#anonymous_user
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Hi,
I hope whoever’s reading this is okay. I was just wondering if anyone has any recourses/tips for An Inspector Calls, or language paper 1 (aqa) that they don’t mind sharing. Especially if they’re character profiles/ themes for AIC, that would be very helpful.
Also if anyone has any any advice on how to answer paper 1 language questions, especially the “to what extent do you agree” and the structure one, that would be really kind. And the creative writing - I don’t know how to do this one at all lol (tips on this would be very very appreciated.)
Thank you so much and im sorry for all the trouble
0
reply
A.Peters0797
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
(Original post by #anonymous_user)
Hi,
I hope whoever’s reading this is okay. I was just wondering if anyone has any recourses/tips for An Inspector Calls, or language paper 1 (aqa) that they don’t mind sharing. Especially if they’re character profiles/ themes for AIC, that would be very helpful.
Also if anyone has any any advice on how to answer paper 1 language questions, especially the “to what extent do you agree” and the structure one, that would be really kind. And the creative writing - I don’t know how to do this one at all lol (tips on this would be very very appreciated.)
Thank you so much and im sorry for all the trouble
Character Profiles and Themes:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guide...cdm/revision/1
https://www.sparknotes.com/drama/an-...ls/characters/

Could you give me an exact example of the questions you need help with? I'd love to help but I'm not sure which ones you mean
0
reply
#anonymous_user
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by A.Peters0797)
Character Profiles and Themes:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guide...cdm/revision/1
https://www.sparknotes.com/drama/an-...ls/characters/

Could you give me an exact example of the questions you need help with? I'd love to help but I'm not sure which ones you mean
Hi, thanks so much! Tbh, I’ve not got a specific question for AIC that I’m struggling with atm, but is it okay if I send u one I might need help with if I come across one? Only if you don’t mind tho.

For the English language paper, I’m more stuck on question 4 and 5, about how I should structure them to get maximum marks. I really struggle with creative writing, so any tips will help a lot
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/sample-...P-NOV17-CR.PDF
Thank you so much for your time, I really really appreciate it! Thank you!
0
reply
A.Peters0797
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#4
Report 4 weeks ago
#4
(Original post by #anonymous_user)
Hi, thanks so much! Tbh, I’ve not got a specific question for AIC that I’m struggling with atm, but is it okay if I send u one I might need help with if I come across one? Only if you don’t mind tho.

For the English language paper, I’m more stuck on question 4 and 5, about how I should structure them to get maximum marks. I really struggle with creative writing, so any tips will help a lot
https://filestore.aqa.org.uk/sample-...P-NOV17-CR.PDF
Thank you so much for your time, I really really appreciate it! Thank you!
No problem, just quote me on this thread and I'd love to - I loved GCSE English Lit so it takes me back to the good ol' days haha

Question 4

I would advise picking the reader's statement apart and note down your thought process. Consider:

Alice continues to dig - does it say how difficult the digging process had been, how long it took to do it? etc
What is the 'object'?
Why does the reader think the object is 'very mysterious'
What makes the reader think that the discovery may be life-changing?

Although this question asks you to 'focus on the second part of the source', I feel that it's important to start your answer (the introduction) with some context of what happened in the first part of the text so that you can fully explain some reasons why you agree/disagree with the reader later in the answer.

After you've written your intro, structure each paragraph making a point using the evidence above to justify your answer, so that you cover each bullet point.

In reality, I've realised that, essentially, the examiner won't really care what your opinion is, they just want to see how you analyse the text from a reader's perspective, and summarise how the writer encourages you to feel a certain way, whether a text is mysterious, whether it's written to make you laugh, etc. Make sure you counter balance your analysis where possible, and analyse it in as much detail as possible rather than just feature spotting your way through it, and describe why the point made this particular reader feel this particular way

Let me know if you have any questions about this, and feel free to send me your answer if you need someone to check it for you (I have an English degree so I like to think I'm qualified enough haha! )

Question 5

Wow these questions are interesting, can't say I remember this sort of question when I was at school!

