hijackedbrother
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I'm in a course but not in the U.K but in an Irish private institution. I want to do a masters in an English university. I've heard that CS has one of the highest amount of dropouts because it attracts a lot of "I'm good with computers because I browse Facebook/use Reddit" and people don't realize that there's a lot of mathematics involved and logical thinking.

Is it worth it in the long run? Many students in my class say they are thinking of dropping out and it's only been a month!
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username5383500
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(Original post by hijackedbrother)
I've heard that CS has one of the highest amount of dropouts because it attracts a lot of "I'm good with computers because I browse Facebook/use Reddit" and people don't realize that there's a lot of mathematics involved and logical thinking.
I'm not entirely sure this is the case. I don't think there's tons of people thinking "I know how to Facebook and YouTube, therefore I'll be good at CompSci". Moreso it's just not an easy subject for a lot of people in the first place, and there are a lot of misconceptions around it.

CompSci courses can be generally divided into those that a Maths/Programming heavy, and those that are more broad, covering a larger range of topics. Maths and logical thinking is something that doesn't come easily to a lot of people, which makes the former difficult. But CompSci is about more than just programming.

CompSci is also not a subject that's available for everyone. There's going to be plenty of students who had very little background in CompSci at GCSE or A Level, and a degree is not really where you should be learning a subject for the first time. For some it's overwhelming, and for others they simply find it's not the right subject for them. This is less common in more core subjects that are offered universally prior to degree level.

And of course you get people who don't have the right motivation. I've spoken to students who only took a course based on the career prospects and the salary, with no indication they'll like the subject or be any good at it. So all round, the reason for high dropouts is quite a complex discussion.

(Original post by hijackedbrother)
Is it worth it in the long run? Many students in my class say they are thinking of dropping out and it's only been a month!
Depends how you define "worth it". I personally wouldn't use people in your class as an example here, since they don't have that long run experience. As a general rule of thumb, people with degrees are on average going to be paid more and have an easier time finding a job. Over the course of your lifetime, the opportunities you get are probably going to outweigh the invested cost. A 3 year degree is ~£27K in fees, so if over an average career a degree nets you an extra £1000 a year then by definition it's "worth it".

But on a personal level, it depends. Someone graduating from a top uni with a First and someone graduating from an average uni with a Third aren't comparable. If you don't enjoy the subject, or you're below average, or you think there's a different degree that'd be more useful then it probably isn't worth it. But it's a very personal question that depends heavily on your circumstances. I'd never actively say that any degree is or is not worth it, because broad statements like that are misleading to the individual.

You need to look at your personal circumstances, what you're aiming for and go from there. For example, are the jobs you're interested in going to require a Masters? Is a Masters going to open up more options? Do you personally want to commit to that? There's a lot of things to think about and we can't really give you an answer
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