angeldemiercoles
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is hence why grammatically incorrect or is it only used in certain situations
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StopRightThere
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I'm pretty sure both are grammatically correct.
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Billy-Bullseye
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When you contrast coleopterist's Ngrams research with the answers shared between every other Google result, it appears that "hence why" is a case of "incorrect, but nobody cares" similar to "quadrilogy" (which should use the Greek "tetra-" with the Greek "-logia" to form "tetralogy" but people have been getting it wrong since at least 1865 according to the OED).

Perhaps I haven't read enough older fiction, but my intuition has always agreed with the view that "hence why" is incorrect because it translates to "[that is the reason that] why".

However, my intuition did also lead me into conflict with a more pedantic friend over whether "hence why" is ever valid on technical grounds.

The use my intuition keeps claiming validity for is that "hence why X" makes sense as a short form of "hence my decision to X" (in contrast to "hence X", rendering the decision the primary subject of the clause, rather than the action taken as a result).
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ROTL94
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I'd go with 'hence' no need to say something in two words when one is sufficient.
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(Original post by StopRightThere)
I'm pretty sure both are grammatically correct.
Hence and why have similar meanings, therefore when using both you're using the same word twice.
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Icosagon
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Rufus the red
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angeldemiercoles
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ok so here is an example of a sentence using hence why
"I am unable to talk to you face to face, hence why I am writing this letter" I feel like using just hence sounds wrong ygm but im not sure
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Rufus the red
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Hence means 'as a consequence' or 'for this reason' or, even, 'this is why' so in this context 'hence why' is not grammatically correct as you are saying something along the lines of 'this is why why'.
Hope this helps. :borat:
(Original post by angeldemiercoles)
ok so here is an example of a sentence using hence why
"I am unable to talk to you face to face, hence why I am writing this letter" I feel like using just hence sounds wrong ygm but im not sure
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Quick-use
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Hence and why have similar meanings, therefore when using both you're using the same word twice.
Not really.

1. I like Japan. Hence, I'm going there this winter.
2. I like Japan. Why(,) I'm going there this winter.

Number 2 does not work whatsoever. Hence, we can deduce that 'hence' and 'why' are not interchangeable.

(Original post by angeldemiercoles)
ok so here is an example of a sentence using hence why
"I am unable to talk to you face to face, hence why I am writing this letter" I feel like using just hence sounds wrong ygm but im not sure
Both hence and hence why work here. Although potentially incorrect historically, I think 'hence why' has become popular as of late, specifically within oral speech. It's certainly more emphatic and allows for the extra oomph. I reckon that its prominence within oral speech has spilled over onto writing, making it appropriate within most texts like essays or speeches. It's perfectly acceptable.

Ergo, 'hence' and 'hence why' are both correct. The former is generally more formal while the latter is slightly less so and used more for emphasis (when making a point). Essay writing isn't overly formal, meaning that you could use either variations if you really wanted to (even if 'hence' would sound more academic).
Last edited by Quick-use; 7 months ago
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Rufus the red
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(Original post by Quick-use)
Not really.

1. I like Japan. Hence, I'm going there this winter.
2. I like Japan. Why(,) I'm going there this winter.

Number 2 does not work whatsoever. Hence, we can deduce that 'hence' and 'why' are not interchangeable.
I believe that hence has a meaning of 'this is why' which would render them not interchangeable but rather one an expansion on the other.
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