What to expect at Sixth form or College

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yourstruly101
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Next year, I'll be going to college and I wanted to know what should I expect?
A few friends and family members have told me about how hard A-levels are, how I need to change my revision techniques, and how the jump from GCSE and A level is unexpectant. I've taken note of these things and I was wondering can people share their experiences with me
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The RAR
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(Original post by yourstruly101)
Next year, I'll be going to college and I wanted to know what should I expect?
A few friends and family members have told me about how hard A-levels are, how I need to change my revision techniques, and how the jump from GCSE and A level is unexpectant. I've taken note of these things and I was wondering can people share their experiences with me
This really isn't a joke, I too thought at first they were exaggerating but when I did go to Sixth Form, oh boy A levels were very different from GCSE. Is way harder and way longer
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Da14a
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Initial jump isn't too harsh - especially if you keep up with things. About revision techniques, I'd say the best time to improve them is now - you have many months before your GCSE's so I'd attempt my hardest to fully incorporate good revision habits now. Namely, spaced repetition and effective testing (using practice paper q's).
Here are some good videos from an amazing youtuber, Ali Abdaal:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukLnPbIffxE - how to study for exams
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBXnxlLR0PY - study tips

Idk if I am allowed to link these but eh.:banned:
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by Da14a)
Initial jump isn't too harsh - especially if you keep up with things. About revision techniques, I'd say the best time to improve them is now - you have many months before your GCSE's so I'd attempt my hardest to fully incorporate good revision habits now. Namely, spaced repetition and effective testing (using practice paper q's).
Here are some good videos from an amazing youtuber, Ali Abdaal:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ukLnPbIffxE - how to study for exams
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBXnxlLR0PY - study tips

