KaminariSparky
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Just as the title says. All my life I've been at the top of my class academically, and even up until last year I was putting in minimal revision and getting grades that were more or less hitting my target or above.

I have my mocks in six weeks (beginning Nov. 30th to Dec. 11th) and I literally don't know how to revise. I just lose interest in whatever I'm doing and get distracted, and none of it sticks, or I get frustrated by not understanding something and how to fix it.

For example, right now I'm sitting trying to do a higher tier AQA maths paper, which is what I'll be sitting in my mocks. Whenever I don't understand something/get it wrong the given answer makes sense, but I don't know how to remember it. I'm making the same mistakes and I just don't know how to make it stick.

In theory, I could probably get through all my mocks with minimal revision as I have done in the past, but with COVID and just the fact that they're my actual mocks I don't want to risk screwing it up, especially if that's what my final grade will be judged on if I don't get to sit my actual exams.

So what I'm asking is this: is it normal to be like this? I can't physically make myself sit and do revision without getting so bored that it doesn't stick, and regardless I have no method that actually interests me enough to keep focus; making mindmaps is great except I never remember what I put on there, flashcards frustrate me, practice papers take far too long and I get bored with them and start cheating etc. I don't know what to do.
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dylgeo
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If you’re having trouble trying to revise, think of the future. Procrastinating may be good in the short term, but in a few months it will be the very opposite. I used to have trouble concentrating as well until I thought of my future and whether I would be successful or living in a car park under Tesco. The best way is to just go cold turkey on distractions and get on with it 🙂
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by KaminariSparky)
Just as the title says. All my life I've been at the top of my class academically, and even up until last year I was putting in minimal revision and getting grades that were more or less hitting my target or above.

I have my mocks in six weeks (beginning Nov. 30th to Dec. 11th) and I literally don't know how to revise. I just lose interest in whatever I'm doing and get distracted, and none of it sticks, or I get frustrated by not understanding something and how to fix it.

For example, right now I'm sitting trying to do a higher tier AQA maths paper, which is what I'll be sitting in my mocks. Whenever I don't understand something/get it wrong the given answer makes sense, but I don't know how to remember it. I'm making the same mistakes and I just don't know how to make it stick.

In theory, I could probably get through all my mocks with minimal revision as I have done in the past, but with COVID and just the fact that they're my actual mocks I don't want to risk screwing it up, especially if that's what my final grade will be judged on if I don't get to sit my actual exams.

So what I'm asking is this: is it normal to be like this? I can't physically make myself sit and do revision without getting so bored that it doesn't stick, and regardless I have no method that actually interests me enough to keep focus; making mindmaps is great except I never remember what I put on there, flashcards frustrate me, practice papers take far too long and I get bored with them and start cheating etc. I don't know what to do.
Hi!

this is completely normal. I've been told that you should work solidly for about 30 minutes then rest for ten. In this 10 minutes I usually go for a walk round the block, as exercise improves the function of the brain. Then go back to working afterwards. Remember rest is important!
In regards to memory, I use to make an A3 poster for each module in my subject with all the key points on and making it really colourful and coordinated.
I then try and memorise this poster and copy it from memory, but without all the colour and fancy bits. In a different coloured pen i then add what I had missed from memory.
Or I make plans of potential essay questions, which include all the key facts. Similarly i memorise this and try and copy it from memory. In a different coloured pen i then add what I had missed from memory, as a change in colour can be helpful for memory.


I hope this helps and good luck!
Chloe - Official Student Rep
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KaminariSparky
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(Original post by dylgeo)
If you’re having trouble trying to revise, think of the future. Procrastinating may be good in the short term, but in a few months it will be the very opposite. I used to have trouble concentrating as well until I thought of my future and whether I would be successful or living in a car park under Tesco. The best way is to just go cold turkey on distractions and get on with it 🙂
Thank you for the advice both of my parents failed all or most of their GCSEs and I want to do well, but sitting to revise is just a cycle of me getting frustrated because it feels like a grandiose waste of time. Once I learn something, I just can't sit and relearn it.

I appreciate the kind words though, and I'll take into mind the idea of looking at my future. Thank you!

(Original post by University of Portsmouth Student Rep)
Hi!

this is completely normal. I've been told that you should work solidly for about 30 minutes then rest for ten. In this 10 minutes I usually go for a walk round the block, as exercise improves the function of the brain. Then go back to working afterwards. Remember rest is important!
In regards to memory, I use to make an A3 poster for each module in my subject with all the key points on and making it really colourful and coordinated.
I then try and memorise this poster and copy it from memory, but without all the colour and fancy bits. In a different coloured pen i then add what I had missed from memory.
Or I make plans of potential essay questions, which include all the key facts. Similarly i memorise this and try and copy it from memory. In a different coloured pen i then add what I had missed from memory, as a change in colour can be helpful for memory.


I hope this helps and good luck!
Chloe - Official Student Rep
Thank you for the advice! I'll be sure to give the thing with the different colours a try, as that's something I haven't tried before except for marking my work, and it sounds like it could be of use.

I don't know whether I just get frustrated and bored sitting down to study something I've already done or whether I'm just intimidated by the idea of how close my exams are, but it's a problem either way. I'd rather deal with it now than during exam week though, so thank you for the advice, I'll be sure to try it
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