’s fall from heroism to regicide through the trickery in their prophecies.

Also put context with you analysis. E.g if you are doing Inspector calls don’t say “community and all that nonsense” shows that Mr Birling is very selfish and does not believe in helping anyone in society. Priestley was a socialist and voted labour with 10 million others. These points don’t link the best so put it as - “community and all that nonsense” emphasises Mr Birling to be very selfish and not helping others, which Priestley could perhaps use to highlight his socialist views, as to a Russian audience where the play was first performed there communist ideology would directly contrast how “community” was “nonsense”.

Also use word classes like this verb instead of this word

Embed your quotes as well. E.g Mr Birling is portrayed as a “hard-headed” business man who is enshrined in a selfish capitalist state as he does not believe in helping the “community and all that nonsense”. Don’t say Mr Birling is selfish. The quote “community and all that nonsense” shows this.

Also have a introduction showing your argument, and a conclusion as well which i use to show the authors overall purpose of that character/theme.

Hope this helps xxx
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Panjsuce
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They are looking for a “conceptualised” approach to the question at hand - i.e. you have a sound understanding of the text in order to form an argument that is critical and analyses key literary concepts that the writer uses. Having an overview of how the theme/character is portrayed for a writers’ purposes at the start and then exploring further in your main paragraphs is a secure way of ensuring you’ve controlled your essay well.

For the extract question, a typical approach is the ‘overview’ type introduction, one (or two) developed paragraph on the extract and then the rest of the essay on elsewhere in the text (you might link what you say back to stuff in the extract possibly). Make sure you talk at length about elsewhere and don’t depend on the extract entirely - you must discuss elsewhere.
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olivka
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(Original post by yash Kainth)
Mr Salles has the best videos on this. But in summary you need to be:

Perceptive with your analysis. E.g don’t say things that everyone will say. For example, if you are doing Macbeth some people might analyse “fair is foul and foul is fair” to show that the witches are evil, but you can bring 2 interpretations to this also saying that the paradoxical chiasmus and equivocation highlights their deception, foreshadowing Macbeth’s fall from heroism to regicide through the trickery in their prophecies.

Also put context with you analysis. E.g if you are doing Inspector calls don’t say “community and all that nonsense” shows that Mr Birling is very selfish and does not believe in helping anyone in society. Priestley was a socialist and voted labour with 10 million others. These points don’t link the best so put it as - “community and all that nonsense” emphasises Mr Birling to be very selfish and not helping others, which Priestley could perhaps use to highlight his socialist views, as to a Russian audience where the play was first performed there communist ideology would directly contrast how “community” was “nonsense”.

Also use word classes like this verb instead of this word

Embed your quotes as well. E.g Mr Birling is portrayed as a “hard-headed” business man who is enshrined in a selfish capitalist state as he does not believe in helping the “community and all that nonsense”. Don’t say Mr Birling is selfish. The quote “community and all that nonsense” shows this.

Also have a introduction showing your argument, and a conclusion as well which i use to show the authors overall purpose of that character/theme.

Hope this helps xxx
Ironically, I am doing both of the mentioned above. This clears up so much for me. Thank you, going to have to reread all those books and look more into it.
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olivka
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(Original post by Panjsuce)
They are looking for a “conceptualised” approach to the question at hand - i.e. you have a sound understanding of the text in order to form an argument that is critical and analyses key literary concepts that the writer uses. Having an overview of how the theme/character is portrayed for a writers’ purposes at the start and then exploring further in your main paragraphs is a secure way of ensuring you’ve controlled your essay well.

For the extract question, a typical approach is the ‘overview’ type introduction, one (or two) developed paragraph on the extract and then the rest of the essay on elsewhere in the text (you might link what you say back to stuff in the extract possibly). Make sure you talk at length about elsewhere and don’t depend on the extract entirely - you must discuss elsewhere.
Okay thank you, I will have this in mind
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olivka
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How much does structure matter when writing these answered compared to language?
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