I find it interesting that at the head of the page it says 'you are reminded of the need to plan your answer' - it seems like a question you'd get in maths, where they award you points for your thought process, and not just the answer you have at the end, so make sure that you write your plan down in a tidy and reasonable way!

I would suggest using a mind-map and title it with either 'photo' or 'discovery' in the centre

For the photo, consider:
Who is the 'protagonist/main character'? Is the story based on the person in the photo? Who is he/she? And why is he/she there? What do they look like (the audience can't see the face of the individual so be as creative as you like!)
I advise that the story is set in the mountains
Is there something in the water?
What is the weather like? Pretty gloomy - maybe use the weather to create a dark/mysterious atmosphere (foreshadowing is usually a thing in creative writing)

You will need to also think about what's going to happen in the story, or the 'narrative structure.' Base your structure on something like this:
Introduce characters and the setting
The plot
Plot twists/conflict
Resolution/cliff hangers

As for the 'Discovery' question, write down a definition for the word in as much detail as possible and pick this apart.
Google is the opposite of helpful here:
'the action or process of discovering or being discovered'
So think about what is going to be discovered in your story
How will it be discovered and by who?
Where will it be found? etc

Again, if you have any questions please let me know
2
reply
#anonymous_user
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by A.Peters0797)
No problem, just quote me on this thread and I'd love to - I loved GCSE English Lit so it takes me back to the good ol' days haha

Question 4

I would advise picking the reader's statement apart and note down your thought process. Consider:

Alice continues to dig - does it say how difficult the digging process had been, how long it took to do it? etc
What is the 'object'?
Why does the reader think the object is 'very mysterious'
What makes the reader think that the discovery may be life-changing?

Although this question asks you to 'focus on the second part of the source', I feel that it's important to start your answer (the introduction) with some context of what happened in the first part of the text so that you can fully explain some reasons why you agree/disagree with the reader later in the answer.

After you've written your intro, structure each paragraph making a point using the evidence above to justify your answer, so that you cover each bullet point.

In reality, I've realised that, essentially, the examiner won't really care what your opinion is, they just want to see how you analyse the text from a reader's perspective, and summarise how the writer encourages you to feel a certain way, whether a text is mysterious, whether it's written to make you laugh, etc. Make sure you counter balance your analysis where possible, and analyse it in as much detail as possible rather than just feature spotting your way through it, and describe why the point made this particular reader feel this particular way

Let me know if you have any questions about this, and feel free to send me your answer if you need someone to check it for you (I have an English degree so I like to think I'm qualified enough haha! )

Question 5

Wow these questions are interesting, can't say I remember this sort of question when I was at school!

I find it interesting that at the head of the page it says 'you are reminded of the need to plan your answer' - it seems like a question you'd get in maths, where they award you points for your thought process, and not just the answer you have at the end, so make sure that you write your plan down in a tidy and reasonable way!

I would suggest using a mind-map and title it with either 'photo' or 'discovery' in the centre

For the photo, consider:
Who is the 'protagonist/main character'? Is the story based on the person in the photo? Who is he/she? And why is he/she there? What do they look like (the audience can't see the face of the individual so be as creative as you like!)
I advise that the story is set in the mountains
Is there something in the water?
What is the weather like? Pretty gloomy - maybe use the weather to create a dark/mysterious atmosphere (foreshadowing is usually a thing in creative writing)

You will need to also think about what's going to happen in the story, or the 'narrative structure.' Base your structure on something like this:
Introduce characters and the setting
The plot
Plot twists/conflict
Resolution/cliff hangers

As for the 'Discovery' question, write down a definition for the word in as much detail as possible and pick this apart.
Google is the opposite of helpful here:
'the action or process of discovering or being discovered'
So think about what is going to be discovered in your story
How will it be discovered and by who?
Where will it be found? etc

Again, if you have any questions please let me know
Thank you, thank you, thank you so much!!! You are amazing! I really appreciate your help!
For question 4, how do you efficiently articulate what the reader feels? I feel like I always say, for eg, that the writer uses a question to engage the reader. How do I expand on this, do you have any advice for this?
For question 5, I genuinely can’t thank you enough! Like I’m normally quite crappy at creative writing, icl, so this helped a massive amount! I’ll definitely try to apply your advice when I do the question
And lol yes, the questions are quite thought provocative imo and tough sometimes, definitely a bit like maths where we are given credit for thought process. I actually find it a bit funny they remind us to plan, but hey, it is what it isss!

