tgoldberg
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
hii
can anyone help me write a good 24 marker that will get me top marks? like any tips and how to structure it?
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Izaariak12
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#2
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(Original post by tgoldberg)
hii
can anyone help me write a good 24 marker that will get me top marks? like any tips and how to structure it?
I can try but I must warn you that I might not be of great help. I am currently studying A levels which do not include history but I can still give it a go
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tgoldberg
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#3
(Original post by Izaariak12)
I can try but I must warn you that I might not be of great help. I am currently studying A levels which do not include history but I can still give it a go
thank you so much (i had written this before i learnt about the glorious revolution and onwards btw) also sorry i just saw this

‘In the period c1000 - c1800 the main cause of tension between rulers and their subjects was taxation’. How far do you agree with this view? (24)

In the period c1000 - c1800, taxation was a major cause of tension between rulers and subjects - the kings could often lack balance between compromise and force and overtax the people, causing rising tension and dislike towards the ruler from their subjects. However, there are also other factors that caused tension between rulers and their subjects, such as opposition from the church, disagreements over religion and disputes with the barons over wars and power.

I agree that taxation was one main cause of tension between rulers and their subjects. For example, King John, who ruled from 1199 - 1216, faced harsh opposition and dislike from the barons. One main reason he faced this opposition was because he taxed them too much for his wars overseas, like winning back Normandy from the French. This overtaxation on the barons portrayed his inability to balance compromise with force, as he took any opportunity to seize the money he needed from the barons and leave them helpless like he did to Matilda de Braose, who he accused her baron husband of murdering his nephew without trial and ordered them to pay him £25,000. This overtaxation was the main cause to the rise of the Magna Carta, which was a series of concessions made by the barons do decrease the power of the king and make the king subject to the law - this was an example of how the tension between the barons and the king escalated to the barons having to take action against his overtaxations and it was re-introduced to prevent problems like this from happening again. Another example of taxation being the main cause of tension between rulers and their subjects was in Charles i’s rule in the early 1600s. He was a greatly disliked ruler by his subjects because of his habit to constantly dissolve parliament, his religious catholic views and most importantly his heavy taxation. During his ‘personal rule’ from 1629-40, he introduced a new way of demanding money without asking parliament - he introduced Ship Money, which was a tax that was meant to be introduced in a situation of war, and he placed ‘knighthood fines’’ on wealthy landowners. These taxes caused many people, especially puritans, to protest against the king. This tension that grew mainly due to Charles’ overtaxation developed into two civil wars and eventually to Charles’ execution when he refused to change. This was significant as the people had also believed in the divine right of kings, so the last thing they wanted to do was get rid of the ‘rightful’ king, but this showed the extremity of the tensions that rose due to Charles’ forceful taxations that left the people with no choice. One last example of taxation being the main cause of increasing tensions was when the people rose up against Richard II due to his harsh taxation to pay for the war against france. This taxation showed his inability to also not balance force with compromise, and it triggered the peasant’s revolt. As more important men and people living in London joined, the revolt grew and Richard seemed even more threatened by this rebellion as the tensions rose. This revolt which was triggered by his overtaxation showed how taxations was a major cause of tension between a ruler and his subjects as it left the people with no money as well as no power, and showed the people that kings could abuse their power and take from them unfairly.

However, i also disagree with this statement as there were many other factors, some even more significant than taxation, that caused the tension between rulers and their subjects. One thing that caused this tension was the disagreements between the barons and the kings over issues such as taxation (but not taxation itself) and appointing a leader. For example, during Richard i’s rule in the late 1300s, the barons fell out with him and organised the peasant’s revolt when they disagreed over who should be chancellor - Richard wanted de la Pole to be, but the barons disagreed. Among the rebelling barons was Henry Bolingbroke, who was crowned Henry iv after Richard was defeated and imprisoned. This shows that one simple disagreement could increase the tension between a ruler and their subjects which could then lead to an overthrow or threat to power. The Church and religion was also a powerful factor from the medieval period until the Glorious Revolution. During the Norman rule and even before that, the Church had been an extremely powerful influence on the people as well as the king. They were even able to make William the Conqueror, one of the most powerful rulers in history, built a church to repent for his killings. A famous example of where tension rose between the church and the king was during the dispute between Henry ii and Becket, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Becket proved to be more loyal to the church than to the king, and so a series of trying to eliminate each other’s support led to Becket’s murder. Although Henry apparently didn't intend on this to happen, it had a serious effect on his reputation and name. He was also forced to go through a series of humiliating consequences such as being whipped barefoot by monks. This showed that tensions between the king and his people were caused by the power of the church, as everyone looked up to the church and so he would be disrespected if anything happened to one of the churchmen. If a ruler and his subjects disagreed over religion or whether to make the country catholic or protestant, this could instantly raise tension. For example, during Elizabeth i’s rule, her main problem was over making the country Catholic or Protestant. She chose to restore protestantism in England, but not everyone agreed with her. As well as receiving threats from abroad such as Spain and France who were Catholic, Elizabeth saw Catholics from among her own subjects rise against her - the Northern rebellion that took place by her leading Nobles to put Mary , Elizabeth’s Catholic sister, on the throne. Although this rebellion failed, it still portrayed how the tension from religious disagreement from many subjects had led Elizabeth to feel insecure in her position as queen. Another example of Religion being a major factor to increasing tensions between rulers and their subjects was during the reign of James ii. His conversion and sympathy towards Catholics and Catholicism raised criticism from almost everyone in England - the protestant people, the powerful Nobles and even MPs and parliament. This led to their appeal to William of Orange, who was married to James’ daughter, Mary. when they invaded and seized the throne from James as the people asked, they made a rule in the Bill of Rights that the monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland had to be Protestant. The fact that the people had to ask a prince of another country to come and overthrow their king over the side of Christianity he chose shows how tensions rose between rulers and their monarchs due to religion, even when many of them still believed in the idea that G-d appointed the king.

In conclusion, I disagree with this statement. Although taxation did cause a major rise in tension between a ruler and their monarchs, such as John’s taxation on the barons led to the Magna Carta being introduced and Charles i’s ship money being forced on the people leading to his execution, there were many other factors that raised tensions even more, such as disagreements between the king and the barons like when Richard and the barons fell out which led to a baron rebellion to form and overthrow Richard. Religion was also a major cause of tension, especially during Elizabeth’s rule, who was a strong ruler but only mainly struggled with religious threats, and James being overthrown due to his sympathy towards Catholics.
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