Jason03
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Hello, all I have been deliberating which career path to take and thus what I should start with supercuriccular work towards.

History - I have always thoroughly enjoyed this subject, doing outside curriculum work and reading since Y2, and it was always my passion to do a history degree at Cambridge. The chances of getting into a course like this at Oxbridge are over 2x higher than that of economics of pure statistics and may perhaps constitute more work.
However, if I decided to take history at uni, I would be able to drop further maths (even though the average Oxbridge applicant has 4 a-levels I believe 3 a levels is fine for history? Does anyone know?) and take an EPQ instead as allocating more time to supercurricular work.
From a career path, It seems that history still has plenty of options, such as graduate schemes of area management or a law conversion, which both interest me more than investment banking that would sprout from economics, however, are these fields harder to get into for better jobs with only a history degree?
Also, I got 9's in all my GCSE's minus english literature which I only got a 6, I assume if I wanted to go through this path and take history I would have to retake this as it is linked to history, or because of what I believe to be an unfair prediction and the whole coronavirus situation, is it likely they wouldn't particularly be bothered.

Economics - I am aware this is a much stronger degree for prospects, but also much more competitive, with further maths being a necessity as well as a* in math and fm to get into most top universities - the problem I face really is that as I am not taking economics as an a-level as my college don't allow it, I struggle to do supercurricular work, in which I am currently reading 'This Changes Everything' and once finished will read 'The Green New Deal', the book 'Freakonomics' was relatively boring and I could definitely not write about that in my PS.

TLDR: How much worse is history for job prospects and is it really that much easier - can I drop further maths and do 3 a-levels and still have a decent chance of getting into Oxbridge.
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Ccccccxc
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I would pick history if I were you. I think deep down you don’t really like economics, I think you would just tolerate it. After history u could go into law or i banking if u want.
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Jason03
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(Original post by Ccccccxc)
I would pick history if I were you. I think deep down you don’t really like economics, I think you would just tolerate it. After history u could go into law or i banking if u want.
I guess its more so, how much weaker history is, vs also how damaging only getting a 6 in english lit is on my chances of getting into somewhere like oxbridge - as well as perhaps dropping further maths and doing an epq for history?
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Uni of Hull Students
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(Original post by Jason03)
Hello, all I have been deliberating which career path to take and thus what I should start with supercuriccular work towards.

History - I have always thoroughly enjoyed this subject, doing outside curriculum work and reading since Y2, and it was always my passion to do a history degree at Cambridge. The chances of getting into a course like this at Oxbridge are over 2x higher than that of economics of pure statistics and may perhaps constitute more work.
However, if I decided to take history at uni, I would be able to drop further maths (even though the average Oxbridge applicant has 4 a-levels I believe 3 a levels is fine for history? Does anyone know?) and take an EPQ instead as allocating more time to supercurricular work.
From a career path, It seems that history still has plenty of options, such as graduate schemes of area management or a law conversion, which both interest me more than investment banking that would sprout from economics, however, are these fields harder to get into for better jobs with only a history degree?
Also, I got 9's in all my GCSE's minus english literature which I only got a 6, I assume if I wanted to go through this path and take history I would have to retake this as it is linked to history, or because of what I believe to be an unfair prediction and the whole coronavirus situation, is it likely they wouldn't particularly be bothered.

Economics - I am aware this is a much stronger degree for prospects, but also much more competitive, with further maths being a necessity as well as a* in math and fm to get into most top universities - the problem I face really is that as I am not taking economics as an a-level as my college don't allow it, I struggle to do supercurricular work, in which I am currently reading 'This Changes Everything' and once finished will read 'The Green New Deal', the book 'Freakonomics' was relatively boring and I could definitely not write about that in my PS.

TLDR: How much worse is history for job prospects and is it really that much easier - can I drop further maths and do 3 a-levels and still have a decent chance of getting into Oxbridge.
HI Jason03

It is great that you are considering studying one of these two subjects.

My advice when deciding which to study, is not only considering the career which you would like to study but also which do you enjoy?
You are going to study this subject for a minimum of 3 years, and so I would argue that it is important that you enjoy the degree which you study. Unless you have a set career path, consider whether that career path has set requirements.
Both degrees have a range of career prospects which they lead to.
Economics can lead to careers such as Economist, Data analyst, Financial risk analyst, Investment analyst & Statistician. Further details for some other options can be found on our website.
History can lead to careers such as Researcher, Teacher, Civil servant, Historian, Archaeologist, Museum or gallery conservator, Auctioneer, Heritage management & Archivist.

The beauty of History is that it has subdisciplines such as economic history. If you are unsure as to whether this would be of interest I would look into seeing whether you can access articles from The Economic History Review as this is a nice way of incorporating both areas of interest. But If this is an area of interest, I would look at the specialisms of the different departments of universities which you consider applying for.

In regards to entry requirements, each university will state their requirements and if you are unsure, I would advise contacting the admissions of that university as the admissions staff will be in the best position to advise you.
The majority of applicants for universities have UCAS points from either 3 A-Levels or from a BTEC Level 3 extended diploma.

I hope that this is of some help, and if you have any questions please ask

Emily
University of Hull Student Representative
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