CaptainDuckie
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Hi guys, I do chem,bio , maths/ predicted A*A*A
I need some help..

1) i was wondering how to utilise flashcards? :s

2) also, do I need to do extra research in order to maximise my understanding of the subjects so like would I need to use Wikipedia for biology etc? thanks
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Mesopotamian.
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1) The initial creation of flash cards is good for cementing a little extra information into your memory as it’ll be a form of repetition. In the long term you can re-read your flashcards, or test yourself e.g. ask yourself a question relevant to the flash card you’re holding and then see if you can remember the information you’ve written down. You can do this with friends too and make it into a small quiz.

2) No, extra reading is not necessary. It’s helpful if you need further clarification on a topic, but for the sake of passing your exams, it’s not vital. Everything you need should be in your specification and official exam board textbook.
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
1) The initial creation of flash cards is good for cementing a little extra information into your memory as it’ll be a form of repetition. In the long term you can re-read your flashcards, or test yourself e.g. ask yourself a question relevant to the flash card you’re holding and then see if you can remember the information you’ve written down. You can do this with friends too and make it into a small quiz.

2) No, extra reading is not necessary. It’s helpful if you need further clarification on a topic, but for the sake of passing your exams, it’s not vital. Everything you need should be in your specification and official exam board textbook.
1) what websites would you recommend for flashcards, did you use it? If so how did that go for you?

2) so if I memorised words from Wikipedia and also the textbook words, it holds no value?
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
1) what websites would you recommend for flashcards, did you use it? If so how did that go for you?

2) so if I memorised words from Wikipedia and also the textbook words, it holds no value?
1) Quizlet. I didn’t use online flash card resources though, I made them myself.

2) Memorising the textbook yes (although this is only applicable to biology and parts of chemistry, you need to understand maths and chemistry to do well). Memorising Wikipedia no...not sure why you’d want to do that. Wikipedia pages can be written by anyone, so it’s not the most reliable resource out there.
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
1) Quizlet. I didn’t use online flash card resources though, I made them myself.

2) Memorising the textbook yes (although this is only applicable to biology and parts of chemistry, you need to understand maths and chemistry to do well). Memorising Wikipedia no...not sure why you’d want to do that. Wikipedia pages can be written by anyone, so it’s not the most reliable resource out there.
1) I seen a lot of posts about Anki, is this good?

2) okay, so how much information should be on the back of the card, condensed notes or articulated paragraphs that you can retrieve from memory?
What resources would you say that’s reliable, for extra reading around the syllabus?
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yippy-yikes
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
1) I seen a lot of posts about Anki, is this good?

2) okay, so how much information should be on the back of the card, condensed notes or articulated paragraphs that you can retrieve from memory?
What resources would you say that’s reliable, for extra reading around the syllabus?
I use Anki and I really like it. The features can be a bit complicated at first but once you get used to it you'll realise how customisable it can be (especially the desktop version). Also I'm going to watch this thread as honestly I have no clue how much to put on the back of a flashcard either...
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by yippy-yikes)
I use Anki and I really like it. The features can be a bit complicated at first but once you get used to it you'll realise how customisable it can be (especially the desktop version). Also I'm going to watch this thread as honestly I have no clue how much to put on the back of a flashcard either...
Yeah me too lol, it’s really helpful but I want advice
Since he has an A* in biology so I want the ultimate secrets lol , please, you’re more than welcome to watch
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yippy-yikes
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
Yeah me too lol, it’s really helpful but I want advice
Since he has an A* in biology so I want the ultimate secrets lol , please, you’re more than welcome to watch
I see, yeah I will watch too then thank you! The content to go over in Biology is quite crazy ^^'
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by yippy-yikes)
I see, yeah I will watch too then thank you! The content to go over in Biology is quite crazy ^^'
Yeah I know lmao, all I’ve been doing is smashing it on flashcards and forcing myself to recall it, and then if I’m stuck on why something happens, I check Wikipedia but someone said it isn’t reliable lmao
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
1) I seen a lot of posts about Anki, is this good?

2) okay, so how much information should be on the back of the card, condensed notes or articulated paragraphs that you can retrieve from memory?
What resources would you say that’s reliable, for extra reading around the syllabus?
1) Yeah I know people who use Anki and they find it really helpful. I don’t use it though.

2) This is more up to your own learning style. I personally write quite a lot but I highlight/ write key words in different colours. However I know that my notes are actually pretty long compared to some people - they’ll have bullet points of words or phrases and that will be enough for them. It depends on what you prefer.
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
1) Yeah I know people who use Anki and they find it really helpful. I don’t use it though.

2) This is more up to your own learning style. I personally write quite a lot but I highlight/ write key words in different colourS. However I know that my notes are actually pretty long compared to some people - they’ll have bullet points of words or phrases and that will be enough for them. It depends on what you prefer.
1) ok thank you, don’t you feel like paper flashcards become clustered after a while? If not, how did you deal with it?

2) do you put the notes straight from the textbook or in your own words?
How often do you review it? What is your interval for the space repetition, since you have to do it on paper ?
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yippy-yikes
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
Yeah I know lmao, all I’ve been doing is smashing it on flashcards and forcing myself to recall it, and then if I’m stuck on why something happens, I check Wikipedia but someone said it isn’t reliable lmao
I see, I've been forcing myself to recall my knowledge out loud to my friends (which surprisingly helps me actually). I think I might give them a headache by the time we get to December though :lol:
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by yippy-yikes)
I see, I've been forcing myself to recall my knowledge out loud to my friends (which surprisingly helps me actually). I think I might give them a headache by the time we get to December though :lol:
Hahahaha that’s good!
Active recall is very good to force you to understand something, once you can explain it to someone then that means you know it
Lol by December 😂😂😂😂
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CurryCurry2468
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
Hi guys, I do chem,bio , maths/ predicted A*A*A
I need some help..

