OnlySophie!
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Theoretically speaking. If I had a Degree in Education Psychology and an A-Level in Mathematics, would I be able to go onto doing a PGCE Secondary Maths?
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tinygirl96
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by OnlySophie!)
Theoretically speaking. If I had a Degree in Education Psychology and an A-Level in Mathematics, would I be able to go onto doing a PGCE Secondary Maths?
TIA
You will have to look at requirements for specific providers, as it will vary.

What grade did you get in A-level? I know that my training provider only required a B at A-level maths and commitment to complete an SKE course, however I've heard about funding cuts on SKE, so that may be less of an option now, I'm not sure.

I will say that on my course, there were 6 of us training specifically for maths, and of the four who didn't a maths-related degree, only two ended up completing the course and only one of those two stayed in teaching after their NQT year. Being a maths teacher means you need to be very keen on maths, you have to have a real interest or you'll get burned out. Why are you keen to teach maths and not another subject?
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by OnlySophie!)
Theoretically speaking. If I had a Degree in Education Psychology and an A-Level in Mathematics, would I be able to go onto doing a PGCE Secondary Maths?
TIA
Potentially yes, if it's a good A-level. As has been said though, funding for SKE courses has been reduced, so you may need to self fund an SKE. You'd also need to demonstrate a good level of maths knowledge at interview.

If you intend to teach long term, this may also hold you back, as it would probably limit you from doing A-level teaching etc.

That said, many schools are just happy to have a warm body to stick in front of a maths class, these days.
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OnlySophie!
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
You will have to look at requirements for specific providers, as it will vary.

What grade did you get in A-level? I know that my training provider only required a B at A-level maths and commitment to complete an SKE course, however I've heard about funding cuts on SKE, so that may be less of an option now, I'm not sure.

I will say that on my course, there were 6 of us training specifically for maths, and of the four who didn't a maths-related degree, only two ended up completing the course and only one of those two stayed in teaching after their NQT year. Being a maths teacher means you need to be very keen on maths, you have to have a real interest or you'll get burned out. Why are you keen to teach maths and not another subject?
I achieved a B at Alevel. If I would need to fund the SKE myself it wouldn't be an issue. The reason for choosing Maths over any other subject is because throughout school and college it was the main subject I did well in, on top of that it was the only subject I felt i could really engage with and enjoyed.
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by OnlySophie!)
I achieved a B at Alevel. If I would need to fund the SKE myself it wouldn't be an issue. The reason for choosing Maths over any other subject is because throughout school and college it was the main subject I did well in, on top of that it was the only subject I felt i could really engage with and enjoyed.
That’s good. I would expect to potentially be asked at interview why you’ve done a non-mathematical degree and what’s changed since then that makes you keen to do maths. If you’ve continued to pursue your interest in maths in your free time - through reading, societies, or optional uni modules - that’s something you can talk about at interview too.

A word of warning I would give you is that a B in A-level maths might mean that you will struggle with teaching high-ability classes, even with an SKE course. I know that on my training course, there was a girl who had a B at A-level and ended up struggling a lot with a top set GCSE class before she eventually dropped out.
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SarcAndSpark
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(Original post by OnlySophie!)
I achieved a B at Alevel. If I would need to fund the SKE myself it wouldn't be an issue. The reason for choosing Maths over any other subject is because throughout school and college it was the main subject I did well in, on top of that it was the only subject I felt i could really engage with and enjoyed.
I'd definitely talk to training providers prior to applying, to check how they would view your application. For some, a B at A-level and an unrelated degree may not be sufficient.
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