Vicki23031980
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Hi

I’ve just joined the Civil Service as an EO in the Home Office. My pay band is £24,100-£27,236.

As an external applicant my pay is currently at the bottom of the pay band at £24,100.

How do you progress through the band to reach the higher salary of £27,236? Is it through annual increase (general inflation) and if so how much roughly does it increase each year? And how long until you reach the highest salary?

Thanks!
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rebecca_:)
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(Original post by Vicki23031980)
Hi

I’ve just joined the Civil Service as an EO in the Home Office. My pay band is £24,100-£27,236.

As an external applicant my pay is currently at the bottom of the pay band at £24,100.

How do you progress through the band to reach the higher salary of £27,236? Is it through annual increase (general inflation) and if so how much roughly does it increase each year? And how long until you reach the highest salary?

Thanks!
I’m not sure what the Home Office is like, but in HMRC I started on the minimum 4 years ago and still on the minimum, the minimum rises the same rate that usual inflation rises.

As far as I’m aware you don’t get contracted salary increases based on performed or length of time served.
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TheDE
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In the DVSA the system is too complicated, but the pay range increases every year at 1.5% for the minimum and 1% for the maximum. occasionally the mandarins above decide we deserve an extra .5% on top of our basic rise which takes everyone currently employed above the minimum pay range, with new employees still on the minimum for the pay range. This extra raise happened last year for the first time in 10 years. When you reach the top of the pay range any pay raise on top of the 1% comes as a bonus.

So if you were on the maximum of £27,236 and the pay was raised by 2%, your end of year pay would be £27,508 (1%) with a bonus payment of £272.36 (1%), only getting an actual 1% pay raise.

Those on minimum pay would get the full 2% as a pay raise, earning £24,582 and be 0.5% above the new minimum of £24,461.

The mandarins pat themselves on the back and give themselves a pay raise of normally double anyone below an HEO grade, despite already earning 2-3x our pay. They must need the money... 🙄

Anything above the *below inflation* minimum raise is very rare.
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Vicki23031980
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(Original post by rebecca_:))
I’m not sure what the Home Office is like, but in HMRC I started on the minimum 4 years ago and still on the minimum, the minimum rises the same rate that usual inflation rises.

As far as I’m aware you don’t get contracted salary increases based on performed or length of time served.
Thank you for your reply :-)

So just to clarify, let’s say for arguments sake your minimum salary 4 years ago was £24,100 are you saying you are still receiving that same salary from 4 years ago?

Or do you mean the minimum salary has now increased over the four years to what you receive now? So the minimum has increased but so has the maximum and you still receive the lower of the two?
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rebecca_:)
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(Original post by Vicki23031980)
Thank you for your reply :-)

So just to clarify, let’s say for arguments sake your minimum salary 4 years ago was £24,100 are you saying you are still receiving that same salary from 4 years ago?

Or do you mean the minimum salary has now increased over the four years to what you receive now? So the minimum has increased but so has the maximum and you still receive the lower of the two?
Yeah I think I started on around 23,800? And I’m on 24818 now? So whenever you got the 1-2% raise each year, the minimum also gets increased by the same rate. So new starters get the same salary that you get.
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Vicki23031980
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(Original post by TheDE)
In the DVSA the system is too complicated, but the pay range increases every year at 1.5% for the minimum and 1% for the maximum. occasionally the mandarins above decide we deserve an extra .5% on top of our basic rise which takes everyone currently employed above the minimum pay range, with new employees still on the minimum for the pay range. This extra raise happened last year for the first time in 10 years. When you reach the top of the pay range any pay raise on top of the 1% comes as a bonus.

So if you were on the maximum of £27,236 and the pay was raised by 2%, your end of year pay would be £27,508 (1%) with a bonus payment of £272.36 (1%), only getting an actual 1% pay raise.

Those on minimum pay would get the full 2% as a pay raise, earning £24,582 and be 0.5% above the new minimum of £24,461.

The mandarins pat themselves on the back and give themselves a pay raise of normally double anyone below an HEO grade, despite already earning 2-3x our pay. They must need the money... 🙄

Anything above the *below inflation* minimum raise is very rare.
Thank you for your detailed reply.

Oh yes it’s all very confusing in the civil service! I guess il just keep my fingers crossed.
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Vicki23031980
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(Original post by rebecca_:))
Yeah I think I started on around 23,800? And I’m on 24818 now? So whenever you got the 1-2% raise each year, the minimum also gets increased by the same rate. So new starters get the same salary that you get.
Ah right ok I understand.

Thank you for taking the time to reply 😊
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Vexper
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You will likely retire before you hit maximum band as the goal posts move year to year and as a new entrant you get the min side of the band and pay awards agreed between the treasury and the department ranges between 1% to 2.5% uplift. As you can imagine, one of the key reasons people move so often in the Civil Service is due to promoting to a higher grade being the only realistic way of gaining a decent salary uplift.

Compare this to say a police officer - they can remain in the same capacity but in 5 years they gain 12k+ overall on their salary. As an EO in the Home Office, you are looking nowhere near such a figure. If money is a motivator, look to move to HEO ASAP and embrace any progression/development opportunities.
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TheDE
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The pay range for DVSA is also much much narrower than most agencies, it is currently £26,126 - £26,778 for EO grade, due to the range being so slim I’m currently on £26,470 despite only working there for 1.5 years! And my initial salary was £25,259 so you can progress quickly if the agency is nice to the EO’s! We are getting 2.7% this year, a record pay raise! So 4.7% in 2 years, bear in mind there was a 10 year pay freeze previous to this.
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