1) i was wondering how to utilise flashcards? :s

2) also, do I need to do extra research in order to maximise my understanding of the subjects so like would I need to use Wikipedia for biology etc? thanks
I mean i dont do bio or chem but i can give u advice for maths.

1. For maths u dont usually use flashcards but I do think it is beneficial when it comes to stats and mech. This is because there is those little facts and answers u just need to know for the exams. For example with mech, u need to know about modelling assumptions because every year at least 1 or 2 q's will have a part that asks about modelling assumptions. Also with projectiles, u need to know what to say when the q asks about refinements that should be made to a model. With stats flashcards will come in handy for the LDS (Large Data Set), little facts within each topic, sampling methods....

For pure I would say in year 1, learn the general technique for vector questions (especially comparing coefficients) and flashcards will come in handy for this. I would say for each topic create flashcards on the general technique for tackling problems within the topic. In year 2, there is some stuff u need to remember (dont know exaclty what).


2. In terms of wider research, I would say learn some derivations as they help deepen ur understanding of where certain things come from. For example, the derivation of small angle approximations, we can then use this to derive the taylor series (although taylor series is FM it is still interesting to learn about)
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
1) ok thank you, don’t you feel like paper flashcards become clustered after a while? If not, how did you deal with it?

2) do you put the notes straight from the textbook or in your own words?
How often do you review it? What is your interval for the space repetition, since you have to do it on paper ?
1) Not really, I actually prefer physical flashcards because I can actually see the amount of revision I’ve done and what else I need to do. I just store my flashcards in a designated area to avoid things becoming messy.

2) In my own words because that way I’ve processed the information. The recall interval depends on how much time I have to revise and how much time I need to do other stuff. Sometimes I use them on the journey to uni (in your case, school). Can you rephrase your last question please? I don’t quite understand what you mean.
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
1) Not really, I actually prefer physical flashcards because I can actually see the amount of revision I’ve done and what else I need to do. I just store my flashcards in a designated area to avoid things becoming messy.

2) In my own words because that way I’ve processed the information. The recall interval depends on how much time I have to revise and how much time I need to do other stuff. Sometimes I use them on the journey to uni (in your case, school). Can you rephrase your last question please? I don’t quite understand what you mean.
1) thank you, this section is now complete

2) so how do you know if it’s overdue for the review? Because active recall is a concept of testing yourself in a spaced interval so if you learnt a concept today, you’ll test yourself on questions 4 days later and then 10 days later. How do you know since there isn’t any “due” cards for physical flashcards, do you keep a track of the dates you completed it?
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by CurryCurry2468)
I mean i dont do bio or chem but i can give u advice for maths.

1. For maths u dont usually use flashcards but I do think it is beneficial when it comes to stats and mech. This is because there is those little facts and answers u just need to know for the exams. For example with mech, u need to know about modelling assumptions because every year at least 1 or 2 q's will have a part that asks about modelling assumptions. Also with projectiles, u need to know what to say when the q asks about refinements that should be made to a model. With stats flashcards will come in handy for the LDS (Large Data Set), little facts within each topic, sampling methods....

For pure I would say in year 1, learn the general technique for vector questions (especially comparing coefficients) and flashcards will come in handy for this. I would say for each topic create flashcards on the general technique for tackling problems within the topic. In year 2, there is some stuff u need to remember (dont know exaclty what).


2. In terms of wider research, I would say learn some derivations as they help deepen ur understanding of where certain things come from. For example, the derivation of small angle approximations, we can then use this to derive the taylor series (although taylor series is FM it is still interesting to learn about)
1. Thank you

2. Thanks, I use external YouTube videos for maths so I boost my understandings!
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
1) thank you, this section is now complete

2) so how do you know if it’s overdue for the review? Because active recall is a concept of testing yourself in a spaced interval so if you learnt a concept today, you’ll test yourself on questions 4 days later and then 10 days later. How do you know since there isn’t any “due” cards for physical flashcards, do you keep a track of the dates you completed it?
1) :yy:
2) To be completely honest with you, what you’ve just described to me is new info. I don’t follow some set recall format, I just roll with it. I suppose if you want to have a rigid method like that, you could just record your intervals on a word doc or other piece of paper or something. I used flashcards but most of my revision was past papers - including biology which is more content heavy.
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CaptainDuckie
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(Original post by Mesopotamian.)
1) :yy:
2) To be completely honest with you, what you’ve just described to me is new info. I don’t follow some set recall format, I just roll with it. I suppose if you want to have a rigid method like that, you could just record your intervals on a word doc or other piece of paper or something. I used flashcards but most of my revision was past papers - including biology which is more content heavy.
2) ahhhh, okay, lmao so you’re just a go with the flow type of person lol. Yeah because here’s this study called the “forgetting curve” basically by testing yourself in an interval-led fashion can actually boost your memory in that topic, there’s been scientific studies to show it is effective.
So from past papers then, you’d attempt the questions, what about the questions you got wrong, do you like put it on a flashcard?
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Mesopotamian.
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(Original post by CaptainDuckie)
2) ahhhh, okay, lmao so you’re just a go with the flow type of person lol. Yeah because here’s this study called the “forgetting curve” basically by testing yourself in an interval-led fashion can actually boost your memory in that topic, there’s been scientific studies to show it is effective.
So from past papers then, you’d attempt the questions, what about the questions you got wrong, do you like put it on a flashcard?
2) Yeah I agree with your study, the more recall you do the better you remember things, I just didn’t really have time for that. My method for past paper questions was quite a unique and wacky one, I’ve never heard of anyone else doing what I did so it’d probably be pointless describing it
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