CaptainBoy123
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hey guys i understand this question but all I really want to know is why when integrating the van't hoff equation, why are the the equilibrium constant values (K) the 2 numbers on the left hand side of the integral and why are the 2 temperatures on the right hand side on the equation. How do you exactly know which numebers go where?

https://imgur.com/a/bDCtPlK - hopefully u guys can see this imgur link
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mqb2766
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(Original post by CaptainBoy123)
hey guys i understand this question but all I really want to know is why when integrating the van't hoff equation, why are the the equilibrium constant values (K) the 2 numbers on the left hand side of the integral and why are the 2 temperatures on the right hand side on the equation. How do you exactly know which numebers go where?

https://imgur.com/a/bDCtPlK - hopefully u guys can see this imgur link
You're integrating with respect to temperature in the right and with respect to ln(Kp) on the left. The limits are the values of those variables.
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Haywood1743
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The top number of the intergral is b and the bottom is a when you sub back in after the intergration you do b minus a, on the left hand side you use log laws that's why it's divide
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CaptainBoy123
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(Original post by mqb2766)
You're integrating with respect to temperature in the right and with respect to ln(Kp) on the left. The limits are the values of those variables.
How do you know exactly you're integrating wrt to ln(Kp) on the left and integrating wrt to temp on the right? It doesn't specifically say
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CaptainBoy123
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(Original post by Haywood1743)
The top number of the intergral is b and the bottom is a when you sub back in after the intergration you do b minus a, on the left hand side you use log laws that's why it's divide
How do you know exactly you're integrating wrt to ln(Kp) on the left and integrating wrt to temp on the right? It doesn't specifically say

Sorry the way i worded the question was poor
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simon0
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(Original post by CaptainBoy123)
How do you know exactly you're integrating wrt to ln(Kp) on the left and integrating wrt to temp on the right? It doesn't specifically say

Sorry the way i worded the question was poor
Note:

 \displaystyle \int^{b}_{a} f(x) \, dx = F(b) - F(a),

where  dF / dx = f .

Also  dx indicates which variable you are intrgrating with respect to (in this case x).
Last edited by simon0; 1 month ago
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mqb2766
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(Original post by CaptainBoy123)
How do you know exactly you're integrating wrt to ln(Kp) on the left and integrating wrt to temp on the right? It doesn't specifically say
You integrate both sides with respect to temp, but on the left
d ln(Kp)/dT dT
Becomes just
d ln(Kp)
So it's just the integral wrt ln(Kp), hence the change of variables.
Last edited by mqb2766; 1 month ago
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