Idk if I am allowed to link these but eh.:banned:
Thank you I'll watch these later!
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by The RAR)
This really isn't a joke, I too thought at first they were exaggerating but when I did go to Sixth Form, oh boy A levels were very different from GCSE. Is way harder and way longer
Woww! Because I started doing proper revision in year 11, I'm finished my work like at 3 in the morning lol. Is A-levels gonna be worse?
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Jonathanツ
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I'm a Y13 student atm and I can confirm that A levels are definitely very demanding (especially in your second year). I only do 2 A level and 2 BTECS, even that is pretty difficult to handle. Really with A levels, the trick is to try hard the first year so you don't have as much stress the second year... If your studying till like 3 in the morning on GCSE though, my guess is that you will be fine. Many people do underestimate A levels because they think fewer subjects are easier, they have no idea how tuff they can be. Personally, if you haven't chosen your courses yet, I would suggest doing a BTEC, they will reduce your stress at the end and in my opinion, work well even when doing A levels. Anyways try not to worry too much
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by Jonathanツ)
I'm a Y13 student atm and I can confirm that A levels are definitely very demanding (especially in your second year). I only do 2 A level and 2 BTECS, even that is pretty difficult to handle. Really with A levels, the trick is to try hard the first year so you don't have as much stress the second year... If your studying till like 3 in the morning on GCSE though, my guess is that you will be fine. Many people do underestimate A levels because they think fewer subjects are easier, they have no idea how tuff they can be. Personally, if you haven't chosen your courses yet, I would suggest doing a BTEC, they will reduce your stress at the end and in my opinion, work well even when doing A levels. Anyways try not to worry too much
Alright, Thank you x
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redmeercat
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1st Year Uni student here!
Don't let people tell you that success is impossible during A levels. They're hard, but hard work also pays off. Go in expecting to work hard, don't pressure yourself to get good grades immediately, but do keep trying and keep believing that you're capable of progressing more. You do have time to have a social life, you just have to decide every day what your priorities are, and to look after yourself by keeping on top of work (where you can!) and having time off. Something that can help with understanding lessons in content-heavy courses such as science and/or history is reading the relevant chapter of the textbook (and even making notes if you're feeling fancy) before the lesson, and using the lesson to clear up anything that doesn't make sense, but again, don't worry if you don't have time to do that all the time! You'll honestly be fine at sixth form, I preferred it in every respect to the lower school, and the time really does fly by, even if it's difficult in the moment!
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by redmeercat)
1st Year Uni student here!
Don't let people tell you that success is impossible during A levels. They're hard, but hard work also pays off. Go in expecting to work hard, don't pressure yourself to get good grades immediately, but do keep trying and keep believing that you're capable of progressing more. You do have time to have a social life, you just have to decide every day what your priorities are, and to look after yourself by keeping on top of work (where you can!) and having time off. Something that can help with understanding lessons in content-heavy courses such as science and/or history is reading the relevant chapter of the textbook (and even making notes if you're feeling fancy) before the lesson, and using the lesson to clear up anything that doesn't make sense, but again, don't worry if you don't have time to do that all the time! You'll honestly be fine at sixth form, I preferred it in every respect to the lower school, and the time really does fly by, even if it's difficult in the moment!
Thank you, this is very reassuring!
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mabeloliver
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(Original post by The RAR)
This really isn't a joke, I too thought at first they were exaggerating but when I did go to Sixth Form, oh boy A levels were very different from GCSE. Is way harder and way longer
I'm currently in year12 and I guess the hardest thing is revising on top of your homework. If you have any frees try to start using them properly now as it will help you so much in the future. Start making notes throughout the year as well as every subject has so much content and go to your teachers early if your struggling as it will only build up.
The jump in difficulty of content for me wasn't to bad, its more the amount of work you'll receive
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by mabeloliver)
I'm currently in year12 and I guess the hardest thing is revising on top of your homework. If you have any frees try to start using them properly now as it will help you so much in the future. Start making notes throughout the year as well as every subject has so much content and go to your teachers early if your struggling as it will only build up.
The jump in difficulty of content for me wasn't to bad, its more the amount of work you'll receive
Oh wow, okay, thanks for this!
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xxarooj786
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Thank you, everyone, these replies have been so helpful because I'm also going to college next year and was quite worried about the work load and the transition in general x
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Carl CJ Johnson
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I am currently in sixth form and the work load definitely feels like it increased even if it is only 3 subjects, like i have done none of my half term homework and I've got so much to do I'm stressing over that now... I have to fix up lol.
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GogetaORvegito?
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(Original post by yourstruly101)
Next year, I'll be going to college and I wanted to know what should I expect?
A few friends and family members have told me about how hard A-levels are, how I need to change my revision techniques, and how the jump from GCSE and A level is unexpectant. I've taken note of these things and I was wondering can people share their experiences with me
y13 student here. There wasn't really a jump for me. The only thing I would say is take the first year seriously. You have no time next year to make up for first year slack especially because you're gonna be busy doing work experiences, extra curricular things, uni application. Predicted grades will be used in year 13.
Last edited by GogetaORvegito?; 4 weeks ago
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by Carl CJ Johnson)
I am currently in sixth form and the work load definitely feels like it increased even if it is only 3 subjects, like i have done none of my half term homework and I've got so much to do I'm stressing over that now... I have to fix up lol.
rah
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Dancer2001
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It’s definitely a jump, but don’t let people scare you.
I found A levels a lot more enjoyable, because I was only studying the subjects I was interested in, but more importantly everything was at a much deeper level, so I really understood the concepts unlike at GCSE when I could guess my way to a semi-decent grade without understanding the content.
As long as you have subjects you like, you can do really well. You have to REALLY like your subjects though. In the first few weeks you’ll have the opportunity to change them, make sure you do this if you need to.
Last edited by Dancer2001; 4 weeks ago
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by Dancer2001)
It’s definitely a jump, but don’t let people scare you.
I found A levels a lot more enjoyable, because I was only studying the subjects I was interested in, but more importantly everything was at a much deeper level, so I really understood the concepts unlike at GCSE when I could guess my way to a semi-decent grade without understanding the content.
As long as you have subjects you like, you can do really well. You have to REALLY like your subjects though. In the first few weeks you’ll have the opportunity to change them, make sure you do this if you need to.
Thank you
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fluous
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I'm currently going through my 'transition' phase as I like to call it. It's like when gcses started all over again, and I went into a state of panic. A-levels are definitely very different (I'm in year 12 right now). There is definitely way more content and a lot of the time I feel very, very stupid (similarly to how my gcses started lol) but I know that I'll get used to it as time passes. (probably doesn't help that I have crippling anxiety but) A lot more will be expected of you in year 13 and not just academically; You might feel a lot more pressure to do well and do more things like work experience. The best advice I can give is to stay on top of your work, have good time management and make sure you can understand what you are being taught, as well as pay attention to your mental health (which I, myself, am struggling to do at the moment).
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yourstruly101
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(Original post by fluous)
I'm currently going through my 'transition' phase as I like to call it. It's like when gcses started all over again, and I went into a state of panic. A-levels are definitely very different (I'm in year 12 right now). There is definitely way more content and a lot of the time I feel very, very stupid (similarly to how my gcses started lol) but I know that I'll get used to it as time passes. (probably doesn't help that I have crippling anxiety but) A lot more will be expected of you in year 13 and not just academically; You might feel a lot more pressure to do well and do more things like work experience. The best advice I can give is to stay on top of your work, have good time management and make sure you can understand what you are being taught, as well as pay attention to your mental health (which I, myself, am struggling to do at the moment).
Thank you so much and I know you will get through it! x
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