can alpha and beta both be emitted at the same time?

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username3477548
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Report Thread starter 11 months ago
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i searched it up and got two diff sources saying the opposite thing. see attached
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uberteknik
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(Original post by vix.xvi)
i searched it up and got two diff sources saying the opposite thing. see attached
Not from the same decay because the source of each type of decay is different:

Beta particles are either electron or positron ejections from a neutron rich nucleus.

Alpha particles are helium ions ejected from an unstable proton-rich nucleus and, through that ejection, leaves behind a new element of reduced mass (4 a.m.u.). The new element (post alpha emission) may now also be radioactive which may emit further alpha particles ( a third element is formed) or may now be a beta emitter. Note: the original nucleus must first emit the alpha particle and therefore changes to a different element before a potential beta particle is emitted.

Ergo, proton-rich and neutron-rich are mutually exclusive states.
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