Anyways, thank you so much you amazing person! This was so helpful!
Last edited by #anonymous_user; 4 weeks ago
0
reply
A.Peters0797
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by #anonymous_user)
Thank you, thank you, thank you so much!!! You are amazing! I really appreciate your help!
For question 4, how do you efficiently articulate what the reader feels? I feel like I always say, for eg, that the writer uses a question to engage the reader. How do I expand on this, do you have any advice for this?
For question 5, I genuinely can’t thank you enough! Like I’m normally quite crappy at creative writing, icl, so this helped a massive amount! I’ll definitely try to apply your advice when I do the question
And lol yes, the questions are quite thought provocative imo and tough sometimes, definitely a bit like maths where we are given credit for thought process. I actually find it a bit funny they remind us to plan, but hey, it is what it isss!

Anyways, thank you so much you amazing person! This was so helpful!
Aww you're very welcome I'm glad I could help!

There are a couple of ways to articulate how the reader feels. First, you could write your point of what makes the reader feel a certain way, which you've done by saying 'the writer uses a (rhetorical?) question to engage the reader.' In this point you would need to embed the evidence, or the example/s that you've found of the author asking a question. Then you can explain how and why it is used to engage the reader in this example, so is it used to encourage the reader to think of an answer to something they may not have otherwise considered? Is it used for dramatic effect and how? Is it a question that has an obvious answer, or is it quite thought provoking, and how?

To 'mix up' your sentence structure, you could try writing your theory first by saying something along the lines of:
'Writers use rhetorical questions in literary texts to either create a dramatic effect and engage the reader. In this text, the author asks the question: '_______?', which encourages the reader to ____.'
If you need any more help on this could you include the source in your post so I know exactly what they say to help in a more specific way if this doesn't make sense haha!

Question 5 is certainly a different one, yeah! It's just all about taking inspiration from an image by using analysis, really. Essentially as long as you write a half decent story with some literary technique you'll be fine Again, let me know if you need help on any other questions. Not sure how quick I can respond over the weekend but I'll have an answer by Monday, at least!
0
reply
#anonymous_user
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#7
Report Thread starter 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by A.Peters0797)
Aww you're very welcome I'm glad I could help!

There are a couple of ways to articulate how the reader feels. First, you could write your point of what makes the reader feel a certain way, which you've done by saying 'the writer uses a (rhetorical?) question to engage the reader.' In this point you would need to embed the evidence, or the example/s that you've found of the author asking a question. Then you can explain how and why it is used to engage the reader in this example, so is it used to encourage the reader to think of an answer to something they may not have otherwise considered? Is it used for dramatic effect and how? Is it a question that has an obvious answer, or is it quite thought provoking, and how?

To 'mix up' your sentence structure, you could try writing your theory first by saying something along the lines of:
'Writers use rhetorical questions in literary texts to either create a dramatic effect and engage the reader. In this text, the author asks the question: '_______?', which encourages the reader to ____.'
If you need any more help on this could you include the source in your post so I know exactly what they say to help in a more specific way if this doesn't make sense haha!

Question 5 is certainly a different one, yeah! It's just all about taking inspiration from an image by using analysis, really. Essentially as long as you write a half decent story with some literary technique you'll be fine Again, let me know if you need help on any other questions. Not sure how quick I can respond over the weekend but I'll have an answer by Monday, at least!
Ahhh okay thanks so much! This helped a lot, thanks!
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Are you travelling in the Uni student travel window (3-9 Dec) to go home for Christmas?

Yes (73)
27.76%
No - I have already returned home (30)
11.41%
No - I plan on travelling outside these dates (54)
20.53%
No - I'm staying at my term time address over Christmas (28)
10.65%
No - I live at home during term anyway (78)
29.66%

Watched Threads

View All