Finding a place to rent when on zero hour contract?

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Anonymous #1
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I’m not a student as in I don’t get student loans, so this income is my own income entirely with no income to fall back on for support. So, has anyone managed to find a landlord who will rent to them on a zero hour contract? I work at McDonald’s, and I get given around 10-15 hours a week consistently (I have never not been given work each week, I always get work each week) and at my McDonald’s there’s always extra shifts to pick up (literally always, there’s no week where there isn’t extra shifts advertised) so I could easily pick up extra shifts to make up 20-25 hours a week of work. On my wage, that would be enough to rent a place that’s £400pcm (bills included) in a flat share or shared house. But, it’s not legally guaranteed. However, if I had say 3 or 4 consecutive bank statements to back up that I can easily earn enough on a zero hour contract consistently to rent a place, do you think that would be enough to convince a landlord? Especially if I pay the holding deposit and security deposit?

Furthermore, I wouldn’t have a guarantor if I looked for a place to rent. Not because I am financially irresponsible or anything like that, but just because I don’t actually know anyone who qualifies as a guarantor. My dad (single parent) is on benefits and doesn’t work so he can’t be a guarantor, and I honestly don’t know anyone else who could act as one. As I said at the start of the post, I’m not a student at uni and I don’t get student loans, so not only do I not have a ‘safety net’ of finite to fall back on, things like helping hands (I think, can’t remember the name but that company that will act as guarantors for students) can’t be used by me. So what would I need to do to convince a landlord to rent to me, a 19 year old on a zero hour contract with no guarantor? 😅

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Anonymous #1
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Just gonna bump myself up
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SoulfulTwist
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Yes it should be enough.
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by SoulfulTwist)
Yes it should be enough.
Thank you for the reply

Do you really think it would be? Do you have any experience (either you or anyone you know) who has rented on zero hours before?
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SoulfulTwist
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thank you for the reply

Do you really think it would be? Do you have any experience (either you or anyone you know) who has rented on zero hours before?
If you're lucky tbh. The landlord/agency might be reluctant to give it to you if you don't have a guarantor, but if you can pay the deposit, and show the past few months wages, it could be enough.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Anonymous)
So what would I need to do to convince a landlord to rent to me, a 19 year old on a zero hour contract with no guarantor? 😅

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I think most landlords would want a guarantor to be honest which is difficult for you. Do you have any other relatives you could ask like an aunt/uncle? If not, I think you may have to stay where you are until you get a permanent contract but I could be wrong. Maybe phone your local Citizens Advice Bureau for some free advice?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by SoulfulTwist)
If you're lucky tbh. The landlord/agency might be reluctant to give it to you if you don't have a guarantor, but if you can pay the deposit, and show the past few months wages, it could be enough.
Yeah, the law now means that I can only pay one week holding deposit and 5 weeks security deposit max, so that’s £600 which I could pay. Otherwise I would offer a larger deposit since I’ve been saving. But yeah, I know luck needs to be a factor. I’m trying to get moved to a guaranteed hours contract but maccies doesn’t really like doing that :lol: you’re supposed to be asked at interview if you want a zero hour or guaranteed hours contract but they never asked me so
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by harrysbar)
I think most landlords would want a guarantor to be honest which is difficult for you. Do you have any other relatives you could ask like an aunt/uncle? If not, I think you may have to stay where you are until you get a permanent contract but I could be wrong. Maybe phone your local Citizens Advice Bureau for some free advice?
Yeah I’ve looked on the citizens advice website but the info wasn’t up to date. It says to by pass having a guarantor the best thing to do is pay extra security deposit, but legally you can only pay 5 weeks rent now, and the other thing said to offer multiple months rent up front. For a rent of £400pcm I could probably offer 2 months up front plus the holding and security deposit stuff, but the website said 6+ months up front would be better which I can’t do. And no, there’s no one else I could ask. I genuinely don’t know anyone who could act as a guarantor because what bit of my family that does work doesn’t earn enough to be classed as a guarantor. Which I know puts me at a big disadvantage tbh. Thanks for the reply and help
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks for the reply and help
That's ok, sorry I can't suggest a good solution. Maybe try talking to your line manager at work about it? See how long it would take before they could offer you a permanent contract if they are pleased with your work
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by harrysbar)
That's ok, sorry I can't suggest a good solution. Maybe try talking to your line manager at work about it? See how long it would take before they could offer you a permanent contract if they are pleased with your work
McDonald’s just doesn’t like to give people permanent hours for some reason, almost everyone at my store is on a flexible hours contract which is basically zero hour. The thing is, everyone gets work. We all get scheduled shifts every week without fail so there’s not much to complain about, just the number of hours. Right now I’m on flexible part time so I get around 10-20 hours a week (but they don’t pay you during breaks so 10 hours scheduled is actually 9 hours paid) so I think my chances are better if I ask to move to flexible full time (21+ hours a week) instead of guaranteed hours. Idk why they don’t like them tbh.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by Anonymous)
McDonald’s just doesn’t like to give people permanent hours for some reason, almost everyone at my store is on a flexible hours contract which is basically zero hour. The thing is, everyone gets work. We all get scheduled shifts every week without fail so there’s not much to complain about, just the number of hours. Right now I’m on flexible part time so I get around 10-20 hours a week (but they don’t pay you during breaks so 10 hours scheduled is actually 9 hours paid) so I think my chances are better if I ask to move to flexible full time (21+ hours a week) instead of guaranteed hours. Idk why they don’t like them tbh.
probably makes it easier for them to not have to give people sick pay, paid lunch breaks etc
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by harrysbar)
probably makes it easier for them to not have to give people sick pay, paid lunch breaks etc
Yeah probably. I’m honesty not bothered about guaranteed hours because like I said, I always get given work each work. I just need to the amount of work to increase is all
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Always_Confused
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Honestly, it depends on the landlord.
Some landlords have a requirement that you earn at least 20 x the monthly rent to guarantee you can pay all bills and living costs. You would need a work reference + bank statements to prove this.
Other landlords may trust that you can make the rent, but would want a guarantor. This was my experience when I first moved out. I earned enough to easily pay the rent + bills etc, but nowhere near the minimum amount they said I should be earning to be confident in my earnings alone. The landlord I rented with didn't much care about the financial background of my guarantor, they just wanted one they could chase down should I not pay my rent. So my parents (both on PIP) could guarantor me. Other landlords I've rented with have wanted a home owner as my guarantor so I've had to turn to other family members.

You're in a good place with the recent renting rules that have come in. Previously, agencies and landlords would have you pay a non-refundable referencing fee even when they knew it would come back as a negative and they couldn't give you the property. That's illegal now, so you can apply to as many properties as you can to find a landlord who will take you on.

Words of advice:
- If a property seems too good to be true, it probably is.
- Don't pay anything until you've seen the property.
- Don't put any money down until you've signed a contract. Always ask for the contract prior to paying a deposit.
- Check all the terms in the contract before signing.
- If you view a property and repairs need doing, ask for the repairs to be added as a term in the contract. There is no such thing as a good landlord. I've had agents mess me around with repairs. I've had private landlords mess me around with repairs. If they've signed a contract to say the repairs will be done before you move in, you will have a higher legal standing to challenge them.
- Check reviews for agencies. Not just trust pilot either. Really search the web. I rented with an agency that had glowing Google and trust pilot reviews, but it became obvious that wasn't the full picture. A quick scout around and a few news articles later and it was clear the agency were notorious for leaving tenants in unsafe housing.

Good luck finding somewhere! I would be careful though being on a zero hour contract. Those hours could be taken from you and once you sign a contract, you are eligible for rent for however long the contract states.
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