Tobez
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Hi, I'm a 17-year-old from the UK who is looking to moving out to the US permanently for many reasons, including job opportunities, quality of life, and the fact that I've always loved America. I want to study at university there too (I know roughly what I want to study and have an idea of what I want to do as a job), I was thinking that this could also be a stepping stone into possibly getting permanent residency. What are the chances that I will even get citizenship and what can I do to help myself get it.
Last edited by Tobez; 4 weeks ago
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ColtTheWolf
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I don't want to be a killjoy, but it would be very difficult financially for you unless your parents are able to. Even then, at 17 you don't have any qualifications, so the US won't allow you to just move there, as you cant provide anything of value to their system (Sounds harsh, I know!)

For now, focus on getting your education.

University will also cost you a LOT in the US, as you won't get loans. I suggest you first go to university in the UK and go into a field that's in demand in the US. My friend is a software engineer, and it's been difficult for him to get in.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by ColtTheWolf)
I don't want to be a killjoy, but it would be very difficult financially for you unless your parents are able to. Even then, at 17 you don't have any qualifications, so the US won't allow you to just move there, as you cant provide anything of value to their system (Sounds harsh, I know!)

For now, focus on getting your education.

University will also cost you a LOT in the US, as you won't get loans. I suggest you first go to university in the UK and go into a field that's in demand in the US. My friend is a software engineer, and it's been difficult for him to get in.
Some US colleges offer need-based financial aid for students who can't afford to attend college.

But yeah... it's really too early to think about Citizenship. Firstly, you'd have to have some kind of qualification or skill for them to let you into the US in the first place (usually on a work visa - a student visa won't do for this because of requirements). You'll then need to get a green card to become a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR). The most common ways of obtaining this are marrying an American, or living in the country for a certain amount of time. You must then apply and take a test for citizenship. It's a multi-year process.

Disclaimer: I'm not an expert on any of this, but I have looked into it for myself. This is the information as I understand it, though it could be incorrect. Do your own research too.
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ColtTheWolf
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
Some US colleges offer need-based financial aid for students who can't afford to attend college.

But yeah... it's really too early to think about Citizenship. Firstly, you'd have to have some kind of qualification or skill for them to let you into the US in the first place (usually on a work visa - a student visa won't do for this because of requirements). You'll then need to get a green card to become a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR). The most common ways of obtaining this are marrying an American, or living in the country for a certain amount of time. You must then apply and take a test for citizenship. It's a multi-year process.

Disclaimer: I'm not an expert on any of this, but I have looked into it for myself. This is the information as I understand it, though it could be incorrect. Do your own research too.
You're pretty accurate, honestly. I would say it's going to be impossible to move before uni is finished as they only give visas to people who can invest large sums of money into their country, highly skilled workers, and a few other criteria that I don't believe you fit.

I'm going into a medical degree and have been looking at writing my USMLE step 1 and what it entails to move to the US after I've finished my degree and done the step 1 and 2 ect, and it's a lot of work and money.

I feel bad to say it lol... but unless your parents have a LOT of money, it's pretty much not happening before you get a degree that's high in demand.

Wow, it sounds ****ing soul crushing. Was to me when I looked up because I like a lot of aspects about the US too... just not atm.

Keep your mind open though. Your future will have choices if you work hard.
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tinygirl96
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Save up big time. This is my advice.
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ry7xsfa
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(Original post by ColtTheWolf)
You're pretty accurate, honestly. I would say it's going to be impossible to move before uni is finished as they only give visas to people who can invest large sums of money into their country, highly skilled workers, and a few other criteria that I don't believe you fit.

I'm going into a medical degree and have been looking at writing my USMLE step 1 and what it entails to move to the US after I've finished my degree and done the step 1 and 2 ect, and it's a lot of work and money.

I feel bad to say it lol... but unless your parents have a LOT of money, it's pretty much not happening before you get a degree that's high in demand.

Wow, it sounds ****ing soul crushing. Was to me when I looked up because I like a lot of aspects about the US too... just not atm.

Keep your mind open though. Your future will have choices if you work hard.
Oh definitely. I've been fortunate in the sense that I've been able to get a place at a US uni, with enough financial aid to cover costs (I'm from a low-income background). Unfortunately, not everybody can be so lucky and I hope for the best for OP and anyone else in the same situation.
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Other_Owl
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Why not move to an EU member state while your UK passport is still valid? Languages are closely related here so it shouldn't be that hard learning them.
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ColtTheWolf
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(Original post by tinygirl96)
Save up big time. This is my advice.
A 17 year old wont be able to afford the US even with saving though.

Assuming they get a job for 25k a year (very unlikely, would be 20k max) they'd be saving for years simply to afford uni - this doesn't take into account their education, food, rent, transport, entertainment, utility bills, emergencies, etc.

They'd be saving until post uni at least, so they may as well just go to uni in the first place.

You can get private loans, but getting one in the hopes of going to the USA wouldn't get approved by any bank, anywhere without a god level interest rate because it's such a high risk loan.
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Tobez
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I've got everything sorted with getting my college degree out there, in terms of visas and money, I just wanted to know what I could do after to stay.
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Tobez
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(Original post by ry7xsfa)
Some US colleges offer need-based financial aid for students who can't afford to attend college.

But yeah... it's really too early to think about Citizenship. Firstly, you'd have to have some kind of qualification or skill for them to let you into the US in the first place (usually on a work visa - a student visa won't do for this because of requirements). You'll then need to get a green card to become a Lawful Permanent Resident (LPR). The most common ways of obtaining this are marrying an American, or living in the country for a certain amount of time. You must then apply and take a test for citizenship. It's a multi-year process.

Disclaimer: I'm not an expert on any of this, but I have looked into it for myself. This is the information as I understand it, though it could be incorrect. Do your own research too.
thank you, this helps a lot
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Stb1750
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Job opportunities - It's even harder for Americans to get a job never mind someone new to the country.
Quality of Life - Obesity? Less annual leave? Pay for health? What quality of life? Warmer weather maybe? Come on!
Love America - That's definitely the TV shows and movies talking. America has deep routed issues that honestly embarrass the country. They aren't all bad people across the pond, and the UK isn't exactly good or even better, but their issues are certainly more inflated making it more obvious.
Study - I think if you can study in USA then you should! I mean why not? It's a chance to move away and experience new things. Maybe it's a taster of the life you could have their permanently. Plus, you're more likely to have success in a permanent move if you plan to work at their universities (I don't know why, must be a skills shortage?).
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